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Books about troops marching from Siberia to Moscow

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  • Books about troops marching from Siberia to Moscow

    Are there any books in English about the Red Army soldiers who started marching from Siberia at the start of the War, and arrived just in time for the battle of Moscow? I've always been interested in what that must have been like, marching all those months thinking about the fact you were probably going to go into battle as soon as you got there. I'd be interested in either fiction or non-fiction.

    Thanks

  • #2
    I think they were shipped by train not walking.

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    • #3
      Maybe it's a mistake that has been repeated in different books, but I have read many times something like, referring to the Battle of Moscow -
      and the Russian attack was spearheaded by fresh, warmly dressed, Siberian Soldiers who had started marching the day of the invasion and went right into battle when they arrived.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
        Maybe it's a mistake that has been repeated in different books, but I have read many times something like, referring to the Battle of Moscow -
        and the Russian attack was spearheaded by fresh, warmly dressed, Siberian Soldiers who had started marching the day of the invasion and went right into battle when they arrived.
        Ha-ha-ha.....
        Thank you for a good portion of humor...


        "started marching the day of the invasion and went right into battle when they arrive" will become one of the most funny things I ever heard... Together with T-34-85 and IS tanks in the Kursk battle...
        Tell me what the authors were drinking during writing about such things

        No, of course nobody tried to make march from Siberia on foot.
        All the troops were moved by trains. In some urgent cases by airplanes...

        Regards
        Alex
        If you fire a rifle at the past, the future will fire a cannon at you.....

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by amvas View Post
          All the troops were moved by trains. In some urgent cases by airplanes...
          Don't forget riding bears
          www.histours.ru

          Siege of Leningrad battlefield tour

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ShAA View Post
            Don't forget riding bears
            “For there is nothing more serious than a lunatic when he comes to the central point of his lunacy.”

            Max Sterner

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            • #7
              The only items I've read about this describes the 'Siberian' formations as mostly trained cades of officers and technicians taking on reservists from western USSR. The Volga or Urals regions. Exact numbers were not given, but I infered 50% or more of the the men in these Siberian formations were called up from provinces west of the Urals.

              Comment


              • #8
                There were actually two sets of troops that participated in the battle of Moscow that came from 'Siberia'. First, in early October 1941 several divisions were moved west from the Far Eastern Front and TransBaikal. These were prewar divisions, still at the big prewar shtat with 15,000 men and, in several cases, there ow tank battalions. These are the units that, like the 78th Rifle Division and 32nd Rifle Division, stopped the German spearheads west of Moscow in mid and late October.
                The second, and larger, group were the divisions formed in July- August 1941 in the Urals, Siberian, and Central Asia Military Districts. The first two districts, along with TransBaikal, comprise the geographical area usually referred to in the west as "Siberia". These divisions, with a few early exceptions like the 316th Rifle Division from Central Aia, arrived in time to form the bulk of the troops making the great Moscow Offensive in December 1941 - January 1942. While some of these troops may have been 'dressed for the winter', they were by no means well equipped or well trained. In fact, they were formed after the normal reserves had all been called up, and comprised mostly untrained civilians and reserve officers: Golikov's memoirs have a pretty descriptive account of the status of the divisions from this group that made up his new 10th Army in November when it was forming up southeast of Moscow.
                The only thing these units had going for them, unlike the 'old Far Easterners', who were well trained and equipped, was that the Germans didn't have a clue that they existed: in mid-October the German command was convinced that after the encirclements at Vyazma and Bryansk there was nothing left of the Red Army, and further operations in the Moscow area would be a cake walk into Moscow, fighting the weather and roads more than any human enemy. They were considerably shocked when army after army of reserves appeared on their maps after 5 December!
                The other positive going for these people, was that the Red Army had a very well developed winter warfare doctrine and set of winter warfare equipment. Ironically, much of this came about because of the debacle of the Winter War with Finland. After that episode, a commission wrote an entirely new manual on winter and arctic warfare for the RKKA, which was issued in May 1941. You can make a pretty good case that if it were not for the poor showing by the Red Army in Finland, Hitler might not have been as enthusiastic about attacking the USSR and the Red Army would not have been as effective in stopping and throwing the Wehrmacht back in that first winter.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
                  ... marching from Siberia at the start of the War, and arrived just in time for the battle of Moscow?
                  Truly priceless!
                  Never heard of this one before.
                  Kind regards
                  Igor

                  * My grandfathers WW2 memoirs - Romania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Hungary, 1944-1945.
                  * On the question of "2 mil. rapes" by RKKA
                  * Verdicts of RKKA Military Tribunals for crimes against civilians in 1945

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sharposhnikov View Post
                    There were actually two sets of troops that participated in the battle of Moscow that came from 'Siberia'. First, in early October 1941 several divisions were moved west from the Far Eastern Front and TransBaikal. These were prewar divisions, still at the big prewar shtat with 15,000 men and, in several cases, there ow tank battalions. These are the units that, like the 78th Rifle Division and 32nd Rifle Division, stopped the German spearheads west of Moscow in mid and late October.
                    The second, and larger, group were the divisions formed in July- August 1941 in the Urals, Siberian, and Central Asia Military Districts. The first two districts, along with TransBaikal, comprise the geographical area usually referred to in the west as "Siberia". These divisions, with a few early exceptions like the 316th Rifle Division from Central Aia, arrived in time to form the bulk of the troops making the great Moscow Offensive in December 1941 - January 1942. While some of these troops may have been 'dressed for the winter', they were by no means well equipped or well trained. In fact, they were formed after the normal reserves had all been called up, and comprised mostly untrained civilians and reserve officers: Golikov's memoirs have a pretty descriptive account of the status of the divisions from this group that made up his new 10th Army in November when it was forming up southeast of Moscow.
                    The only thing these units had going for them, unlike the 'old Far Easterners', who were well trained and equipped, was that the Germans didn't have a clue that they existed: in mid-October the German command was convinced that after the encirclements at Vyazma and Bryansk there was nothing left of the Red Army, and further operations in the Moscow area would be a cake walk into Moscow, fighting the weather and roads more than any human enemy. They were considerably shocked when army after army of reserves appeared on their maps after 5 December!
                    The other positive going for these people, was that the Red Army had a very well developed winter warfare doctrine and set of winter warfare equipment. Ironically, much of this came about because of the debacle of the Winter War with Finland. After that episode, a commission wrote an entirely new manual on winter and arctic warfare for the RKKA, which was issued in May 1941. You can make a pretty good case that if it were not for the poor showing by the Red Army in Finland, Hitler might not have been as enthusiastic about attacking the USSR and the Red Army would not have been as effective in stopping and throwing the Wehrmacht back in that first winter.
                    Fascinating stuff, thanks
                    Is there any more information in the shape of books (or Internet links) to be found?
                    BoRG

                    You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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