Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Constantine Pleshakov

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Having read Pleshakov's book a while back I was surprised he TRIED to use the argument that Stalin might have wanted to attack Hitler at some point or another. His book is interesting in and of itself but it presents NO new evidence of any such thinking on the part of Stalin. Pleshakov's ideas are not backed up by any facts which have not been presented before, and even worse he offers NO support for the idea that Stalin was getting ready to attack. To the person who started this thread I can only recommend that you read Pleshakov's book once more, from what I remember his citations aren't even that well made and has one scrambling to the end notes section to find what one can. I was quite disappointed by that.
    "This isn't Paris, you will not get through here with a Marching Parade!" Defenders of Stalingrad
    "Man is the only animal that deals in that atrocity of atrocities, War. He is the only one that gathers his brethren about him and goes forth in cold blood and calm pulse to exterminate his kind. He is the only animal that for sordid wages will march out... and help to slaughter strangers of his own species who have done him no harm and with whom he has no quarrel.... And in the intervals between campaigns he washes the blood off his hands and works for "the universal brotherhood of man" - with his mouth". Mark Twain
    "It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets.” Voltaire

    Comment


    • #47
      "Having read Pleshakov's book a while back I was surprised he TRIED to use the argument that Stalin might have wanted to attack Hitler at some point or another. His book is interesting in and of itself but it presents NO new evidence of any such thinking on the part of Stalin."

      I agree. Pleshakovs remarks about a projected eventual war between Germany & the USSR, later in 1942 or 1943 were rather offhand and inadaquate. He expected the reader to smart enough to see those for what they were and not to read anything into them. He'd have done a better job with a bit more explination added. But the point of his book revolved around the disaster of June 1941 and how the Soviet leaders were not at all prepared for a war with Germany.

      Pleshhakov seems to have been writing for knowledgable students of the GPW, who already understood many other aspects. Lacking a broad knowledge of the subject I had to read Stalins Folly carefully. Had I not already read a bit of Glantz & similar items I'd been in over my head with this book.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
        "Having read Pleshakov's book a while back I was surprised he TRIED to use the argument that Stalin might have wanted to attack Hitler at some point or another. His book is interesting in and of itself but it presents NO new evidence of any such thinking on the part of Stalin."

        I agree. Pleshakovs remarks about a projected eventual war between Germany & the USSR, later in 1942 or 1943 were rather offhand and inadaquate. He expected the reader to smart enough to see those for what they were and not to read anything into them. He'd have done a better job with a bit more explination added. But the point of his book revolved around the disaster of June 1941 and how the Soviet leaders were not at all prepared for a war with Germany.

        Pleshhakov seems to have been writing for knowledgable students of the GPW, who already understood many other aspects. Lacking a broad knowledge of the subject I had to read Stalins Folly carefully. Had I not already read a bit of Glantz & similar items I'd been in over my head with this book.
        In my opinion he shouldn't have had anything in his book about whether Stalin wanted to or would have attacked Hitler, period. His book is interesting although already someone on amazon has given it a bad review and to a degree for good reasons. It isn't a very memorable book for me but I have used it as a source in various papers, it is a good starting point for understanding the opening phase of barbarossa.
        "This isn't Paris, you will not get through here with a Marching Parade!" Defenders of Stalingrad
        "Man is the only animal that deals in that atrocity of atrocities, War. He is the only one that gathers his brethren about him and goes forth in cold blood and calm pulse to exterminate his kind. He is the only animal that for sordid wages will march out... and help to slaughter strangers of his own species who have done him no harm and with whom he has no quarrel.... And in the intervals between campaigns he washes the blood off his hands and works for "the universal brotherhood of man" - with his mouth". Mark Twain
        "It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets.” Voltaire

        Comment

        Latest Topics

        Collapse

        Working...
        X