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Taking The Airfield

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  • Taking The Airfield

    Sorry Losers......., but you must deal with what you have. There are no mention of Panzergrenadiers, Big Guns (88's), mines, etc. Remember, this is war, so don't be careless, and don't give away all of your strategy in this forum. Am I spoiling everybody's fun? Tycoon1969, what are you anyway, a veteran of der werchmact? Too much information. Keep it simple. I will enjoy crushing you under the heel of my boot. I like this magazine, I think it's cool. To everyone, may I suggest reading up on your Sun-tzu, or maybe some Patton. Howzabout Rommel. See you on the battlefield, kammeraden. GhostSoldier.
    Life is precious, but also cheap. For without war, there is no peace. GS ~ A Soldier's Ghost. A Warrior's Soul.

  • #2
    Hooah! There's some Patton style attitude!
    Publisher
    Armchair General Magazine
    Weider History Group

    Comment


    • #3
      There are no mention of Panzergrenadiers, Big Guns (88's), mines, etc.

      Correct, no mention. Read the article and there was no time for placing mines coordination between Flak (Luftwaffe), panzergrenadiers, or the panzer battalion Major. This is a tactical operation, not an attack then set up a suitable defense for the awaited counterattack.

      Tycoon1969, what are you anyway, a veteran of der werchmact?

      No, not a veteran of "der werchmact", nor a veteran of der Wehrmacht. I realized after posting that I gave out too much info to those who need help solving this problem, but I doubt I will be the recipient of any crushing whatsoever, but on the contrary, I think I might do some crushing myself. For this situation one may want to read up on his/her desert warfare, British tendencies, and Rommel's aggressive tactics, which did lead to the successes he had on every level vs. Brits. Rommel did much with little and used aggressive maneuvers to overcome when he should have been sent reeling. And I agree, very cool mag and do love this tactical problem solving.

      Good Luck all!
      Tycoon1969 a.k.a, Aaron

      Comment


      • #4
        Once again, time, logistics, etc would not allow for any 88's due to the lumbering prime movers, digging them in, dealing with Luftwaffe junior officers, who by German military regulations, could not become subordinate to ranking officers of any arm of the military, including Waffen-SS (yes, I know, we're not dealing with any SS here, but I'm just trying to make a point)! Panzertruppen officers, infantry officers, etc. had to rely on playing nice and asking for cooperation with Flak batteries, and so forth for support vs. ground targets. Only division and/or Corps commanders and higher could make non-organic Flak units subordinate to smaller units for specific operations.

        Referring to Patton by some in other posts, just think about this, if Rommel had the supplies, manpower, air power, free hand to do as he pleased, and number in armored vehicles, Rommel could have pushed all the way to the Horn of Africa and driven all the way through the Middle East, up into Russia and broken through and relieved the Sixth Army at Stalingrad!
        Tycoon1969 a.k.a, Aaron

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        • #5
          Taking the airfield

          Tycoon 1969, You can spell. I can't. Still, see you on the battlefield. By the way, don't forget Guderian's book, `Achtung!Panzer'. GhostSoldier. Slippery, real slippery.
          Life is precious, but also cheap. For without war, there is no peace. GS ~ A Soldier's Ghost. A Warrior's Soul.

          Comment


          • #6
            Taking the airfield

            All hail Tycoon1969!:bowdown: :bowdown: :bowdown: :bowdown: :bowdown: GhostSoldier.
            Life is precious, but also cheap. For without war, there is no peace. GS ~ A Soldier's Ghost. A Warrior's Soul.

            Comment


            • #7
              GhostSoldier, You're exactly right, we musn't forget the brilliant Generaloberst and Inspector of Panzer-Troops Guderian. Funny that you mention him. I already had "Panzer Leader" and "Guderian,Panzer Leader", and just last week got "Achtung-Panzer!". As an interesting note, a Political Science instructor I had in college a few years ago, who was a retired Colonel and Asian Studies (PhD) expert at the Pentagon said that at one of the military academies he attended, "Achtung-Panzer!" was required reading and the study of Guderian's writings were part of the curriculum. At the time I thought that it was interesting, but since then, I'm not surprised. Anyway, just a babbling sidenote :sleep:
              For this Airfield scenario, I thought it might be up my alley as since I was about eleven y/o, I had been fascinated with Rommel and desert warfare. That being said, I have read probably 12+ books and many other articles, studies, etc, on the WWII North African conflict. I just hope all I have read will help me to be successful in this tactical problem solver.
              Tycoon1969 a.k.a, Aaron

              Comment


              • #8
                Taking the Airfield

                Ghost Soldier ranted:

                Sorry Losers......., but you must deal with what you have.There are no mention of Panzergrenadiers, Big Guns (88's), mines, etc. Remember, this is war, so don't be careless, and don't give away all of your strategy in this forum. . . . Tycoon1969, what are you anyway, a veteran of der werchmact? . . . . I will enjoy crushing you under the heel of my boot.To everyone, may I suggest reading up on your Sun-tzu, or maybe some Patton. Howzabout Rommel. See you on the battlefield, kammeraden.

                And while we're at it, why don't you just come and read to us? I'm sure you would find that more to your liking. Maybe afterward you can tell us all how to better run our lives, advance our careers, and manage our investments
                :nonono:
                Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
                (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tycoon1969
                  Once again, time, logistics, etc would not allow for any 88's due to the lumbering prime movers, digging them in, dealing with Luftwaffe junior officers, who by German military regulations, could not become subordinate to ranking officers of any arm of the military, including Waffen-SS (yes, I know, we're not dealing with any SS here, but I'm just trying to make a point)! Panzertruppen officers, infantry officers, etc. had to rely on playing nice and asking for cooperation with Flak batteries, and so forth for support vs. ground targets. Only division and/or Corps commanders and higher could make non-organic Flak units subordinate to smaller units for specific operations.

                  Referring to Patton by some in other posts, just think about this, if Rommel had the supplies, manpower, air power, free hand to do as he pleased, and number in armored vehicles, Rommel could have pushed all the way to the Horn of Africa and driven all the way through the Middle East, up into Russia and broken through and relieved the Sixth Army at Stalingrad!
                  The only problem with your statements is the historical record. At the actual battle of Sidi Rezegh there was a battery of four 88mm dual purpose guns, numerous PAK50 anti-tank guns, artillery fire support from north of the Trigh Capuzzo, but NO Pz III J/L's that are used in the CDG (the long barrel, high velocity version intoduced in May, 1942). You're not the only one who has read about the battles of the Western Desert. I am taking this info from "Panzer Battles" (1955) written by F.W. von Mellenthin who was Rommel's staff intellegence officer and then chief of staff (after Colonel Westphal was wounded) during the battle
                  Lance W.

                  Peace through superior firepower.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lance Williams
                    The only problem with your statements is the historical record. At the actual battle of Sidi Rezegh there was a battery of four 88mm dual purpose guns, numerous PAK50 anti-tank guns, artillery fire support from north of the Trigh Capuzzo, but NO Pz III J/L's that are used in the CDG (the long barrel, high velocity version intoduced in May, 1942). You're not the only one who has read about the battles of the Western Desert. I am taking this info from "Panzer Battles" (1955) written by F.W. von Mellenthin who was Rommel's staff intellegence officer and then chief of staff (after Colonel Westphal was wounded) during the battle

                    I never did make reference to having 88s and other A-T guns and was not trying to tie it into the historical battle. I was merely pointing out the problems of logistics, time and such for THIS scenario when people started calling for the 90th light and Ariete divisions in reserve, the Ramke Brigade to parachute in on top of Hill 175, etc, etc. You took my statement totally out of context. I never said either that there were PzIIILs or Js there, only asked if that's what the battalion might have in it. We are dealing with a tactical problem to solve, not how to change history. That said,
                    regardless of the presence of Pz.IIIJ s and Ls we have only a hypothetical problem similar to a battle that took place there where the British 7th Armored took a mauling, in addition to the New Zealanders. And yes, I'm well aware of Mellenthin, I read his book "Panzer Battles' several years ago.
                    The specs on the PzIII are not correct anyway. All PzIIIs after the Ausf. F (might as well say 20 tons since it was 19.8) weighed in at 20+ tons, not the 19.25 listed in the description of the PzIII in the scenario. It almost seems to be an amalgomation of the F(some fitted with the 50mm L/42) and reworked E also fitted with the same gun. Throw the Ausf. G in with this as most of this model were fitted with the 50mm L/42 and many G's served in the desert. Maybe the model of the PzIII in this scenario isn't as important as how you would set up and conduct your defense. I know that the gun on the tank does make a BIG difference in how one might consider conducting the operation, but consider that with 50mm frontal armor and 20mm spaced armor gave an advantage to the Panzer crews to shoot up the Stuarts while their HEAT rounds did nothing as they were deflected by the spaced armor, meanwhile the Panzers closing range and blasting the paper thin Stuarts to kingdom come. And the real battle has NO significance here. We're presented with a problem and must solve it as best we can.
                    Tycoon1969 a.k.a, Aaron

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                    • #11
                      Problem

                      OK with all the information, everybody know what actually happened at Sidi Rezegh but we are supose to solve this problem with the information given (and that means no 88's, mines, panzergranadier, etc)
                      Split the forces in two fine, split them in three????? no way

                      Nice magazine!!!!!

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                      • #12
                        Remember: In the arcticle it said there would be inaccuricies in ur info.

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