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Russian Armor/History Sites (For those who visited Russia)

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  • Russian Armor/History Sites (For those who visited Russia)

    Question for those who visited Russian Kubinka, and Mannerheim line. How did you do it? How accessible were they to you as foreigners? My fiance and I are Americans.

    Anyone experience May 9th in Russia? How accessible is it? Is Moscow a good choice for that day to see armor and have a good family oriented day?

    Anyone actually get on a military vehicle while there?

    Please share your memories.

    All the best.
    David

  • #2
    Originally posted by Sparta1978 View Post
    Question for those who visited Russian Kubinka, and Mannerheim line. How did you do it? How accessible were they to you as foreigners? My fiance and I are Americans.

    Anyone experience May 9th in Russia? How accessible is it? Is Moscow a good choice for that day to see armor and have a good family oriented day?

    Anyone actually get on a military vehicle while there?

    Please share your memories.

    All the best.
    David
    Hi, David

    Welcome to Moscow
    Kubinka museum is the most hard case. Foreigners need a special permission of the Ministry of Defense to visit it. This is possible through the service of some tourist companies. It's possible only by a group of people, not individual.

    I myself very rarely walk around Moscow on May 9th. Much people.
    I prefer to visit Poklonnaya Gora museum (Museum of the Great Patriotic War) or the Central Museum of the Russian Armed Forces in more quiet days.
    It's much more suitable for taking photos when vehicles and other armor are not hidden under a layer of children
    I'm not sure about prices for foreigners, but probably now they are not higher than $10 (photo/video costs additional ~$10). However need to check this, because they can vary (for example prices for the Central Museum of the Armed Forces seems to be ~$2-3).

    Regards
    Alex
    If you fire a rifle at the past, the future will fire a cannon at you.....

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    • #3
      I'm going to make a very unpatriotic suggestion, but you should go to Parola museum in Finland instead. They've got a very impressive collection of captured Soviet armour (from T-28 to T-50), as well as post-WWII tanks like T-72 and Leopard. Unlike the case in Kubinka, you can look inside some of the tanks, touch them, turn handles or whatever is only possible to turn. The Finnish Artillery Museum is only in half an hour's ride from there. You can get a single ticket to both museums for 9 Euro only.

      http://www.panssarimuseo.fi/kehys-e.html

      Now compare this to Kubinka - kilometers of red tape just to get there (you can steal the blueprints of a top secret Russian tank "Fighter for freedom comrade Lenin"), the place is freaking far away from Moscow in the middle of nowhere, you'll have to get a visa which costs a lot (no visas for Finland) and you'll pay the price of a decent house for a night's stay in a Moscow hotel.

      Putin and the Russian government have been speaking about the "unacceptability of reevaluation of the lessons we learned from WWII" for a long time, but in reality Russia is doing everything these lessons would be learned from other countries' textbooks.
      www.histours.ru

      Siege of Leningrad battlefield tour

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ShAA View Post
        I'm going to make a very unpatriotic suggestion, but you should go to Parola museum in Finland instead. ...
        Alex, ShAA, thanks for your replies.

        I totally understand moscow being too crowded on the 9th. Everyone seems to head there. I wonder whats a good spot to be close to tanks - maybe on a low bridge somewhere.

        I forgot all about Finland amour museum, and after what you say, it sounds like an interesting trip of its own. My ancestry is USSR, so I'll be visiting Russia irrespective of politics. while in college I visited Russia quite a bit for months at a time. I really have great memories of people I met, many into studying GPW. i may just scrap Kubinka if I can not make it a pleasant experience for me and my family. place is photographed to too much anyway. I'll put finland on my radar.

        What about mannerheim line. i have a friend who i wanted to take with me to explore it, but he has a 2 months old - it is unlikely to happen. I may need to be the guide for those I take there. Any good websites that have maps, geo locations, as I'd love to explore that.

        I've never been to St.Petersburg, so your help with contacts will go a long way.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ShAA View Post
          Putin and the Russian government have been speaking about the "unacceptability of reevaluation of the lessons we learned from WWII" for a long time, but in reality Russia is doing everything these lessons would be learned from other countries' textbooks.
          Absolutely agree here. In the past many years I can't remember A SINGLE HISTORICAL book published in English, or other language under patronage of the Ministry of Defense. All the books, which were translated had been done by private initiatives of authors, or their friends and partners abroad!

          Also, no sites with official military history in English were opened...

          Regards.
          Alex
          If you fire a rifle at the past, the future will fire a cannon at you.....

          Comment


          • #6
            Petersburg is pretty crowded on 9 May as well, though I can't imagine being as bad as Moscow. I like Navy Day better anyways. And as the ships are in the Neva for like a week the crowding is a bit spread out. Plus maybe having been a tanker makes me less interested in seeing tanks since it seems like work

            I honestly don't think going to the Mannerheim Line is really 'family oriented' Sasha and I were planning to go there last fall, and I remember it involving long train rides. Not the most family fun filled day. I don't think it would be wise to bring small children up there.

            There is a thread in the Russia subforum where I have posted pictures I took in Piter in 09 and 10 around the 9 May holiday. It will give you a little idea of how the crowd is.
            Кто там?
            Это я - Почтальон Печкин!
            Tunis is a Carthigenian city!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by amvas View Post
              Absolutely agree here. In the past many years I can't remember A SINGLE HISTORICAL book published in English, or other language under patronage of the Ministry of Defense. All the books, which were translated had been done by private initiatives of authors, or their friends and partners abroad!

              Also, no sites with official military history in English were opened...

              Regards.
              Alex
              I remember when I volunteered to translate some interviews of Russian veterans at Iremember.ru about 7 years ago. I asked them which interviews hadn't been translated in order not to do an already done translation, and suggested some interviews to translate. The answer came something like in a month, and when I sent the translations they were posted in an year or so. I'm not playing these games any more.

              It's funny the super-blockbuster "Brest Fortress", which was so heavily advertised, has a very lame page on Amazon and as far as I know, English subtitles weren't originally planned for it. The Russians are stewing in their own juice while demanding that others would learn about their history.
              www.histours.ru

              Siege of Leningrad battlefield tour

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ShAA View Post
                The Russians are stewing in their own juice while demanding that others would learn about their history.
                Amen!
                Kind regards
                Igor

                * My grandfathers WW2 memoirs - Romania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Hungary, 1944-1945.
                * On the question of "2 mil. rapes" by RKKA
                * Verdicts of RKKA Military Tribunals for crimes against civilians in 1945

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sparta1978 View Post
                  Question for those who visited Russian Kubinka, and Mannerheim line. How did you do it? How accessible were they to you as foreigners? My fiance and I are Americans.

                  Anyone experience May 9th in Russia? How accessible is it? Is Moscow a good choice for that day to see armor and have a good family oriented day?

                  Anyone actually get on a military vehicle while there?
                  Please share your memories.

                  All the best.
                  David
                  Another option that I might suggest if you are interested in Russian museums - consider visiting Crimea.
                  Although it's now part of Ukraine, (but is considered an "autonomous republic") most of the people are Russian and that is the main language.

                  You don't need a visa to visit, and there is a good WWII museum "Diorama" about the siege of Sevastopol and the recapture in 1944.
                  Crimea also has many good family-oriented options.

                  And yes, you can even sit on some of the tanks.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    Thank you. No visa for usa citizens?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sparta1978 View Post
                      Thank you. No visa for usa citizens?
                      Nope!
                      Canadian & US citizens need no visa, only a valid passport.
                      You don't have to register with the authorities when you arrive either.

                      Ukraine had more friendly relations with the US during the last decade while the relations with Russia have been a bit frosty.

                      For museum buffs there is also the national war museum in Kiev, and the air museum as well.

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