Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mine Dogs!

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mine Dogs!

    Hello amvas,

    First I would like to applaud your effort.

    I am interested in any information or pictures concerning mine dogs. I know you may not have any since cameras were not as numerous in the Russian army as the German army but I thought I would ask in case I get a little lucky. :thumb:

  • #2
    Re: Mine Dogs!

    Originally posted by Igotmilk™
    Hello amvas,

    First I would like to applaud your effort.

    I am interested in any information or pictures concerning mine dogs. I know you may not have any since cameras were not as numerous in the Russian army as the German army but I thought I would ask in case I get a little lucky. :thumb:

    I saw such a photo, but can't remember where
    Not sure, that I manage to find it ..................

    Also I have read about these dogs, but again, can't remember specific source..........................
    If you fire a rifle at the past, the future will fire a cannon at you.....

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Re: Mine Dogs!

      Originally posted by amvas
      I saw such a photo, but can't remember where
      Not sure, that I manage to find it ..................

      Also I have read about these dogs, but again, can't remember specific source..........................
      I have a few, VERY FEW, pictures of them and a little information. Please do not knock-yourself out. But if you see it when you are reading I would appreciate it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Dog Anti-Tank Mine

        Dog Anti-Tank Mine

        The simplicity of the dog mine must have been appealing concept in 1942 when the Russian army was still hard pressed fighting to keep the German invaders in check. The basic idea was that the dog carried on it's back a wooden box or packets containing explosives strapped on with a harness. The dogs were then trained to run underneath enemy tanks and in doing so they would tip back a vertical wooden lever on their backs, which would detonate the explosives, much to the surprise of the German tank crews and the dogs.

        This however, was one simple idea that did not work terribly effectively in combat. As the dogs were trained by placing food under Soviet tanks they would run to the familiar smells and sounds of any Soviet tanks in battle rather than the strange smells and sounds of the German tanks, and with hindsight, one would also expect that in battle a dog would run anywhere but towards a moving tank firing overhead, and in doing so become a menace to everyone else on the battlefield.

        The German army quickly learned of the Soviet hundminen and so spread throughout the ranks information that all Russian dogs likely to be encountered were probably rabid and so should be shot on sight. As a result all dogs virtually disappeared from the Eastern Front in the ensuing few days, making the use of dog mines all the less feasible.

        Dog mines did have some success, but once their dangerous drawbacks were realised they were not used after 1942. Some reports on the Soviet Army after 1945 still contained references to dog mines however, and there were also reports of dog mines as having been used by the Viet Minh (fighting in Indo-China) in the late 1940s.

        A soviet dog mine in training, or so it would appear. What is interesting about this picture is that although the training tank does not have a real gun, its turret appears to be that of the T-34/85. The T-34/85 was not introduced until 1944, yet dog mines were supposed to have been withdrawn in 1942!
        ( source )






        DESCRIPTION of the Dog-Mine

        The dog mine consists of approximately 12 kg of TNT carried in two canvas pouches, one strapped on each side of a dog. The ignition device is a standard MUV pull fuze inserted in a 200-grammes block at TNT. This makeshift booster is connected to the two main charges by lengths of detonating cord. A spring-loaded wooden lever, projecting vertically above the initiating device, is connected to the pull pin on the MUV fuze. The pin is pulled when the dog crawls under the target. The entire assembly is contained in a harness which is attached to the dog.

        Manufacturing County Former Soviet Union

        Using County Former Soviet Union.
        ( source )


        Regards, Sven

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Dog Anti-Tank Mine

          Thanks Trommelfeuer! I have copies of both those pics, but not as large! I REALLY appreciate it! :thumb:

          Comment


          • #6
            HOLY CRAP!

            I just realized these dogs were not used for mine sniffing. They WERE the mines! I better not let my wife (animal lover) see this thread.

            It's a shame dogs had to be used in that fashion, but it pales next to the millions of humans dying by their side. Definitely a battle to the death on the Eastern Front that no one, and no animal, could escape.

            Thanks for bringing up this topic. I had no idea this exsisted.
            Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

            I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Brian King
              HOLY CRAP!

              I just realized these dogs were not used for mine sniffing. They WERE the mines! I better not let my wife (animal lover) see this thread.

              It's a shame dogs had to be used in that fashion, but it pales next to the millions of humans dying by their side. Definitely a battle to the death on the Eastern Front that no one, and no animal, could escape.

              Thanks for bringing up this topic. I had no idea this exsisted.
              OH Heck yeah!

              Look up "Flame Bats" and the Romans used flaming pigs to disrupt formations and the US still trains and uses Dolphins!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Brian King
                HOLY CRAP!

                I just realized these dogs were not used for mine sniffing. They WERE the mines! I better not let my wife (animal lover) see this thread.

                It's a shame dogs had to be used in that fashion, but it pales next to the millions of humans dying by their side. Definitely a battle to the death on the Eastern Front that no one, and no animal, could escape.

                Thanks for bringing up this topic. I had no idea this exsisted.
                I would also like to add that the last picture was from post 1980!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've found some more photos / info.

                  This is the Russian WWII "believe it or not" Anti-tank dog mine. The dog was affixed with a large demolition charge and conditioned through starving to run under tanks. The dogs would be starved for periods of time before "service" and then be fed only by putting food under a tank. The process was repeated until the dogs were conditioned to run under the tank when released, then they were starved again, fixed with the pictured harness and released on the battlefield when enemy tanks were present. When the dog went under the tank for "food", it triggered the fuze on the dog's back and well you can imagine the consequences...


                  ( source )

                  Regards, Sven
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    And here is an interesting german article:

                    Die Panzersprenghunde der Roten Armee

                    Minenhunde als "Panzervernichtungshunde" waren lebende Minen !

                    Geeignet waren Schäferhunde, Riesenschnauzer, Boxer, Dobermannpinscher und Terrier. Über die wachsende Bedeutung der militärischen Verwendung von Hunden geben die Verlustzahlen des Ersten Weltkrieges Auskunft. Das deutsche Heer verlor in den Jahren von 1914 bis 1918 zwischen 20 000 und 30 000 Tiere, darunter 4 000 Sanitätshunde. Nach dem Krieg wurde in Sperenberg bei Zossen die Heereshundeschule eingerichtet. Kriegshunde kamen vor allem für Hilfsdienste zum Einsatz Über eine ganz anders geartete Verwendung ist die Verwendung von Hunden als lebende Minen.

                    Deutsche Soldaten begegneten ihnen erstmals im Herbst und Winter 1941 während des Krieges gegen die Sowjetunion.
                    Von der Roten Armee waren Panzerzerstörerabteilungen aufgestellt worden, deren einziges und wirksamstes Kampfmittel sogenannte "Panzervernichtungshunde" waren. Die dafür verwendete Tiere reichten hinsichtlich ihrer Größe nicht ganz an die deutscher Schäferhunde heran. Ihre Hundeführer schnallten ihnen unmittelbar vor dem Einsatz eine Sprengladung um, deren Gesamtgewicht zwischen 7,2 und 12 kg lag, und die in zwei Taschen untergebracht war.

                    Auf dem Rücken wurde die Zündvorrichtung befestigt, zu der ein etwa 200 mm langer, hölzerner Kipphebel, ein Schlagbolzen und eine 200 g schwere Übertragungsladung gehörten. Die Hunde waren von ihren Hundeführern während einer 40 Tage dauernden Ausbildung dazu abgerichtet worden, unter Fahrzeugen nach Futter zu suchen. Dazu wurden Traktoren benutzt. Im Ernstfall stieß dabei der Kipphebel an den Boden der Fahrzeugwanne oder an tiefer liegende Teile des Fahrgestells und wurde nach hinten gedrückt.
                    Der Sicherungssplint gab daraufhin den Schlagbolzen frei, der die Sprengkapsel und die Übertragungsladung auf dem Rücken des Tieres zündete. Durch Zündübertragung wurde dann die zweiteilige Sprengladung in den Seitentaschen zur Explosion gebracht. Ihre Sprengkraft reichte aus, um ein Panzerfahrzeug zu zerstören.

                    Spezielle sowjetische Verbände dressierten "Minenhunde". Ein solches Kampfmittel sorgte natürlich für Überraschung. Die 3. Panzerdivision des deutschen Heeres hatte im Oktober 1941südostwärts der Stadt Gluchow zum ersten Mal Gefechtsberührung mit russischen Panzervernichtungshunden. Sie erzielten keine Erfolge; die Tiere wurden von den aufmerksamen deutschen Soldaten abgeschossen, andere gerieten zusammen mit drei Hundeführern in Gefangenschaft. Ein Verhör der Hundeführer ergab, daß sie erst im Juli 1941 zu den Streitkräften einberufen worden waren. Nach Abschluß der Ausbildung in Wischnjaki, 15 km von Moskau entfernt, hat man sie zusammen mit den Hunden zur 2. Armee-Panzervernichtungsabteilung versetzt.

                    Die Abteilung Fremde Heere Ost (II) im Oberkommando des Heeres erhielt am 6. Dezember 1941 eine Meldung über den Einsatz von Panzervernichtungshunden im Abschnitt der 1. Panzerarmee. Wenige Tage später, am 13. Dezember, wurden weitere Einzelheiten bekannt. Erstmals lag die Gliederung einer Panzervernichtungsabteilung vor, die mit Panzervernichtungshunden ausgestattet war. Eine solche Abteilung besaß eine Sollstärke von 235 Offizieren, Unteroffizieren und Soldaten. Hinzu kamen 150 Panzervernichtungshunde, die im deutschen Sprachgebrauch als Minenhunde bezeichnet wurden. Zwei Abteilungen konnten zu einem Panzerzerstörerbataillon mit 500 Mann und 300 Hunden zusammengefaßt werden. Von der Abteilung Fremde Heere Ost (II) wurde eingeschätzt, daß der Russe "aus Mangel an Panzerabwehrwaffen rührig bei der Verwendung behelfsmäßiger Abwehrmittel" sei. Dazu zählten die Panzervernichtungshunde. Besondere Erfolge dieses "Kampfmittels" sind indessen nicht bekannt geworden. Da fällt der Bericht eines Angehörigen der 18. Panzerdivision aus dem Jahr 1942 schon aus dem Rahmen, in dem vom erfolgreichen Einsatz russischer Panzervernichtungshunde im Abschnitt dieses Verbandes die Rede ist. Auf deutscher Seite entstanden Verluste, die eine hektische Jagd auf alle Hunde nach sich zogen. Dabei ist auch leider mancher Hund, der in den Einheiten als Maskottchen besondere Hege und Pflege erhalten hatte, zur Strecke gebracht worden.Nach russischen Angaben waren noch im Juli 1943, während der Schlacht im Kursker Bogen, mehrere Panzerzerstörerbataillone mit Panzervernichtungshunden im Einsatz.Weitere Angaben über diese besondere Verwendungsform von Kriegshunden auf russischer Seite liegen nicht vor.

                    1944/45 befanden sich die deutschen Streitkräfte in einer ähnlichen Situation wie die Rote Armee zu Beginn des Krieges. Sie waren in die Defensive gedrängt und mußten sich vor allem der Überzahl der Panzer und gepanzerten Fahrzeuge ihrer Kriegsgegner erwehren. Auf der Suche nach geeigneten Kampfmitteln erinnerte man sich der Verwendung russischer Panzervernichtungshunde. Dabei gesammelte Erfahrungen waren die Grundlage für verschiedene Versuche, die das Heereswaffenamt in Zusammenarbeit mit der Heereshundeschule in Sperenberg auf dem Versuchsgelände in Kummersdorf durchführte. Ziel war es, mit Hilfe des Einsatzes von "Minenhunden" zusätzliche Panzervernichtungsmittel zu schaffen. Soweit bekannt geworden ist, blieb es bei den Versuchen.

                    Das Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges unterbrach die Arbeiten an diesem Projekt.
                    ( source )

                    free internet translation service:

                    Babelfish

                    Regards, Sven

                    Comment

                    Latest Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X