Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OFF TOPIC: "Russia Today" TV channel for English-speaking foreigners

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OFF TOPIC: "Russia Today" TV channel for English-speaking foreigners

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article...922910,00.html

    New Russian TV channel "Russia Today" has began its work. It is English-language channel.

    I hope that now you will be able to see huge parade on the Red Square in original and not only a few seconds that Western mass media will show...

    I suppose it will contain also and some historical data from Russian point of view.

  • #2
    I hope we get it up here in the far north. I did stumble across this interesting little tid bit however in Moscow Today:

    "The other day, when I learned that Russia Today, the new English-language propaganda television channel, had ceased broadcasting. The channel blamed a hacker attack, but computer-security experts doubted the claim. Word from inside the channel was that its staggering 850 employees had simply failed to master the top-of-the-line technology with which the state had lavishly equipped the new channel. Its computer specialists had also apparently whiled away the months of prep time with little effect. That's when I remembered the gray safes in which that now-defunct newspaper once kept its computers, and the bored faces of people busy just sitting around. Russia Today is back on the air, but chalk up another amusing and nostalgic moment of time turning back.



    Masha Gessen is a contributing editor of Bolshoi Gorod."
    Boston Strong!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by JSMoss
      I hope we get it up here in the far north. I did stumble across this interesting little tid bit however in Moscow Today:

      "The other day, when I learned that Russia Today, the new English-language propaganda television channel, had ceased broadcasting. The channel blamed a hacker attack, but computer-security experts doubted the claim. Word from inside the channel was that its staggering 850 employees had simply failed to master the top-of-the-line technology with which the state had lavishly equipped the new channel. Its computer specialists had also apparently whiled away the months of prep time with little effect. That's when I remembered the gray safes in which that now-defunct newspaper once kept its computers, and the bored faces of people busy just sitting around. Russia Today is back on the air, but chalk up another amusing and nostalgic moment of time turning back.



      Masha Gessen is a contributing editor of Bolshoi Gorod."
      Russia Today gathered a lot of young Western journalist. Its chief is a young Russian girl-journalist. They are not experiened but they are young.

      Comment


      • #4
        Still good to get a different perspective from what you usually get over hear. Even if it is government biased, even that is useful if one understands that is what it is.
        Boston Strong!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JSMoss
          Still good to get a different perspective from what you usually get over hear. Even if it is government biased, even that is useful if one understands that is what it is.
          Who did say that it is government biased?

          To show Russian perspective doesn't mean to be biased from a government.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Andrey
            Who did say that it is government biased?

            To show Russian perspective doesn't mean to be biased from a government.
            Guess I did not include the paragraph I was referring to in the quote above. In her lead paragraph Masha Gessen referred to Russia Today as "a state run propaganda station". I wasn't saying it was, just saying even if it was it would be useful.
            Boston Strong!

            Comment


            • #7
              I want to explain the main idea how I understand it.

              The idea is to show a Russian perspective to Westerners.

              It doesn't mean state propaganda. It doesn't mean that a state official will speak what the channel must show.

              Russian perspective is Russian perspective. May be, it is strange for westerners but Russian journalists have their own opinion that contradicts from western own. Russian journalists often describe events completely other than Western ones do it.

              For example, Russian journalists showed Yugoslavia events of 1999 in completely opposite way than Western journalists did.

              It is not because they are ordered by Russian government but because they are Russians and had other perspective, information sources and common view of situation.

              So Russian government organized that chasnnel and gave for Russian journalists to speak their opinion directly to Western spectators.

              I suppose it is very strange that, for example, the main channels of Russian TV showed the excellent parade in Red Square in May, 9th of 2005 but Western mass media showed only very limited short description of it.

              Now the Western spectators can see and listen "voice of Russia" (it doesn't mean "voice of Kremlin") without a go-between.

              Also Russian government invited some young Western journalists to work in it.

              It means to let them to work without any influence of Western mass media and Westen public opinion. They had possibility to live in Russia for some time and to know it better than other Western journalist which arrive in Russia with a lot of stamps in their minds.

              Very many Russians disappointed how Western mass media show the events in Russia and in other countries. May be, the new young journalists of "Russia Today" are not too professional but the Russian government gives then chance to become professionals.

              So listen voice of Russia in "Russia Today".

              And about censorship. If you read the first link so you read the words of a British girl, who is a journalist of "Russia Today" now. She speaks thatr she doesn't see any censorship.
              Last edited by Andrey; 17 Dec 05, 13:12.

              Comment


              • #8
                I understand both what you are saying and the bias they are trying to repond to by giving a more Russian point of view. You must understand that the US have no tradition of any direct government involvement in the media and therefore Americans tend to look at any news a government was involved in, even if just by picking the reporters, as being propaganda. This isn't necessarily true, I enjoy watching the Candian run news and it many ways find it less biased than the independent US news. I feel the same about BBC World Service which I also watch. All I am trying to get across that Americans see any news a government is involved in as propaganda no matter how good it is.
                Boston Strong!

                Comment


                • #9
                  How can you see this channel? I would be very interested myself.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Soon they promises to open site.
                    http://www.rttv.ru/
                    If you fire a rifle at the past, the future will fire a cannon at you.....

                    Comment

                    Latest Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X