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  • Thanks Andrey, I knew you would get it! So is it worth looking out for and watching, I would value your opinion.
    Wolster

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    • Originally posted by Wolster View Post
      Thanks Andrey, I knew you would get it! So is it worth looking out for and watching, I would value your opinion.
      It is a comedy about 3 people who don't undestand each other. In one place occurred a Carelian woman, speaking in a native language, the Finn, speaking in Finnisn and a Soviet officer, speaking in Russian only.

      The most curious situations are connected with thelanguage problems.

      For example, the Finn tried to introduce himself and to know the nane of the Soviet: he pointed a finger at himself and said his name, then he pointed the finger at the Soviet. The Soviet answered: "Poshiol ty..., fashist prokliatyi" (the first words were heard as "pshiol ty") He saw a SS-man befre him and his phrase meant... hmmm.... I can to translate it as a soft form of "F**k you, damned Nazi". The Finn and the woman decided it was the name of the Soviet and called him "Pshiol ty".

      In another scene the Soviet shows to the Finn a photo of Esenin, a famous Soviet poet and speaks (in Russian) that he met with Esenin. The Finn sees on the photo and speaks (in Finnish): "Oh, yes, your wife is very pretty" (Esenin had very young pretty face with frizzy hair)

      It is a kind comedy about cooperation of ordinary people of countries-enemies but I don't know how it will be understandable for the people who don't know Russian and can't see the curious things in those language problems.

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      • Its OK Andrey. My Russian is bad but I can understand the scene well. Cinema has its own language that people around the world could understand the same.

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        • Originally posted by DANNGOC View Post
          Its OK Andrey. My Russian is bad but I can understand the scene well. Cinema has its own language that people around the world could understand the same.
          You are right Danngoc. So long as you have subtitles in a language you understand, it is funny and enjoyable. According to English subtitles, the Finn thought the Soviet's name was Getlost. Perhaps the translators moderated the language a bit.
          Did the Finns really leave some of their soldiers chained to rocks dressed in SS clothes armed with weapons - to hold up advances presumably?
          The Finnish character was particularly reourceful and energetic!

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          • Originally Posted by Dave T:
            ...Did the Finns really leave some of their soldiers chained to rocks dressed in SS clothes armed with weapons - to hold up advances presumably?
            Finns themselves? - No, I'm sure 99.999% :-) In the movie this was done by a German withdrawal group. I red in some memoirs of WWII veterans that Germans did like this sometimes with Russian collaborators - Vlasovets. So, they could do this also with Finns...

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            • Originally posted by Vitaly View Post
              Finns themselves? - No, I'm sure 99.999% :-) In the movie this was done by a German withdrawal group. I red in some memoirs of WWII veterans that Germans did like this sometimes with Russian collaborators - Vlasovets. So, they could do this also with Finns...
              I'll add that my relative, who took part in WWII as part of the 4th Guards Tank Army, said in the last days of the war in the Sudetenland his unit fought SS men holed up in the mountains who had Vlasov's men in front of them and would shoot them with their machine guns if they didn't defend against the Red Army, this was after May 9th as well.
              "This isn't Paris, you will not get through here with a Marching Parade!" Defenders of Stalingrad
              "Man is the only animal that deals in that atrocity of atrocities, War. He is the only one that gathers his brethren about him and goes forth in cold blood and calm pulse to exterminate his kind. He is the only animal that for sordid wages will march out... and help to slaughter strangers of his own species who have done him no harm and with whom he has no quarrel.... And in the intervals between campaigns he washes the blood off his hands and works for "the universal brotherhood of man" - with his mouth". Mark Twain
              "It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets.Ē Voltaire

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              • Originally posted by Dave T View Post
                You are right Danngoc. So long as you have subtitles in a language you understand, it is funny and enjoyable. According to English subtitles, the Finn thought the Soviet's name was Getlost. Perhaps the translators moderated the language a bit.
                What "getlost" means?

                Have you liked the movie?

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                • Originally Posted by Andrey: What "getlost" means?
                  In this context, "get lost" means "stop taking my attention!", "go away of me!". The most close Russian analogue: "otstyan'!" ("отстань!"). IMHO, it is also a good transtation of "Poshel ty!".

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                  • Originally posted by Andrey View Post
                    What "getlost" means?

                    Have you liked the movie?
                    Vitaly was close enough with the translation
                    I liked the movie alot.
                    I have it in my growing DVD collection, but am now a big fan of memocast.com which allowed me to view Torpedo Bombers with subtitles, and Mir vkhodyashchemu without. I liked both. The latter felt lots older than 1961, good mixing of newsreel footage I guess.
                    Very much enjoyed 72 metres too.
                    Soviet and Russian Kino очень хорошо

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                    • Originally posted by Vitaly View Post
                      In this context, "get lost" means "stop taking my attention!", "go away of me!". The most close Russian analogue: "otstyan'!" ("отстань!"). IMHO, it is also a good transtation of "Poshel ty!".
                      "Otstan" means "I don't want to talk with you, I am too tired, I am too busy and so on "

                      "Poshel ty.." means "I don't want to talk with you, I hate you, I despise you, you are a bastarsd and so on"

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                      • Originally posted by Dave T View Post
                        I have it in my growing DVD collection, but am now a big fan of memocast.com which allowed me to view Torpedo Bombers with subtitles, and Mir vkhodyashchemu without.
                        "Mir vhodiaschemy" ("Peace for a newcomer"). Have you understood what was in the movie? It is the Soviet version of the behavior of the Soviets in Germany.

                        Soviet and Russian Kino очень хорошо
                        "очень хорошЕЕ"

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                        • Originally posted by Andrey View Post
                          "Otstan" means "I don't want to talk with you, I am too tired, I am too busy and so on "

                          "Poshel ty.." means "I don't want to talk with you, I hate you, I despise you, you are a bastarsd and so on"
                          "Get lost" can be either of those. It could be used in a nicer way such as your first example or the more harsh second one depending on who you say it to.
                          Check out our webpage for our NFL picks http://members.cox.net/mjohns59/

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                          • Originally posted by Psycho View Post
                            "Get lost" can be either of those. It could be used in a nicer way such as your first example or the more harsh second one depending on who you say it to.
                            Thanks for explanation

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                            • Originally posted by Dave T View Post
                              Vitaly was close enough with the translation
                              I liked the movie alot.
                              I have it in my growing DVD collection, but am now a big fan of memocast.com which allowed me to view Torpedo Bombers with subtitles, and Mir vkhodyashchemu without. I liked both. The latter felt lots older than 1961, good mixing of newsreel footage I guess.
                              Very much enjoyed 72 metres too.
                              Soviet and Russian Kino очень хорошо
                              How is about "They fought for the Motherland"?

                              Can you give wider description of your impression from the movies?

                              For example, did "72 metres" change your opinion about modern Russian submariners?

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                              • Originally Posted by Andrey:
                                "Otstan" means "I don't want to talk with you, I am too tired, I am too busy and so on "
                                "Poshel ty.." means "I don't want to talk with you, I hate you, I despise you, you are a bastarsd and so on"
                                Finally, there is more similarity in "and so on..." than differences:-) Also, this sort of lexicon is very dependent on a particular situation, inflexion, etc. For example, let me cite famous Soviet movie "Kin-dza-dza": "Lusenka, darling, pest, it seems to you these... macaroni!" ("Люсенька, родная, зараза, сдались тебе эти... макароны!")

                                So, in some situations, "Poshel ty..." can mean the same as "Otstan". Well, in St.Petersburg it is like this; maybe in Omsk it differs:-)
                                Last edited by Vitaly; 10 Jun 07, 11:16.

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