Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Soviet Cartoons like Bill Maudlin?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Soviet Cartoons like Bill Maudlin?

    Hi, I have a question about Soviet cartoons in WWII. I don't mean the posters nor the propaganda films interesting though they are...I mean a Red Army equivalent of this:

    http://ww2.pstripes.osd.mil/02/nov02/mauldin/

    Bill Maudlin the American who captured so well the life of the GI in Europe in WWII with a pretty rare gritty realism that shows the real heroes as they were, just regular "Joes" in tough situations. Are there any Soviet artists or comics like that?

  • #2
    I find it hard to believe Russian servicemen didn't like to laugh like the rest of humanity, but I've never encountered mention of anything famous myself.

    I'd like to see any content if it exists, myself.

    I don't think the politicals would kill off good comedy, but you never know with those types.
    Life is change. Built models for decades.
    Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
    I didn't for a long time either.

    Comment


    • #3
      Cartoons (in the sense of comics series) were (and are) not popular in Russia. Also, all printing capacities were controlled by the censorship that time, and therefore there were no chance for a black humor or depicting Soviet soldiers in a non-heroic view;-)

      However, IMHO, there was one poetic analogue of these cartoons in the Soviet Union. This was the famous poetry series "Vassily Terkin" written by Alexander Tvardovsky in 1941-1945 (and probably translated into English). The figure of Vassily Terkin depicts an ordinary soldier, which passes through the war with numerous heroical, comical, or sorrowful events.

      These are several illustrations to this poem:
      1) www.victory.mil.ru/lib/art/04/0031.jpg
      2) http://festival.1september.ru/articl...46/full.h1.jpg
      3) http://www.cultinfo.ru/fulltext/1/00.../202099551.jpg

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Vitaly View Post
        Cartoons (in the sense of comics series) were (and are) not popular in Russia. Also, all printing capacities were controlled by the censorship that time, and therefore there were no chance for a black humor or depicting Soviet soldiers in a non-heroic view;-)

        However, IMHO, there was one poetic analogue of these cartoons in the Soviet Union. This was the famous poetry series "Vassily Terkin" written by Alexander Tvardovsky in 1941-1945 (and probably translated into English). The figure of Vassily Terkin depicts an ordinary soldier, which passes through the war with numerous heroical, comical, or sorrowful events.

        These are several illustrations to this poem:
        1) www.victory.mil.ru/lib/art/04/0031.jpg
        2) http://festival.1september.ru/articl...46/full.h1.jpg
        3) http://www.cultinfo.ru/fulltext/1/00.../202099551.jpg
        There was nothing like "Krokodil" in the Red Army?
        Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

        Comment


        • #5
          No, there was no special comic magazine like "Krokodil" in RKKA:-) But, I suppose, the local military papers often printed single cartoons like this by Kukrynics: http://www.artonline.ru/encyclopedia...prev/310-1.jpg. Probably they appeared even in The Red Star - the official RKKA newspaper.

          Kukrynics is the name of the group of Soviet painters which mainly specialized in such cartoons. But this was an anti-Nazi propaganda, a political caricature. I believe they never painted caricatures of Soviet soldiers :-)

          Comment


          • #6
            The attitude to fighting a foreign war has changed the kinds of propaganda the soldiers themselves produce, I think. It was easier to explain the fight in a fighting position in France by making a joke or something, while in Russia they were fighting in their own country and more serious slogans made more sense. When we fought in our own country the songs and pictures were very serious, and now humor takes the place to deal with being in sorry places.

            On the other hand, the Germans did have some kind of humor, but it mostly slandered their foes:


            http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/korps.htm

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Vitaly View Post
              Cartoons (in the sense of comics series) were (and are) not popular in Russia. Also, all printing capacities were controlled by the censorship that time, and therefore there were no chance for a black humor or depicting Soviet soldiers in a non-heroic view;-)
              Well thanks for the links, although I disagree the US soldiers (Willie and Joe) are portrayed in a unheroic way...they are rather portrayed as humans. Some Soviet films I have seen portray the Red Army soldiers in a realistic way. It is correct to say humour is not a big part of it though, which makes sense as you say they were fighting in their own country.
              Last edited by joea; 10 Sep 07, 12:25.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally Posted by joea: Well thanks for the links, although I disagree the US soldiers (Willie and Joe) are portrayed in a unheroic way...
                Well, that is why I used smile in the end of my sentence. I quite agree that a soldier living in trenches for years is the hero. But if you have seen the Soviet movies of that time (GPW and further until, say, end of 1950s), you could observe that the soldier live was shown in a very decorate view: Soviet soldiers were shown well-dressed, full of food, and clean-shaven:-) After this they of course open German tanks with a knife one by one:-) But I thing that English and US movies were of the same sort that time...

                Comment


                • #9
                  During the war most US & British movies were like that. Clean & healthy looking soldiers. There were some exceptions of course, but rare. Post war this changed. One of the rougher US films was 'The Victors & the Vanquished', relelased in 1949 or 1950. It was sympathetic to the common soldier, but demonstrated how war could strip the humanity from a man.

                  A widely distributed documentary called 'The Battle For San Renemo' (spelling?) conveyed a tiny bit of the horror and psycholgical cost of combat. It first appeared in the theatres in 1945 or 1946.

                  Bill Maudlins irrevrence towards authority and icons was widely reflected in newspaper illustration of the era. His cartoons were from the editorial page rather than the comics page. I those days it was common for the editorial pages of the newspapers to include a cartoon as a sort of mini poster to make some social or political point, often with scathing black humor. Post war most of Mauldins appeared on the editorial pages.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Two my knowledge, Bill's work appeared primarily in Stars and Stripes.

                    That's the armies paper, not the New York Times for instance.

                    In a news paper for soldiers, you would expect the humour to be a reflection of the common soldier. And let's remember, every General was a buck private once, they want to laugh too eh, even if they are actually laughing at themselves in the process.

                    A lot of the humour was also not surprisingly, related to where Bill actually was at the time too.
                    Life is change. Built models for decades.
                    Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
                    I didn't for a long time either.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Aries View Post
                      Two my knowledge, Bill's work appeared primarily in Stars and Stripes.

                      That's the armies paper, not the New York Times for instance.

                      In a news paper for soldiers, you would expect the humour to be a reflection of the common soldier. And let's remember, every General was a buck private once, they want to laugh too eh, even if they are actually laughing at themselves in the process.

                      A lot of the humour was also not surprisingly, related to where Bill actually was at the time too.
                      Maudlins cartoons originally appeared in the 45th Divsion (National Guard) newpaper. Those were largely humor items, but some had a undercurrent of social/editorial comment. They initially revolved around training in the US 1939-1941. The Star & Stripes newpaper picked up his cartoons circa 1942 or 43. By 1944 he was more or less detached from duty in the 45th Div and allowed to travel about Europe as a one man morale mission. It was in this period that his cartoons took on a strong social commentary, like the cartoons of the era that appeared on newspaper editorial pages.

                      Post war Maudlin was easily able to sell his cartoons to the newspapers, and they tended to appear on the editorial pages rather than the comics page.

                      I recomend his autobiography 'The Brass Ring'. It contains a cartoon portrait of Gen Patton hiding behind his ego. Also there is 'Up Front' which has his cartoons and comments of the war in Europe

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What time period did Prokofiev's "Lt. Kije" suite portray? That seemed to be sort of wry military humor (it also formed the plot to a television episode of M*A*S*H*).
                        "There are only two professions in the world in which the amateur excels the professional. One, military strategy, and, two, prostitution."
                        -- Maj. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower

                        (Avatar: Commodore Edwin Ward Moore, Republic of Texas Navy)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Humor was very dangerous business in Stalin's USSR. The life of Mikhail Zoshchenko (possibly best Soviet humorist) is a good illustration for that. So "pure humor" didn't exist in print practically - it had to have "politically useful message" at that time. IMO soviet humor of WWII mostly spread orally and carefully.

                          Printed word was very important part of life in the USSR. Soviet Army had lots of various papers. Actually even small units often had there own "battle leafs". Lots of artists worked for them. Their main production was so called "Боевой Карандаш" (Fighting Pencil) drawings. But certainly most talented of those artist made some sketches "for themselves". It is very difficult to find them now. Usually there were not humorous cartoons - just scenes of life. AFAIK most of those drawings were made by famous soviet caricaturist Леонид Сойфертис (Leonid Soyfertis) who spent all wartime in combat forces. A.Deineka and N.N.Zhukov also did some good pictures.

                          "We are entering into the town" by Leonid Soyfertis. 1944



                          "Concert at the brigade" by Leonid Soyfertis. 1943
                          Last edited by Rambow; 02 Oct 07, 02:24.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jon Jordan View Post
                            What time period did Prokofiev's "Lt. Kije" suite portray? That seemed to be sort of wry military humor (it also formed the plot to a television episode of M*A*S*H*).
                            From XIX century. It was sort of old military tale. Yuri Tynianov wrote the novel with its plot in 1920-s then there was the movie for which Prokofiev composed his music.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've been unable to paste a Mauldin drawing here. Frustrating as the examples I choose ought to carry the humor across the language & cultural barriers.

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X