Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Historical pictures of St. Petersburg and Moscow on Google Maps

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Historical pictures of St. Petersburg and Moscow on Google Maps

    I originally posted this in the London Blitz thread, but few people cared even about the London bombings there as the conversation quickly went off track. Hopefully it will get more traction here.



    I've recently discovered a similar project attempted in St.Petersburg and Moscow, but on a much greater time scale, from mid-1850s up to the year 2000. Historical pictures of both cities are pinned on Google Maps, and even the directions from which of the photos were taken are shown by little arrows. Here's the website for St.Petersburg: http://oldsp.ru/

    Here are some of the most famous pictures with bomb/shell damage pointed on the map. Take note that even when you click an individual link for each building, you can still see where it is on the map and zoom it out to see where it is on the global city map.

    To see all pictures of the Siege period, move the slider under the map to 1941-1944.

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/3373

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/2342

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/6596

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/6619

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/17698

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/4466

    Pre-war and Czarist military parades are also interesting - simply adjust the time scale and click on one of the dots on the Palace Square.

    I hope someone might point out some pics of Moscow of particular significance. Here's the Moscow maps website: http://oldmos.ru/

    Take note the websites might take some time to upload. I suppose their owners are using some crappy web hosting provider.

  • Stryker 19K30
    replied
    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/9789

    Standing on the corner of 4th Line ad Sredniy Prospekt facing west towards Metro Station Vasileostrovskya in 1987:



    Same on Dec 15th 2012:
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Stryker 19K30
    replied
    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/17443



    Looking east down Sredniy Prospekt from House 25 in 1976 at Gymnasium (School) 24 in 1976.

    And on December 15th 2012 (traffic difference, WOW!):
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Stryker 19K30
    replied
    I love stuff like this, especially living in this city. I belong to this group 'Old Vasily Island' and it is photos from over 150 years of the Island I live on.

    The school in this picture is right across the street from my house:

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/12293


    (probably taken in 1910)

    Picture I took 5 minutes ago:
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • ShAA
    replied
    A few more pairs from the website:

    Kikin Hall, one of the first stone built private mansions in St. Petersburg

    in 1944 and 1970

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/10504

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/10521

    Nevsky, 68

    in 1941 and 1971

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/6601

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/8053

    House of Engelgardt - Nevsky, 30

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/6927

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/14086

    Leave a comment:


  • ShAA
    replied
    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
    The contents are fantastic, once they are loaded. Thanks.
    Here's a little addition - you can see pics of the same place (or nearby places) just above the Googlemap area to the right of the photo. By pushing the left arrow you will see earlier pics, right arrow - later pics. You will rarely see pics which match exactly as the program searches for all pics of all objects taken nearby, but sometimes, when it's a building of historical significance or a landmark, the chances of finding such matches are much higher.

    For example, here's the house of the architect Adamini:

    In 1941 - http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/17698

    In 1987 - http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/15620

    Leave a comment:


  • ShAA
    replied
    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
    Gotta love the American Cold War interpretation. The plan came with a lot of strings attached, the most unacceptable being the imposition of US control over several areas of Soviet financial regulation. From the Soviet point of view, this amounted to the loss of sovereignty. The Europeans, who completely abandoned their global ambitions, had little to choose, and willingly surrendered their independence in foreign policy matters and partly, their domestic policies, to the US.

    http://www.johndclare.net/cold_war8_Stalinreaction.htm

    In a recent interview Vladimir Yerofeyev, who served in the Soviet Foreign Ministry after the war, described Russia's reaction to the Marshall Plan:

    "Stalin, with his suspicious nature, didn't like it: 'This is a ploy by Truman. It is nothing like Lend-Lease - a different situation. They don't want to help us. What they want is to infiltrate European countries.'

    "But Molotov insisted on his view, and Stalin said, go. So Molotov went to the Paris conference. He listened to all the proposals. He understood that it was not simple; the aid had strings attached.
    http://blogs.cfr.org/lindsay/2012/06...ement-address/

    Marshall’s proposal was as simple as it was bold: the United States would help rebuild war-torn Europe if the Europeans agreed to develop a plan for reconstruction. Marshall’s offer extended to the Soviet Union and its allies. Was Marshall soft on communism? Far from it. He knew that Congress would kill any aid package for Europe if it meant aiding communist governments. But he also knew that Washington needed to avoid the impression that it was trying to divide Europe. He calculated, correctly as it turned out, that the Soviets would reject the aid offer because it required them to open their economy to Western inspection.
    But seriously, if you'd like to discuss it, we can open a new thread and move these posts there, either in the Russia or RKKA section. I'm sure the moderators won't mind doing it.

    Leave a comment:


  • joea
    replied
    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
    That's true, never made any judgement on that-just stating the fact.

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Takes a while to learn to operate
    but once you got the hang of it, it is fascinating

    What strikes me in so many pictures is what a wide laid-out city it is.

    Leave a comment:


  • Half Pint John
    replied
    Originally posted by ShAA View Post
    I originally posted this in the London Blitz thread, but few people cared even about the London bombings there as the conversation quickly went off track. Hopefully it will get more traction here.



    I've recently discovered a similar project attempted in St.Petersburg and Moscow, but on a much greater time scale, from mid-1850s up to the year 2000. Historical pictures of both cities are pinned on Google Maps, and even the directions from which of the photos were taken are shown by little arrows. Here's the website for St.Petersburg: http://oldsp.ru/

    Here are some of the most famous pictures with bomb/shell damage pointed on the map. Take note that even when you click an individual link for each building, you can still see where it is on the map and zoom it out to see where it is on the global city map.

    To see all pictures of the Siege period, move the slider under the map to 1941-1944.

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/3373

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/2342

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/6596

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/6619

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/17698

    http://oldsp.ru/photo/view/4466

    Pre-war and Czarist military parades are also interesting - simply adjust the time scale and click on one of the dots on the Palace Square.

    I hope someone might point out some pics of Moscow of particular significance. Here's the Moscow maps website: http://oldmos.ru/

    Take note the websites might take some time to upload. I suppose their owners are using some crappy web hosting provider.
    The contents are fantastic, once they are loaded. Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Half Pint John
    replied
    the Soviet Union did not get the massive amounts of aid that even the aggressor states got to rebuild.
    Who's fault was that?

    Marshall Plan assistance was offered to Russia and the Eastern European satellites. Stalin, suspicious of American intentions, rejected the offer and called it a trick. Hw speeded the establishment of Stalinist regimes throughout Eastern Europe. [Hitchcock] Not only did Stalin refused the offer of American assistance for the Soviet Union, but he refused to allow the Eastern European sattelites to participare as well.
    http://histclo.com/essay/war/cold/wc-mars.html

    Leave a comment:


  • joea
    replied
    Well you know the whole story of loss of architectural and cultural treasures during the war, in the USSR and elsewhere is a whole other story itself. I can only imagine the huge reconstruction effort that had to take place after the war, and the Soviet Union did not get the massive amounts of aid that even the aggressor states got to rebuild.

    Leave a comment:

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X