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Katyusha point blank fire

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  • #16
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    As I understand the sequence, the rocket units would begin in a hide position, then move 12-18 kilometers to a load position where they could load the M-13's in a few minutes. Once loaded and time for their mission, they moved 300-400 meters to the firing position. After firing, the unit would immediately depart the firing position to move either to a hide position or another load position depending on number of missions and timing.
    You forgot one thing - presense of one gun for fire for adjustment.
    It was used prior to the major volley of rocket launchers
    If you fire a rifle at the past, the future will fire a cannon at you.....

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    • #17
      Originally posted by amvas View Post
      You forgot one thing - presense of one gun for fire for adjustment.
      It was used prior to the major volley of rocket launchers
      The use of a single 122mm gun for registration proved unreliable in the first ten separate batteries that were created in 1941, and they were stripped from existing units and eliminated from future created gds mortar units.
      Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 03 Apr 17, 17:39.
      Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ShAA View Post
        I think there might be a semantical difference between the terms. "Direct fire" might be the fire at a visible target, as opposed to "indirect fire" which is the fire at certain coordinates on a map outside the visibility range. At the same time the term "point blank" seems denote firing missiles at a very short distance, like the tactics Katyusha crews employed in Berlin when they fired at the walls of buildings located 300-400 meters away from the vehicles.
        +100500
        "Pryamaya navodka" literally means to "aim directly" (the gun/cannon barrel) at the target. So target is visible, but the distance may not be very close. Just close enough to see target properly.
        "V upor" is referring more to the range, i.e. very-very close. Incidentally it implies direct aiming as mentioned above.
        Kind regards
        Igor

        * My grandfathers WW2 memoirs - Romania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Hungary, 1944-1945.
        * On the question of "2 mil. rapes" by RKKA
        * Verdicts of RKKA Military Tribunals for crimes against civilians in 1945

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