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  • OFF-Topic: Foreigners about Russia

    Here is example of nonsense about Russia.

    http://news.independent.co.uk/europe...p?story=546769

    "Moscow Stories: Dogged by strays and drunken servicemen at the baked potato stalls
    By Andrew Osborne
    01 August 2004


    There's something about Moscow and dogs. Stray dogs, that is: they seem to be everywhere, despite the city authorities' best efforts to round them up and intern them in some kind of canine concentration camp on the outskirts from which they do not, I think, ever emerge.

    Worryingly, you get to recognise the same old faces. An elderly black Labrador-like mongrel basks on the steps of Pushkinskaya metro station every morning, apparently oblivious to the raucous cries of the newspaper sellers and leafleters around it. Then there are the wilder ones. In packs of four or five, they trot along Moscow's broad avenues as if sweeping across Africa's plains.

    Frequently mangy, often rabid, these creatures congregate around the popular jacket potato stands dotted around the city, where they think nothing of trying to snatch hot spuds from nervous diners.

    Getting rid of them is often difficult, but Muscovites, who are used to all kinds of strange sights and sounds, don't bat an eyelid; in fact many merely chuckle when they see a scrawny mongrel filleting a rubbish bin. But they can be a hazard.

    A friend of mine was enjoying what had up to then been a successful date, when a foaming stray sank its teeth into the girl's backside as the couple strolled along the pavement. The girl required various painful injections, had to forgo alcohol for an extended period and the evening ended, quite literally, in tears.

    ē Another hazard on Moscow's sometimes mean streets are aggressive drunks, particularly servicemen who find themselves on leave in the capital and go on massive benders. With musclebound, tattoo-infested arms bursting from their striped, sleeveless tops, these men are best avoided if you're not Russian.

    Clutching cheap cans of the Russian equivalent of Special Brew, they stagger about the place singing patriotic songs, pawing the local talent and leering at anyone who makes eye contact. It doesn't matter what you wear or how tightly you keep your mouth shut, they always seem to spot that you're not one of them.

    I was recently surrounded by a trio of drunken military men (at a jacket potato stand, needless to say) who appeared to have been imbibing for the previous 24 hours. "You foreigner," they cried. "Do you know who we are? We're paratroopers."

    "I bet you haven't done your military service," one challenged, grabbing the counter for support. Another started to jab me in the ribs and push me about as if I were an animal that needed rounding up, which is quite possibly how they perceived me. I didn't stick around to find out what would happen next, but I got the distinct impression that morale in Russia's armed forces could be higher.

    ē There is more than jacket potatoes on sale in Moscow's streets. Everything is available, from strawberries to forged college diplomas to pirated DVDs of the latest Hollywood blockbusters for $3 a pop.

    Babushkas sell freshly picked fruit, vegetables and flowers for a few roubles, and in the summer heat, soft drinks and ice-cream do a roaring trade. That you might expect, but there are also the kiosks that crowd the streets and the city's underpasses. They sell alcohol and cigarettes, knickers and tights, electrical cables, religious crosses, lovingly crafted fake watches or pirated software.

    It is a characteristic Russian mixture of free enterprise and illegality, epitomised by the latest CD-rom to go on sale - pirated copies of the Moscow police's criminal record files."

    Such "journalists" are making image of Russia in West.

    1. I never saw jacket potato in selling.

    2. I was in Moscow some times but I do not remember that I drawed attention on stray dogs. May be, there are some dogs but their amount is low. There are stray dogs and in Omsk. But I can not imagine that these dogs will wrest food from people!!!!

    3. And GREAT attention to main mistake of this journalist. He spoke about drunken soldiers in striped vest. He was amazed about low level of discipline in Russian Army.

    But I ask where did "Independent" find such idiot-journalist who writes about Russia but doesn't know well-known things about Russia?

    Attention!!!

    He wrote article on August, 3rd. But there was holiday on August, 2nd - "Day of Airborne troops". Ha-ha-ha, those guys were not soldiers of regular Army, those guys were "former" paratroopers which are civilians now (Russia has draft system so amount of former paratroopers after 2 years service is relatively high)

    Airborne troops are elite troops, soldiers of these troops had best training including hand-to-hand fight and they are VERY PROUD that they are members of Airborne troops. They have distinctive sign - striped vest and pale blue beret which they dress every August, 2nd.

    These guys drunk alcohol with other paratroopers and some part of them (only some part) is very aggressive and there are many incidents with these guys on August, 2nd. Police tries to do all what is possible but it is difficult task because paratroopers have good hand-to-hand fight training and suppose that AIRBORNE TROOPS ARE BEST and that it is their day. So it is more correct to not walk in this day in places where these guys can be. But if you met with them so you have to not provoke them on conflict. Western journalist was lucky that they didn't beat, if he described correctly how did he behave.

    And I amazed that Western journalist doesn't know about "Day of Airborne troops".

    I imagine what Western spectators think about Russian soldiers after reading of such articles.

  • #2
    Another hazard on Moscow's sometimes mean streets are aggressive drunks, particularly servicemen who find themselves on leave in the capital and go on massive benders. With musclebound, tattoo-infested arms bursting from their striped, sleeveless tops, these men are best avoided if you're not Russian.

    Clutching cheap cans of the Russian equivalent of Special Brew, they stagger about the place singing patriotic songs, pawing the local talent and leering at anyone who makes eye contact. It doesn't matter what you wear or how tightly you keep your mouth shut, they always seem to spot that you're not one of them.

    I was recently surrounded by a trio of drunken military men (at a jacket potato stand, needless to say) who appeared to have been imbibing for the previous 24 hours. "You foreigner," they cried. "Do you know who we are? We're paratroopers."

    "I bet you haven't done your military service," one challenged, grabbing the counter for support. Another started to jab me in the ribs and push me about as if I were an animal that needed rounding up, which is quite possibly how they perceived me. I didn't stick around to find out what would happen next, but I got the distinct impression that morale in Russia's armed forces could be higher.
    I sure hope this 'journalist' wasn't saying that these former Airborne troops were like the rabid dogs there. I can attest personally to the character of Russian Airborne forces, having worked and drank a few beers with them. If he was, I'd love to join them in finding this writer and introducing him to my boot heel.
    Stay Alert, Stay Alive!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jim H. Moreno
      I sure hope this 'journalist' wasn't saying that these former Airborne troops were like the rabid dogs there. I can attest personally to the character of Russian Airborne forces, having worked and drank a few beers with them. If he was, I'd love to join them in finding this writer and introducing him to my boot heel.
      I've had the pleasure to work with Russian Police officers in Kosovo and they were all good guys and hard workers. :thumb:
      http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

      Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, my uncle have just sold one of his houses (in Montenegros coast) to one Russian (from Moskva). He was in Moscow 7 days and he liked it so much - now he wants to buy apartment there.
        He always talk:"Do you know how big is Lomonosov;and streets?"
        My colleague was living in Moscow several years and he was student of VGIK (for film director). He almost cries when he talks about Russia, he says: "It is great town. You have everything. If you go out without money, you can have great time. If you go in fancy places - great time again..." Another two of my friends were driving bicikles from Moskva till Vladivostok (few years ago) - it was great adventur. Sibir... And they had not one incident! It is long story... and they had also great time!
        Thay all liked ordinary people...
        Donít forget 1389 Battle for Kosovo.
        Donít forget 1912 Kumanovo battle, revenge for Kosovo.
        Donít forget 1999 Battle for Kosovo II
        Donít forget weíll revenge it again.

        Comment


        • #5
          Look this

          http://www.thenation.com/doc.mhtml?i=20050131&s=cohen

          Comment


          • #6
            Unbelievable Why are some wanting to restart the Cold War. I am going away for a week but will write more when I return.

            Comment


            • #7
              Sometimes i feel as if im the only one in the west who is not completely ignorant.
              Unfortuanatley those arent the only articles ive seen like that. People take any chance the get to pounce on Russia.

              Here is one article
              "The average Russian soldier is sick and hungry, according to a report by Human Rights Watch in Moscow.
              Conscript soldiers, the reports says, are routinely denied access to adequate food and medical care.


              The report says hunger and disease weaken Russian troops
              Human Rights Watch is calling on the Russian government to examine the findings, warning that poor nutrition threatens the military's fighting strength.

              The Russian army drafts almost 500,000 young men each year, but it is beset by problems including desertion, draft dodging and hazing.

              The official diet for a Russian conscript looks healthy enough: the long ration list includes meat and dairy produce, as well as a daily dose of fresh fruit and vegetables.

              But Human Rights Watch says soldiers are routinely denied that food, or served rotten produce crawling with bugs. As a consequence, it says, the Russian army is sick.

              The report is the result of more than one hundred interviews conducted across Russia.

              Its authors admit their methods are not scientific, but argue that their task is to highlight an extremely serious problem.

              'Mismanagement'

              Anna Neistat, the organisation's director in Moscow, believes the problems stem from corruption and a lack of accountability.

              She says much of the money and produce allocated to the military doesn't appear to get through to the conscripts.

              In an interview with the BBC, a defence ministry spokesman admitted the possibility of what he called 'local mismanagement'.

              He said that was a matter for prosecutors but denied there was any large-scale problem with nutrition.

              Human Rights Watch is calling on the government to step in and monitor the military. It also suggesta appointing an army ombudsman to protect conscripts' basic rights.

              Problems in the Russian army are nothing new, but these latest findings are likely to make sober reading for the current batch of conscripts waiting for their call-up papers this month.

              The report, which is entitled 'To serve without health', has been submitted to the authorities in Moscow and should be considered by the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights on Monday. "



              Last edited by Slava45; 08 Feb 05, 21:36.

              Comment


              • #8
                heres another one

                "On 5 September 1999 Russian armed forces launched a new bombing campaign against the small Caucasian republic of Chechnya. The campaign began three months before elections to the Russian State Duma are due on 19.12.1999. Russia is waging this war on the pretext of combatting alleged "terrorism". The horrific bombings in Moscow and Volgodonsk which cost the lives of more than 300 people bear the signs of Chechen involvement, according to the Russian Government's propaganda. No such involvement has so far been proved.

                Shortly before the bombings and the renewed Russian onslaught on Chechnya it was learned that the American and Swiss authorities were investigating money-laundering and the misappropriation of international assistance amounting to billions of dollars by the Russian Government. Russian experts and observers have therefore expressed their suspicion that the second Chechnya war has been embarked upon, just like the first was in 1994, in order to distract attention from internal problems. Yelena Bonner, the widow of the Soviet civil rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Andrei Sakharov, accuses the Russian leadership of using the new Chechen war to cover up internal problems.

                The Russian government, under the leadership of former KGB officer Vladimir Putin, openly acknowledges that it intends to reoccupy the whole of Chechnya and remove the elected government of Chechen President Aslan Maskhadov. The former Russian governmental human rights representative Sergei Kovalyov, forced from office by Boris Yeltsin because of his criticism of the first Chechen war, described the Russian bombing war in Chechnya as deliberately targeted racially-motivated "effective ethnic cleansing" on the part of the Putin Government.

                Sealing of the Chechnyan frontier in 1999 by Russian forces, obstruction of humanitarian aid .: to top :.

                On 5.9.1999 the Russian airforce commenced a new round of bombing attacks on towns and villages in Chechnya. By 1.11.1999 according to various international aid and human rights organisations approximately 200,000 Chechens had fled into neighbouring Ingushetia and southern Russia to escape the Russian bombing. The same number are believed to be on the move inside Chechnya. This brings the total number of refugees to between 350,000 and 400,000, half the population of Chechnya. Between 5.9.1999 and 6.11.1999 the Russian government spent 390 million US dollars on its military operatoin.

                On 23.10.1999 the Russian army sealed off the borders of Chechnya. On 31.10.1999 the main road linking Chechnya with Georgia, to the south was bombed and rendered impassable. Earlier some 2,500 refugees - all of them women, children and the very old - had used this route for their escape by dramatic marches on foot lasting many days over the high mountains to Shatili in Georgia. According to the Berlin-based German-Caucasian Society, they were bombed by the Russian air force as they were fleeing.

                According to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), at the beginning of November 1999 thousands of refugees were waiting, in snow and rain, in a column stretching 15 kilometres on the Chechen side of the border with Ingushetia to be allowed to leave. On 2.11.1999 the Ingushetian president Ruslan Auschew warned of a further 100,000 refugees arriving if Russian troops stormed the Chechen capital Grozny. On 3.11.1999 the UNHCR told of 150,000 more refugees trying to enter Ingushetia.

                For weeks international relief agencies have been unable to gain access to Chechnya. Not once has a doctor or nurse been allowed to cross the frontier. Thousands of the elderly, the weak and infirm and the poor are still inside Chechnya, either because they have insufficient strength to get to the border or because they are unable to find the money needed to pay the levy of over 60 US dollars charged by the Russian border guards in order to allow people through. The Russian Deputy Prime Minister Valentina Matvienko has denied that these desperate people were refugees.

                Russian carpet bombing .: to top :.

                Chechen cities, towns and villages such as Grozny, Gudermes, Shali, Sernovodsk, etc., have been subjected to systematic bombardment on a daily basis by the Russian air force and artillery. The people left behind in Grozny are living in dark, chilly basements, terrified by the unceasing onslaught. They have no drinking water, no electricity, no fuel, no food, and no medical care.

                Even the hospitals have no running water or electricity. Almost nothing can be done to help the sick and infirm. The 17 pumping stations in Grozny have no electricity and cannot be operated. According to the British aid organisation HALO Trust it is impossible to venture out onto the street because of continuous Russian bombardment. Three of the organisation's workers were killed in a rocket attack. According to the Russian human rights activist Yelena Bonner, dozens of people, mostly women and children, are dying every day from their injuries, exhaustion and the cold.

                Contradicting Russian government claims, Chechen and international human rights groups and journalists report that Russian attacks have been directed against civilians and civilian targets. Artillery, jet fighters and rockets have all been deployed. Refugees have reported Russian helicopter gunships firing at anything that moved. The Chechen Deputy Prime Minister Kazbek Makhashev has accused the Russian air force of using cars and other vehicles as live targets. The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) spokesperson Lyndall Sachs has accused the Russian military of using refugees almost as if they were hostages.

                As a result of the bombing of industrial plants, the German-Caucasian Society considers that Chechnya is being threatened with serious long-term ecological damage. The Sunzha and the Terek, which flow into the Caspian Sea, are reported to have been polluted as a result of the damage to chemical installations. The possible hazards arising from the bombing of a complex near Grozny that was reportedly used to store atomic waste are incalculable.

                The Grozny market massacre .: to top :.

                During the late afternoon of 21.10.1999 (at around 5 p.m.) Russian forces fired eight rockets into the crowded central market place of the Chechen capital of Grozny. The Russian television station NTV reported that 188 people had been killed and over 400 injured. According to a report produced by the Chechen human rights activist Z.G. the great majority of the victims were women out doing their shopping. The rockets used in the attack were ground-to-ground missiles. Most of the casualties were caused by the second and third rockets, one of which hit a bus while the other landed in the middle of the crowd.

                On 22.10.1999 the Russian Defence Ministry and Prime Minister Vladimir Putin denied any attack on the market place in Grozny had taken place. According to the Russian government's spokesperson Aleksandr Mikhailov, the Chechens exploded a bomb in the market place themselves, in order to bring pressure to bear on the summit meeting taking place between Russia and the European Union. However, according to a report from the news broadcaster NBC, American satellites belonging to the "Defense Support Program (DSP)" had observed the Russian rocket attacks on Grozny.

                The President of Chechnya's neighbour, Ingushetia, Ruslan Aushev, also challenged Moscow's account. The Government in Moscow fired tactical missiles of the Tochka-U-Type, Aushev claimed on 25.10.1999. According to Aushev the precision strike had probably been intended to hit the Chechen General Staff, which had been meeting nearby, and had missed the target. According to the testimony of survivors of the massacre questioned by the American human rights organisation Human Rights Watch, the Chechen guerrilla leader Shamil Basayev had apparently set up a major command post in the vicinity of the market place. This would constitute just as serious a violation of the Geneva Conventions as the Russian rocket attack on the crowded market place. In a discussion programme broadcast by the Russian television station NTV on 28.10.1999 the Russian General Shamanov admitted that the rockets involved could only be fired on the orders of the highest authority.

                Bombing of vehicles with Red Cross markings .: to top :.

                According to the International Red Cross in Geneva, 25 people were killed, including two Red Cross workers and children, on 29.10.1999 when the Russian air force attacked a refugee convoy near the village of Shami-Yurt. 70 people were reportedly injured. The convoy comprised a convoy of 5 vehicles. All the vehicles were clearly marked with the symbol of the Red Cross. The Russian army dismissed the accusation and claimed that the vehicles were troop carriers transporting Chechen fighters. In an official statement issued the same day the ICRC rejected this story. A reporter from AP who subsequently went to examine the site found burned-out civilian vehicles, as well as cookers, refrigerators and other household items.

                Shooting of civilians, looting and robbery of refugees by Russian forces in the conquered area of Chechnya .: to top :.

                Society for Threatened Peoples (STP) has received a report produced by the Chechen human rights organisation "Women of the North Caucasus" telling how Russian forces have apparently been executing civilians in the areas under their control. In the "Naurski Raion" and "Gorogorski Raion" areas during the last week of October 1999 a "cleansing" operation was carried out, accompanied by house searches and looting. In the "Naurski Raion" area an eyewitness saw 80 men being shot on 28.10.1999. The Chechen human rights organisation also reported that the Russian troops had forced refugees to take all their clothes off and then told them to hand over their valuables. The pretext for this was said to be that the refugees had allegedly been carrying weapons.

                STP fears that Russia has been setting up concentration camps in the reconquered area for Chechens of military-service age, as it did before in 1994-1996. Then hundreds of Chechens aged 14 and over were brutally tortured in "filtering camps" and executed. Mass graves such as that located in the notorious Camp PAP-1 in Grozny could not be excavated because the departing Russian armed forces had mined them when they left in 1996.

                Violations of international humanitarian law on the Chechen side .: to top :.

                STP has however also received the first unconfirmed reports that Chechen paramilitary units have been forcibly preventing men of military-service age from leaving the country and recruiting them under compulsion into the defence forces. If these reports are true, the Chechen commanders must be held accountable for a violation of the Geneva Conventions. STP is also very seriously concerned to learn that Chechen troops may have established military positions and bases next to civilian facilities. That would be a very serious violation of the Geneva Convention prohibiting the abusive use of civilians as human shields."

                Comment


                • #9
                  To Slava

                  If I remember all my discussion about Chechnya they would be about a small book. So, I paused my activity on this field, as I need to pay more time to WW2 materials.....

                  Heh, I have some doubts if I can upload current update on planned Feb. 15....
                  If you fire a rifle at the past, the future will fire a cannon at you.....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Short article (in Russian) about the latest interview of Basaev to the 4th Channel of GB TV

                    http://www.izvestia.ru/columnist/article1168346
                    If you fire a rifle at the past, the future will fire a cannon at you.....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The last article is a good example of a Western propaganda war against Russia.

                      The author of the article "forgot" to mention that in August of 1999 a few thousand of well-trained ans well-equipped Chechen bandits invaded in Dagestan, a Russian Muslim Region.

                      Look this, I wrote a small article about Chechen War.
                      http://war-forums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11326

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Andrey
                        The last article is a good example of a Western propaganda war against Russia.

                        The author of the article "forgot" to mention that in August of 1999 a few thousand of well-trained ans well-equipped Chechen bandits invaded in Dagestan, a Russian Muslim Region.

                        Look this, I wrote a small article about Chechen War.
                        http://war-forums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11326
                        Absolutely agree with Andrey....
                        If you fire a rifle at the past, the future will fire a cannon at you.....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I forgot to mention that the most part of the content of the last article is false.

                          And if to say some more about the invasion in Dagestan so it was not a single raid, it was large scale invasion. Chechens captured a significant part of Dagestan and Russian Army used all its might for liberating this land. Russian Army and groups of local volunteers had a one and a half month battle against Chechens in Dagestan.

                          So the picture of the events was the following. Chechnya was practically independent. Then Chechens invaded in Dagestan and declared that they want to build a Muslim State on the base of some Muslim republics of Russia. During this invasion the Chechens began to blow up houses with sleeping habitants in different cities of Russia, they wanted to intimidate the Russian population.

                          Maskhadov refused to give the command to stop that aggression.

                          When Russian Army and the groups of Dagestan civilian volunteers
                          had repelled the Chechen invasion in Dagestan the Russian rule had to decide what to do later. Chechen bandits retreated on the territory of Chechnya. Maskhadov refused to guarantee that such an invasion will not repeat itself in future and he didn't control enough Chechnya for realizing of such the agreement. So the Russian rule decided to come in Chechnya, to destroy the nest of terrorists and to organize a peaceful life in Chechnya.

                          So the Chrchen invasion in Dagestan was the main reason of the Second Chechen Campaign.

                          To forget to say about the Chechen invasion in Dagestan in 1999 is the same to forget to say about the Japanese attack on Pearl-Harbour!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes, it seems that some people have an agenda in mind when they write about Russia. While there certainly are problems - probably rather more than in the average Western nation, considerable progress has been made, and people need to understand that it is 14 years after the fall of the Soviet Union, and that some problems will take many years to address. I will be visiting Russia next year, and have very positive feelings of what I will find.
                            Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
                            (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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