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Insane Italian propaganda pictures

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  • ShAA
    started a topic Insane Italian propaganda pictures

    Insane Italian propaganda pictures

    Mussolini must have brought lots of funny stuff from Ethiopia to his artists, otherwise there's no explanation to this.


    German and Finnish soldiers on skis attack a Soviet supply convoy across the ice of the Ladoga lake


    Capture of the Soviet General Staff (!!!) in Stalingrad

    and the crown jewel which totally takes the cake


    "Bolshevik defence system" - German soldiers liberate civilians placed in front of Soviet bunkers as a human shield

    See more of this here - http://tipolog.livejournal.com/24080.html

  • korman643
    replied
    By the way, Russian movies portraying the wartime period were quite popular here in Italy, particularly "When Cranes Return", "Ivan's Childhood" and "Ballad of a Soldier" (the last one made my mother cry, and she was definitely not crying often)

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  • korman643
    replied
    There are actually two good movies on the subject of Italian soldiers on the Russian front. One is the above mentioned "I Girasoli / The Sunflowers" with Mastroianni and Loren, the other is "Italiani Brava Gente / Attack and Retreat".

    Among the actors there's even a very young Peter Falk (Columbo). And of course it's a joint production

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  • ShAA
    replied
    Originally posted by Indpavan View Post
    A little off the subject a 1960s Italian movie was quite realistic about people - starred Marcello Mastrioni and Sophia Loren. She goes to the USSR to find her husband who is missing from WW2 on the Eastern Front. It was a good movie made by Italians, good acting, compelling story and movie did not indulge in standard cold war portrayals of the USSR's people.
    It was a joint USSR/Italian production, this explains it. Otherwise they would've exclusively filmed garbage dumps, poor old ladies and prison camps. How can you possibly sell a film about Russia to your audience if it won't be able to relish in its superiority over drunk subhumans oppressed by Communism?

    Here's the trailer

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  • Indpavan
    replied
    A little off the subject a 1960s Italian movie was quite realistic about people - starred Marcello Mastrioni and Sophia Loren. She goes to the USSR to find her husband who is missing from WW2 on the Eastern Front. It was a good movie made by Italians, good acting, compelling story and movie did not indulge in standard cold war portrayals of the USSR's people.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tuomas_
    replied
    Originally posted by vathra View Post
    Shooting from Panzerfaust looks cool
    Good catch! This idea has been expanded on by Hollywood: in the Rambo movie (1985), when the "Mi-24" is chasing Rambo around, you can see the rocket pod actually spouting machinegun fire from several tubes. (The heroic Rambo of course defeats this surprising threat by launching a RPG safely from inside his downed helicopter packed with people. One gets the idea the screenplay writers weren't established military experts.)

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  • vathra
    replied

    Shooting from Panzerfaust looks cool

    Leave a comment:


  • Domenic
    replied
    Ha! Ha! Ha!

    Originally posted by Michele View Post
    Wait a second - you are saying that Italian propaganda drawings aren't the only ones that sometimes went over the top!? I'm shocked. I thought Beltrame had exclusive rights on that.
    Good one!

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  • Michele
    replied
    Originally posted by Skoblin View Post
    Even better!

    Battling buses of World War II - next stop: Fuhrerville!
    Wait a second - you are saying that Italian propaganda drawings aren't the only ones that sometimes went over the top!? I'm shocked. I thought Beltrame had exclusive rights on that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Skoblin
    replied
    Even better!

    Battling buses of World War II - next stop: Fuhrerville!

    Leave a comment:


  • The Exorcist
    replied
    Hmmm... something bombastic and fantastical yet artistically rendered from Italy?

    Huh, how unusual.

    Leave a comment:


  • Karri
    replied
    There is at least one instance of soldiers using crowbars to disable the machineguns in tanks. Logs were used to jam the treads. Of course propaganda takes this idea a bit further.

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  • Michele
    replied
    Originally posted by ShAA View Post
    So with the greatest luck they could've only captured a divisional HQ. Although, if I'm not mistaken, by that time it was alrady rather uncommon that a colonel would command a division, but considering the carnage in Stalingrad it looks plausible.
    Or it's entirely made up, which also is a possibility, and details like the patches aren't terribly reliable anyway in a drawing.
    Note that it is possible the source of the tale is German propaganda, and Beltrame and his newspaper are only repeating it. With the translation into German, it would be a case of a propaganda story getting bigger with each retelling, which is not uncommon at all.

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  • ShAA
    replied
    Originally posted by Michele View Post
    I suppose this could be not as insane as it seems at first sight. The caption is a German translation. Certainly "Generalstab" is a unique body to each country, the body of officers from which the overall command of all the ground forces of that country is selected. But I suspect it may well be a bad translation from the Italian "quartier generale", which doesn't mean "general staff" but just "headquarters".

    And "Armee", naturally, also means the command level below "Heeresgruppe" and "Korps".

    Even so, it remains a propaganda tale. AFAIR, the Germans did not capture, in Stalingrad, Chuikov and his staff, or another HQ of that level. But it's less outlandish than the capture of the Stavka or similar unique body of top senior officers.
    If you look at the collar signs you'll see they're all rectangular, which means none of these people has the rank higher than a colonel. Starting from Major-General, collar patches looked like this:





    Here's the picture of Chuikov's HQ.



    So with the greatest luck they could've only captured a divisional HQ. Although, if I'm not mistaken, by that time it was alrady rather uncommon that a colonel would command a division, but considering the carnage in Stalingrad it looks plausible.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michele
    replied
    Originally posted by ShAA View Post
    Capture of the Soviet General Staff (!!!) in Stalingrad
    I suppose this could be not as insane as it seems at first sight. The caption is a German translation. Certainly "Generalstab" is a unique body to each country, the body of officers from which the overall command of all the ground forces of that country is selected. But I suspect it may well be a bad translation from the Italian "quartier generale", which doesn't mean "general staff" but just "headquarters".

    And "Armee", naturally, also means the command level below "Heeresgruppe" and above "Korps".

    Even so, it remains a propaganda tale. AFAIR, the Germans did not capture, in Stalingrad, Chuikov and his staff, or another HQ of that level. But it's less outlandish than the capture of the Stavka or similar unique body of top senior officers.
    Last edited by Michele; 06 Dec 12, 04:32.

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