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Sun Tzu Art of War

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  • Memnon_Soter
    started a topic Sun Tzu Art of War

    Sun Tzu Art of War

    What do you think about this tractate? Which sentense or thought is your favorite?

  • Delenda estRoma
    replied
    Traditional accounts state that his descendant, Sun Bin, also wrote a treatise on military tactics, titled Sun Bin's Art of War. Both Sun Wu and Sun Bin were referred to as Sun Tzu in classical Chinese writings, and some historians believed that Sun Wu was in fact Sun Bin until Sun Bin's own treatise was discovered in 1972.


    ancient Chinese military general, strategist and philosopher who is traditionally believed to be the author of The Art of War,

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Tzu#_

    Leave a comment:


  • Delenda estRoma
    replied
    There is a HUGE controversey over his eru existence. All we have is "his" book ehich may not be his.

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  • calger14
    replied
    The book itself is so surprisingly small but incredibly good

    Leave a comment:


  • georgepatton
    replied
    Originally posted by Delenda estRoma View Post
    We have no clue if Sun Tzu even existed.
    Well, I'm pretty sure that he did

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Tzu
    http://scienceofstrategy.org/main/content/sun-tzus-life

    Leave a comment:


  • Delenda estRoma
    replied
    We have no clue if Sun Tzu even existed.

    Leave a comment:


  • georgepatton
    replied
    Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
    The Art of War





    By: Sun Tzu c. 554 BC c. 496 BC

    The Art of War is a Chinese military treatise written during the 6th century BC by Sun Tzu. Composed of 13 chapters, each of which is devoted to one aspect of warfare, it has long been praised as the definitive work on military strategies and tactics of its time. Translated by Lionel Giles.

    http://www.booksshouldbefree.com/boo...war-by-sun-tzu
    Thank you! I look really forward to reading this today!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bwaha
    replied
    A free e-book.

    The Art of War





    By: Sun Tzu c. 554 BC c. 496 BC

    The Art of War is a Chinese military treatise written during the 6th century BC by Sun Tzu. Composed of 13 chapters, each of which is devoted to one aspect of warfare, it has long been praised as the definitive work on military strategies and tactics of its time. Translated by Lionel Giles.

    http://www.booksshouldbefree.com/boo...war-by-sun-tzu

    Leave a comment:


  • scottmanning
    replied
    I have returned to Sun Tzu several times throughout the years. As I get older, I find that he offers the most succinct, timeless analysis of warfare.

    It is hard to come up with a favorite, but currently, the following passage strikes me:

    "Anciently those called skilled in war conquered an enemy easily conquered. And therefore the victories won by a master of war gain him neither reputation for wisdom nor merit for valour."
    - The Art of War, VI.10-11
    There is a lot to digest here, but Sun Tzu stresses elsewhere that the true mastery of war is to win without fighting. When we think of great commanders of history, we often associate them with grand victories on the battlefield. Yet, Sun Tzu believes the true masters of war won victories that seemed so easy, we hardly notice them. This was due to the commander putting his troops in a position to win, as opposed to slugging it out on the battlefield.

    So were the greatest victories of someone like Napoleon at battles like Austerlitz (1805) or Friedland (1807) where he confronted armies and beat them on the battlefield? Or was it during a campaign like Ulm (1805) where he outmaneuvered an army and hardly had to fight to defeat it? I believe it was the latter and so would Sun Tzu.

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  • Selous
    replied
    It's one of those books you have to keep going back to, like On War and Jomini's Art of War. Book of Five Rings I re-read the other weak, at least some of it's 'books'/chapters. I think Sunzi's Art of war is more understandible though

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  • Kendoka Girl
    replied
    I had to read it a few years ago for work. It was kind of like reading the Book of Five Rings. It didn't make a lot of sense to me the first time reading.

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  • Torien
    replied
    Originally posted by stukoke View Post
    I agree that we should take the lessons of Sun Tsu and apply them as best we can, but do not discount other lessons that history's war masters have taught us.
    Very good point. Could probably be stated about every book...

    Leave a comment:


  • stukoke
    replied
    Originally posted by Torien View Post
    All warfare is based on deception. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near. Hold out baits to entice the enemy. Feign disorder, and crush him.
    - Sun Tzu, the Art of War


    I am one of those who think that the teachings of Sun Tzu can be applied to many fields of study.
    I agree that we should take the lessons of Sun Tsu and apply them as best we can, but do not discount other lessons that history's war masters have taught us.

    Leave a comment:


  • علامت پیروز
    replied
    Here is a link to Project Gutenberg's audio books, Art of War by Sunzi (SunTzu).

    http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/20594

    I've found it works great as a MP3 listened to on an iPod, while driving in a car over distance. Or while traveling on an airplane.

    Leave a comment:


  • Duncan
    replied
    I once heard something similar to your "signs of significance." We were told not to leave cigarette butts in the field because it was an indication of the state of supply.

    Leave a comment:

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