Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Red Army maps during WW2

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Red Army maps during WW2

    I'm interested in the terminology and symbols used on Soviet maps during the war. Specifically, I am talking about the maps that Glantz uses in his "Kursk Defence" document, and most of the ones on this site: http://rkkaww2.armchairgeneral.com/battles.htm

    Is there a place where I can learn about the all the symbols, and where/how to use them?

  • #2
    I'm interested in the terminology and symbols used on Soviet maps during the war. Specifically, I am talking about the maps that Glantz uses in his "Kursk Defence" document, and most of the ones on this site:
    http://rkkaww2.armchairgeneral.com/battles.htm

    Is there a place where I can learn about the all the symbols, and where/how to use them?
    Map coding book (in Russian) is loaded on my site http://RKKAWW2.armchairgeneral.com/m...map/mapkey.htm
    I’m trying to build some index of Russian abbreviations. Hope to upload it soon. Not sure all abbreviations to be include, but I’m trying.

    Regards,
    Alex
    If you fire a rifle at the past, the future will fire a cannon at you.....

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by edma2
      I'm interested in the terminology and symbols used on Soviet maps during the war. Specifically, I am talking about the maps that Glantz uses in his "Kursk Defence" document, and most of the ones on this site: http://rkkaww2.armchairgeneral.com/battles.htm

      Is there a place where I can learn about the all the symbols, and where/how to use them?
      Are you talking about the tactical unit symbols versus the geographical symbols referenced by amvas?
      Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, I was more interested in troops positions, such as trenches, mines, AT strongpoints, etc...also maybe some manuever (attack etc...) symbols

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by edma2
          Yes, I was more interested in troops positions, such as trenches, mines, AT strongpoints, etc...also maybe some manuever (attack etc...) symbols
          The best and most complete reference is "Handbook of Soviet Armed Forces Military Symbols", DDB-2680-41-78, Dept of Defense Intelligence Document(read Defense Intelligence Agency), August 1978, Unclassified, 251 pages. I do not know if it is available through government printing or if commercial copies were made.

          Another source that has been available commercially is a reproduced "Handbook on U.S.S.R. Military Forces, War Department Technical Manual, TM 30-430, November 1945. See Chapter XII, 'Maps, Conventional Signs, and Symbols', 23 pages.

          Voyennyi entsiklopedicheskii slovar', Moscow: Voyennoye izdatl'stvo, 1986, has an insert card with markings for military actions (higher than tactical).

          David Glantz puts in many of his books, a list of the transliterated abbreviations such as, GCC = Guards Cavalry Corps, GTA = Guards Tank Army.

          I will follow after further checking.
          Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

          Comment


          • #6
            Additional sources for Red Army symbols

            The commercial volumes of "The Armies of the Warsaw Pact Nations" by Friedrich Wiener, Vienna: Carl Ueberreuter Publishers, First English edition 1976, subsequent English editions - 1977, 1981. They were pocket size handbooks with two excellent pages of tactical symbols for staffs & command posts, weapons and vehicles, formations and units, and special symbols and examples.

            Check "Military Intelligence" Magazine March 1987. I did an article titled, "Graphic INTSUM (Intelligence Summary)" in which I borrowed heavily from Soviet military symbology which, I believe, more adequately depicts activity, composition and disposition than NATO symbology.

            Hope these help; you may try an internet search with these leads if not for specific reference maybe under the terminology.

            Good luck
            Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you very much.

              I will go over these resources. (too bad they might be difficult to obtain)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by edma2
                Thank you very much.

                I will go over these resources. (too bad they might be difficult to obtain)
                Do try the internet--found Soviet Infantry Tactics in WWII by Charles Sharp which has a seven-page appendix Tactical Symbols for maps, plans, sketches.

                You might also check with the Military History Institute or the military libraries at Command and General Staff College (CGSC), Ft. Leavenworth or War College, Carlisle Barracks--they may have the handbooks for inter-library loan, copy parts, etc.
                Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

                Comment

                Latest Topics

                Collapse

                Working...
                X