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Contacting David M. Glantz

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  • Contacting David M. Glantz

    I came back because I am currently involved in some serious research and I needed to know if anyone here knows how to contact David Glantz directly. It is regarding the airborne history of the 13th, 35th, and 39th Guards divisions.

    In other news, the last time I was here I was planning to move to Volgogr- Stalingrad(I can't bear to call it by that Khruschevite name!), and work there. Unfortunately, there were some visa issues so I ended up remaining in Moscow. Truly this has actually been better in retrospect.

  • #2
    Glantz's email contact is [email protected].
    Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
      Glantz's email contact is [email protected].
      Thanks.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
        Glantz's email contact is [email protected].
        You may not get a quick answer as he travels back and forth from his teaching job.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Barbarossa View Post
          You may not get a quick answer as he travels back and forth from his teaching job.
          Actually he got back to me pretty promptly. It was probably because it was still summer time when I contacted him.

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          • #6
            Hi Everyone,
            Is Mr. Glantz working on any new books by any chance?
            Thank you,
            Narayan

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            • #7
              Yes he is...

              He came out with After Stalingrad last year.
              Next came To the Gates of Stalingrad, this year
              the next one will be Armageddon in Stalingrad due out in October 09
              then Barbarossa Derailed: The Battles for Smolensk, July-August 1941 in 2010.

              This is a much as I can find.

              Dann

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              • #8
                He's definitly got both feet planted firmly on the Russian Front!

                Just fininished his book on "Zhukov's Greatest Defeat", hell of a good read. And the title certainly fits the subject.
                "Why is the Rum gone?"

                -Captain Jack

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Exorcist View Post
                  "Zhukov's Greatest Defeat", hell of a good read
                  - of course for Americans it's a "good read", since it narrates about Zhukov's "defeat" not his triumph.

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                  • #10
                    Zhukov was unquestionably one of the greatest generals from WW2, but not every operation he planned and executed was ideal. He made mistakes, just like every other general.

                    In studying military history, it is best to recognize all aspects of combat, even failure. The Soviet Union tended to cover-up or disguise its failures and this has distorted our understanding of the war. In this the Soviet Union/Russia are not alone. Most nations are inclined to ignore bad news.

                    Mr. Glantz and other authors/historians are trying to shed light on these overlooked aspects of the GPW. At times, an outsider can see more clearly, and say more freely what needs to be said. In this case Mr. Glantz is doing everyone a great service.

                    So I ask, please open the archives, let us do the research, and tell the story of the GPW as best as we can.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dann Falk View Post
                      an outsider can see more clearly, and say more freely what needs to be said
                      - in hindsight and from the armchair, now it's easy to judge those who had to risk everything...

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                      • #12
                        Not judge, but reveal.

                        If the true, real story could be told, maybe Zhukov and others would be shown to be better generals than we realize.

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                        • #13
                          Dam' few generals dwell on their mistakes. If you have the ego to be a general in the first place, you have too much ego to admit you make mistakes. Especially when those mistakes killed thousand or hundreds of thousands of your own people. Zhukov had the additional advantage that the entire Soviet military-historical apparatus was behind the building of his 'legend', but he's by no means unique in having a one-sided view of his career presented to history: look at German military memoirs and western histories of the German Wehrmacht after WWII for even more flagrant examples of 'glossing over' mistakes and defeats. If you are not even willing to admit that mistakes were made, how can you avoid repeating them?
                          David Glantz's book on the failed Rzhev offensive is his best known, but his "Forgotten Battles" series of monographs hammers constantly on the point that there were whole campaigns on the eastern front that have been ignored by both western and Soviet (but, increasingly, not by modern Russian) historians. His Stalingrad trilogy that is coming out now makes the point - usually overlooked in the western histories of the Stalingrad campaign - that it was the constant grinding battles across Russia throughout July to September 1942 that wore the German Wehrmacht down, not just the fighting in the city itself. In other words, the Red Army and not just distance and Hitler's mistakes contributed to the German disaster right from the start of the campaign. This might seem obvious (to anyone who studies the Soviet-German war in detail) but I don't know of any other non-Russian language history of the 1942 campaigns that ever made that point.
                          Finally, I have heard Glantz say on several occasions that there are other Soviet generals who deserve to be better known and better documented in the west in addition to Zhukov: a really good biography/military historical study of Rokossovskii is long overdue in English, for example. The fact is that to get a major hadback book published on a mlitary history subject in the US you need to attach it to a subject that the general public has heard of, and for the Great Patriotic War (a phrase most Americans have never even heard) that is Stalingrad, Zhukov, and possibly Kursk, Leningrad and Moscow (Battles and Seiges of). Mention the exploits of the 13th Guards Rifle Division to 99.9 % of Americans, even an audience at a major gaming convention full of war game players, and they look at you blankly (been there, done that!)

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                          • #14
                            I must agree with Mr. Sharposhnikov's statement, well said!

                            The point is, WW2 and the GPW are 70 years in the past. Itís about time we all deal with the subject with some detachment. All the leaders and most of the combatants are now gone. This is not about Russia or Germany, itís about history. Right or wrong, good or bad, the full story needs to be told and we should tell it as best we can.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Dann Falk View Post
                              Itís about time we all deal with the subject with some detachment
                              - but what about the historical context?... without it we end up like those critical of, for example, the Holy Inquisition today

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