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  • Cool, is Alka only available from petershop.com? I don't want to order anything from overseas with the dollar being so low to the Euro. I have Torpedo Bombers in my netflix que.

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    • Hi Vitaly

      Originally posted by Vitaly View Post
      What do you mean !!! ??? :-)))

      Please do not feel offended by my assumptions, they are just assumptions.

      I am currently making English SRT-subtitles for "Torpedo bombers" movie. Got some troubles with a correct translation of Russian military commands into English. Could anybody here help me, pls? The list is short:

      Why not make english subtitles for russian movies, that do not have any.
      That would be much more helpful for the english speaking filmfans.
      I'm not gonna watch "Torpednosty" again, because theu have better subtitles now. I would watch this very good movie again, but for other reasons.

      Stanovis! = In formation!
      Rovnyajs' = Ready!
      Smirno! = Attention!
      Zdravstvujte, tovarishi! = ?
      Zdravija zhelaem, Comrade X! = ?
      Razreshite vstat' v stroj? =
      Razojdis'! = ?
      All I know, is that Tovarishi means Kinship-Friend.

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      • Originally posted by Emil_G View Post
        Cool, is Alka only available from petershop.com? I don't want to order anything from overseas with the dollar being so low to the Euro. I have Torpedo Bombers in my netflix que.
        I don't know, I'm not a sales-manager for this movie, and if euro $ 7.99 =
        US $ 13.49 is to nuch for you, why bother.

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        • Originally Posted by Konzev: All I know, is that Tovarishi means Kinship-Friend.
          "Tovarishi" is the plural form. The single one is "Tovarish". It is usually translated as "comrade/comrades".

          Originally Posted by Emil_G: ... I have Torpedo Bombers in my netflix que.
          If you have this movie on hand, could you pls have a look how these phrases are translated there. They all sound between minutes 7 and 10, when Lieutenant colonel Fomenko receives an order for his last attack.

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          • Originally posted by Vitaly View Post
            Stanovis! = In formation!
            Rovnyajs' = Ready!
            Smirno! = Attention!
            Zdravstvujte, tovarishi! = ?
            Zdravija zhelaem, Comrade X! = ?
            Razreshite vstat' v stroj? =
            Razojdis'! = ?
            I'd rather interpret these commands as
            Stanovis! = Fall in!
            Rovnyajs' = Eyes Right!
            Smirno! = Ready Front!
            Razojdis'! = Dismissed!

            I don't know exact equivalents of other expressions, sorry. Perhaps it would be better if you have explained their meanings for our friends who don't speak russian. I can offer offer some phrase which seem close by meaning - may someone make them more appropriate.

            Zdravstvujte, tovarishi! = Good morning/afternoon/evening, comrades! (Higher rank to others in formation)
            Zdravija zhelaem, Comrade X! = Good morning/afternoon/evening, Comrade X! (answer)
            Razreshite vstat' v stroj? = Sir, may I join the ranks, sir? (latecomer? )

            May it helps a bit

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            • Vitaly, I don't have the movie yet but here is how I would translate some of these, now I think there might be more correct military catch-phrases for these but I will give the literal translation if I can't think of one. Rambow did a great job on the first half, but I would say the other ones are:

              Zdravstvujte, tovarishi! = Greetings comrades!
              Zdravija zhelaem, Comrade X! = literally it means 'good health comrade'
              Razreshite vstat' v stroj? = Permission to fall in line.
              Razojdis'! = Disperse

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              • Thanks a lot, Rambow and Emil_G! This helps! Initially, I tried to find in Internet some ready translations for these military catch-phrases. But it looks like there is no one file about this! (I mean, for Russian-English translations). My electronic dictionary (Abby Lingvo 10) fails also for this...

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                • Originally posted by Emil_G View Post
                  Vitaly, I don't have the movie yet but here is how I would translate some of these, now I think there might be more correct military catch-phrases for these but I will give the literal translation if I can't think of one. Rambow did a great job on the first half, but I would say the other ones are:

                  Zdravstvujte, tovarishi! = Greetings comrades!
                  Zdravija zhelaem, Comrade X! = literally it means 'good health comrade'
                  Razreshite vstat' v stroj? = Permission to fall in line.
                  Razojdis'! = Disperse
                  Hmmm...

                  - Zdravstvujte, tovarishi! = Greetings comrades!
                  - Zdravija zhelaem, Comrade X! = literally it means 'good health comrade'

                  it is a set of the same phrase - a chief speak the bottom phrase, the subordinates answer the bottom.

                  My Lingvo 10 translates it
                  "Good morning, afternoon, evening, comrades!"
                  "Good morning, afternoon, evening, sir!"

                  - Razreshite vstat' v stroj? = Permission to fall in line.

                  It is not a noun. I think "Let me fall in" or "May I fall in?" is more correct.

                  - Razojdis'! = Disperse

                  I think Dismissed is better.
                  As I think Disperse means Rassredotiochitsia

                  EDIT: You can look the most of these terms in subtitles to "72 meters"
                  Last edited by Andrey; 30 Nov 07, 02:30.

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                  • Well, we can argue language semantics all day I suppose. I mean when I translate I don't think of the most literal or word for word translations, because those usually come out obtuse. I think of more in terms of "what would a person in an English language setting use to convey the same meaning" - this is where I think "Permission to fall in" is better then saying "may I fall in?" or "let me fall in" because in an English speaking army a soldier wouldn't talk to his CO this way, he would say "permission to fall in line sir!" or "Permission to speak freely" not "can I speak freely" or "can I fall line" that sounds too informal.

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                    • 1612 Reviews

                      Not really a WW2 topic, but I didn't know where else to put it. Has anyone seen "1612"? Here in the states, it's reported as more or less a political campaign film for Putin (sounds like sort of an updated Eisenstein's "Alexander Nevsky" just set at the Time of Troubles/early Romanov era rather than the Novgorod days).

                      Is the film good? Reasonably accurate (within the limits of a film)? The few clips I've seen looks like it was well made.
                      "There are only two professions in the world in which the amateur excels the professional. One, military strategy, and, two, prostitution."
                      -- Maj. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower

                      (Avatar: Commodore Edwin Ward Moore, Republic of Texas Navy)

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                      • 1612 Reviews
                        This movie has already been discussed on pages 30 and 31 of this thread. I have not seen it yet. Most of the published reviews say that the movie is not so good :-(

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                        • I see. Well, I'll probably check it out eventually. There are so very few movies that are strictly realistic that I'd miss a lot of entertainment (good and bad) if I passed on movies that took liberties with their facts (e.g., "Glory," "Apocalypse Now," "Full Metal Jacket," "Saving Private Ryan," "Patton," and several others).
                          "There are only two professions in the world in which the amateur excels the professional. One, military strategy, and, two, prostitution."
                          -- Maj. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower

                          (Avatar: Commodore Edwin Ward Moore, Republic of Texas Navy)

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                          • Thank you all who helped me with the translations for "Torpedo bombers"! I put the subtitles here: http://subs.com.ru/page.php?id=5029&a=dl

                            The movie itself can be downloaded from here: http://film.arjlover.net/film/torpedonostsy.avi (for IPs detected as not Russian, this server allows downloading only between 04:00 and 10:10 Moscow time).

                            I am quite agree with AMVAS (see his post several pages above) that this is the great movie! For me, the impression was like that of "Cold summer of 1953"...

                            P.S.: tech. details of the combined use of external subtitles and avi-files can be obtained in my post on page 22 of this thread.
                            Last edited by Vitaly; 02 Dec 07, 10:48.

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                            • Wow Vitaly, that site has like 100's of movies!!! Thanks!

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                              • Not at all, Emil. Unfortunately, it has only Russian interface...

                                BTW, page http://subs.com.ru/list.php?c=engrusubtitles contains lots of subtitles for Soviet/Russian movies, including many military movies.

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