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  • The Death of Stalin

    I have always though that Stalin death is a good example of why it is not a good idea when elderly and in poor health, to make your guards so fearfully of you that will not interpurt you and also an example of why you should not put your doctor in jail.

    Stalin had suffered a series of minor strokes before 1953 and was generally in declining health. On the night of February 28th he watched a film at the Kremlin, then returned to his dacha, where he met with several prominent subordinates including Beria, head of the NKVD (secret police) and Khrushchev, who would eventually succeed Stalin. They left at 4:00 am, with no suggestion that Stalin was in poor health. Stalin then went to bed, but only after saying the guards could go off duty and that they werenít to wake him.

    Stalin would usually alert his guards before 10:00 am and ask for tea, but no communication came. The guards grew worried, but were forbidden from waking Stalin and could only wait: there was no one in the Dacha who could counter Stalinís orders. A light came on in the room around 18:30, but still no call. Eventually, plucking up the courage to go in and using the arrived post as an excuse, a guard entered the room at 22:00 and found Stalin lying on the floor in a pool of urine. He was helpless and unable to speak, and his broken watch showed he had fallen at 18:30.

    A Delay in Treatment:
    The guards felt they didnít have the right authority to call for a doctor, indeed many of Stalinís doctors were the target of a new purge. So instead they called the Minister of State Security. He also felt he didnít have the right powers and called Beria. Exactly what happened next is still not fully understood, but Beria and other leading Russians delayed acting, possibly because they wanted Stalin to die and not include them in the forthcoming purge, possibly because they were scared of seeming to infringe on Stalinís powers should he recover. They only called for doctors sometime between 7:00 and 10:00 the next day after first travelling to the Dacha themselves.

    The doctors found Stalin partially paralysed, breathing with difficulty and vomiting blood. They feared the worst but were unsure. The best doctors in Russia, those which had been treating Stalin, had recently been arrested as part of the forthcoming purge and were in prison. Representatives of the doctors who were free and had seen Stalin went to the prisons to ask for the old doctorsí opinions, who confirmed the initial, negative, diagnoses. Stalin struggled on for several days, eventually dying at 21:50 on March 5th. His daughter said about the event: ďThe death agony was terrible. He literally choked to death as we watched.Ē (Conquest, Stalin: Breaker of Nations, p. 312)
    War is less costly than servitude

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    • #3
      Originally posted by kendrick View Post
      Conquest, Stalin: Breaker of Nations, p. 312
      - maybe go and get a correct information instead of reading fiction books?...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by kendrick View Post
        I have always though that Stalin death is a good example of why it is not a good idea when elderly and in poor health, to make your guards so fearfully of you that will not interpurt you and also an example of why you should not put your doctor in jail.
        I would think that the lesson to be learnt is not to be a homocidal maniac who decides to alienate those that are closest to him after they have seen the way you have dealt with others in the same position.

        There will never be proof of this but it is considered most likely that Beria had him killed. Not only were the guards changed (who Beria was in control of) but Beria gloated on Stalins death bed and apparently claimed credit for his death afterwards.
        Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

        That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

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        • #5
          He didn't last much loner either, getting executed by Malenkov and Molotov.
          I guess he wouldn't swallow the dioxin soup.
          " Gentlemen , you can't fight in here! This is the War Room" :
          President Mirkin Muffley, in Dr. Strangelove.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by kendrick View Post
            I have always though that Stalin death is a good example of why it is not a good idea when elderly and in poor health, to make your guards so fearfully of you that will not interpurt you and also an example of why you should not put your doctor in jail.

            Stalin had suffered a series of minor strokes before 1953 and was generally in declining health. On the night of February 28th he watched a film at the Kremlin, then returned to his dacha, where he met with several prominent subordinates including Beria, head of the NKVD (secret police) and Khrushchev, who would eventually succeed Stalin. They left at 4:00 am, with no suggestion that Stalin was in poor health. Stalin then went to bed, but only after saying the guards could go off duty and that they werenít to wake him.

            Stalin would usually alert his guards before 10:00 am and ask for tea, but no communication came. The guards grew worried, but were forbidden from waking Stalin and could only wait: there was no one in the Dacha who could counter Stalinís orders. A light came on in the room around 18:30, but still no call. Eventually, plucking up the courage to go in and using the arrived post as an excuse, a guard entered the room at 22:00 and found Stalin lying on the floor in a pool of urine. He was helpless and unable to speak, and his broken watch showed he had fallen at 18:30.

            A Delay in Treatment:
            The guards felt they didnít have the right authority to call for a doctor, indeed many of Stalinís doctors were the target of a new purge. So instead they called the Minister of State Security. He also felt he didnít have the right powers and called Beria. Exactly what happened next is still not fully understood, but Beria and other leading Russians delayed acting, possibly because they wanted Stalin to die and not include them in the forthcoming purge, possibly because they were scared of seeming to infringe on Stalinís powers should he recover. They only called for doctors sometime between 7:00 and 10:00 the next day after first travelling to the Dacha themselves.

            The doctors found Stalin partially paralysed, breathing with difficulty and vomiting blood. They feared the worst but were unsure. The best doctors in Russia, those which had been treating Stalin, had recently been arrested as part of the forthcoming purge and were in prison. Representatives of the doctors who were free and had seen Stalin went to the prisons to ask for the old doctorsí opinions, who confirmed the initial, negative, diagnoses. Stalin struggled on for several days, eventually dying at 21:50 on March 5th. His daughter said about the event: ďThe death agony was terrible. He literally choked to death as we watched.Ē (Conquest, Stalin: Breaker of Nations, p. 312)
            Hey even Stalin's story has a happy ending!
            How many Allied tanks it would take to destroy a Maus?
            275. Because that's how many shells there are in the Maus. Then it could probably crush some more until it ran out of gas. - Surfinbird

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            • #7
              There will never be proof of this but it is considered most likely that Beria had him killed. Not only were the guards changed (who Beria was in control of) but Beria gloated on Stalins death bed and apparently claimed credit for his death afterwards.
              This is what I have heard and taken as the most probable version of the truth.
              Love is the triumph of imagination over intelligence.

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