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  • Dear Andrey,

    I happened to drop into this forum and was totally overwhelmed by your resoursefulness. Though I am completely new to this type of forum, your post made me feel comfortable to ask some help on one of my quest.

    Well, one of my fondest memories back to 60s and 70s was listening to Radio Moscow broadcasted to oversea. I liked the signal tune particulary. Now I know the tune/song was "shiroka strana moya rodnaya". I tried from time to time over years to find the music tune, but never successed. The Radio Moscow signal tune was a full orchestra version, but what I was able to find mostly were vocal. Could you be able to advise me how to approach to an orchestra version of "shiroka strana moya rodnaya". And some story about the song. For me at those time in my country, listening to the station was regarded as an espionage.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by SY Chun
      Dear Andrey,

      I happened to drop into this forum and was totally overwhelmed by your resoursefulness. Though I am completely new to this type of forum, your post made me feel comfortable to ask some help on one of my quest.

      Well, one of my fondest memories back to 60s and 70s was listening to Radio Moscow broadcasted to oversea. I liked the signal tune particulary. Now I know the tune/song was "shiroka strana moya rodnaya". I tried from time to time over years to find the music tune, but never successed. The Radio Moscow signal tune was a full orchestra version, but what I was able to find mostly were vocal. Could you be able to advise me how to approach to an orchestra version of "shiroka strana moya rodnaya". And some story about the song. For me at those time in my country, listening to the station was regarded as an espionage.
      Do you need orchestra version without words?

      This song (it is translated "My dear native land is wide") was very famous in USSR. As I remember it is the song from very popular pre-WWII Soviet comedy "Volga-Volga". It is the comedy about a company of ordinary people who took part in amateur theatricals. There was a competition in Moscow between such companies and they decided to go there by a very old paddle-boat alone the Volga. They rehearsed while they were moving by the paddle-boat. In the end they reached Moscow, saw its beauty and it was made under the sounds of the song.

      Here is the radio call of Moscow Radio. Enjoy.
      http://download.sovmusic.ru/m/radio.mp3

      Comment


      • Exactly!

        Immediately after this signal call of Moscow Radio, a grandeur orchestra version of "My dear native land is wide" used to follow it before starting a program. The radio transmit toward my country were serviced in Korean, various Chinese, Japanese and Russian languages every 30 minutes or so.

        I used to put small radio while studying on my desk every night tuned to Moscow Radio, and was a big fan. All those fond memories! I am looking for a orchestra version without words, just like the one I used to hear from Moscow Radio in late 60's and early 70's.

        One time in my life time, a couple of years ago I happened to come across with a young Russian in his 20s, and with a greatest hope I hummed the tune, but he didn't recognize the song! It was a desperate occasion.

        Thank you so much for the information about the song.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by SY Chun
          Exactly!

          Immediately after this signal call of Moscow Radio, a grandeur orchestra version of "My dear native land is wide" used to follow it before starting a program. The radio transmit toward my country were serviced in Korean, various Chinese, Japanese and Russian languages every 30 minutes or so.
          I'll try to search it in web.

          I used to put small radio while studying on my desk every night tuned to Moscow Radio, and was a big fan. All those fond memories! I am looking for a orchestra version without words, just like the one I used to hear from Moscow Radio in late 60's and early 70's.
          I never heard the Moscow Radio. What interesting did it speak to listen it in the spite of the risk to be judged as Communist Agent?

          One time in my life time, a couple of years ago I happened to come across with a young Russian in his 20s, and with a greatest hope I hummed the tune, but he didn't recognize the song! It was a desperate occasion.
          He was too young when USSR collapsed. The Soviet culture differs from the Russian culture of the 90th which is like Western mass-culture.

          To the point, now the best old Soviet songs are VERY popular. It is very often when the best modern singers sing those songs in TV.

          Comment


          • I said you wrong movie from which the song was, I mixed two different songs.

            Officially it is called “Song about the Motherland”

            It is from the movie “Circus”. In this movie an American circus came in USSR. An white actress of the circus has black child. And the circus’ chief speaks to hers: you must do what I say or I’ll say to everyone that you have a black child, it is disgrace to have a black child. And in the end she refused to do what he wanted and he declared before Soviet public in a performance: “Look at her, she has a black child!” But the Soviet public does not understand what is strange to have a black child. Somebody speaks that in USSR the people of any color of skin are equal. In the end the woman marches in a parade together with a few her Soviet friends.

            Look this:
            http://download.sovmusic.ru/m/shstran3.mp3

            Comment


            • Really? You never heard the Moscow Radio? Maybe right, because it was an oversea service and the transmission might have been oriented to certain country.

              In those days my country was also very much strictly controlled ideologically with zero tolerance for communism or even with the Red color. Mostly driven by curiosity something like a forbidden fruit or looking for a star in the dark sky, the boy used to explore the world through the small radio, crossing the imaginary borderlands. Among neighboring countries, the radio from CCCP best attracted my mind. I liked the radio call and its interval signals, and all those marches and songs. And I used to try to get a picture from pieces of words I could catch from the program. What a nonsense! But it was a big part of my middle and high school days.

              Thanks for the story about the Circus. I just downloaded the song you attached. I like it, but it's not the one I am looking for over 30 years. Anyway, Thanks Andrey for the song.

              Comment


              • http://download.sovmusic.ru/m/proshal2.mp3 - 2762 kBt

                "Farewell"

                It is a very good song. It is a romantic song with it has a revolutionary romance of a young generation which wants to improve the world and is ready to fight for it. The music is excellent. Anyone who will download it will not sorry about spent time.

                This song was popular in USSR right before WWII and in the initial period of the war.

                This song is played in the famous Soviet movie "Officers".

                "Farewell"

                He has got an order: "To move on West",
                She has got an order to go in an another direction... [1]
                The two Komsomol [2] members went
                To fight in the Civil War.

                The were going in the war and were parting with each other,
                Leaving [native] quiet land:
                "My dear [girl], wish me
                Something at parting..."

                And the dear [girl] answered:
                "I wish with all my heart
                If you are killed so let your death is immediate,
                If you are wounded so let your wound is light.

                But the largest of my wishes
                To you, my comrade,
                Is to return home
                With a quick victory"

                He shook the girl's hand,
                And looked in her face:
                "And also I ask you
                To write me a letter [from the place where you will be]"

                [Girl]: "But to which destination shall I write the letter?
                How shall I know your path?"
                Man answered quietly: "It doesn't matter,
                Write ... to somewhere!"

                1935

                Remarks of Andrey:
                [1] – During the Civil War the Reds fought in a few directions simultaneously, the battles were in all the directions around them.
                [2] – Komsomol – Youth Communist Organization. Komsomol members often went to fight as volunteers.


                Прощание

                Дан приказ: ему — на запад,
                Ей — в другую сторону...
                Уходили комсомольцы
                На гражданскую войну.

                Уходили, расставались,
                Покидая тихий край.
                «Ты мне что-нибудь, родная,
                На прощанье пожелай...»

                И родная отвечала:
                «Я желаю всей душой —
                Если смерти, то — мгновенной,
                Если раны, — небольшой.

                А всего сильней желаю
                Я тебе, товарищ мой,
                Чтоб со скорою победой
                Возвратился ты домой».

                Он пожал подруге руку,
                Глянул в девичье лицо:
                «А еще тебя прошу я, —
                Напиши мне письмецо».

                «Но куда же напишу я?
                Как я твой узнаю путь?»
                «Все равно, — сказал он тихо. —
                Напиши... куда-нибудь!»

                1935

                Comment


                • 2 Andrey
                  Maybe the song that SY Chun looking for was a "Подмосковные вечера" from "Mayak radio station"?

                  Comment


                  • Nice song Andrey!

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by joea
                      Nice song Andrey!

                      i AM GLAD YOU LIKED IT.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Hellcat
                        2 Andrey
                        Maybe the song that SY Chun looking for was a "Подмосковные вечера" from "Mayak radio station"?
                        he asks "Shiroka strana moia rodnaia"

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by SY Chun
                          Really? You never heard the Moscow Radio? Maybe right, because it was an oversea service and the transmission might have been oriented to certain country.

                          In those days my country was also very much strictly controlled ideologically with zero tolerance for communism or even with the Red color. Mostly driven by curiosity something like a forbidden fruit or looking for a star in the dark sky, the boy used to explore the world through the small radio, crossing the imaginary borderlands. Among neighboring countries, the radio from CCCP best attracted my mind. I liked the radio call and its interval signals, and all those marches and songs. And I used to try to get a picture from pieces of words I could catch from the program. What a nonsense! But it was a big part of my middle and high school days.

                          Thanks for the story about the Circus. I just downloaded the song you attached. I like it, but it's not the one I am looking for over 30 years. Anyway, Thanks Andrey for the song.
                          Here I have found another version of "Shiroka strana moia rodnaia"
                          http://download.sovmusic.ru/m/shstran5.mp3

                          Comment


                          • http://download.sovmusic.ru/m/bessmert.mp3 - 541 KBt, Mark Bernes, 1942

                            “Undying Leningrad”

                            This is a song from the famous Soviet movie “Two soldiers” (1942). The movie was done when Leningrad was blocked and no one knew what would be the end of the blockade. The movie is about two friends who defended Leningrad and who loved one girl. One of the friends was played by Mark Bernes.

                            The most famous song from the movie is “Dark Night” which is one of the best Soviet WWII songs.

                            This song is also good. In the movie the song was singed by a few Soviet soldiers (including the soldier who was played by Mark Bernes) who had been encircled in a pillbox by enemies. They singed the song while they were repelling an enemy attack. In the same time the second friend went to save them.


                            “Undying Leningrad”

                            (Translated by Andrey)

                            Let’s sing, my combat comrade,
                            About the glory of Leningrad.
                            The words about its valor
                            Resounds in the whole world.
                            Our fathers stood to defend it in past [1],
                            A cannonade roared,
                            And they forever held against enemy attacks
                            Undying Leningrad.

                            Live, sacred city,
                            Live, undying city,
                            Great city-soldier,
                            Our beloved Leningrad!

                            Some banners are waving on the Neva
                            With an autumn night’s wind.
                            It is a night which is bright
                            Like a serene day
                            Over the city [2].
                            There is only one city of Lenin
                            In the whole world
                            And if anyone encroaches on its honor
                            So it is meaningless to him to ask for mercy!

                            Live, sacred city,
                            Live, undying city,
                            Great city-soldier,
                            Our beloved Leningrad!

                            Remarks of Andrey:
                            [1] – It is about the events of the Civil War when the Whites tried to capture Leningrad but were repelled by the Reds.
                            [2] – It is about “white nights”. Leningrad (St. Petersburg) is famous by its “white nights”. Leningrad is so far to the North that its nights are very bright for some periods of a year. In such periods of a year the nights are so bright that it looks like it is one large evening or a


                            “Бессмертный Ленинград”

                            Споём, товарищ боевой,
                            О славе Ленинграда.
                            Слова о доблести его
                            На целый мир гремят.
                            Отцы вставали за него,
                            Гремела канонада,
                            И отстояли навсегда
                            Бессмертный Ленинград.

                            Живи, священный город,
                            Живи, бессмертный город,
                            Великий воин-город,
                            Любимый наш Ленинград!

                            Качает флаги на Неве
                            Осенней ночи ветер.
                            Ночь ясная, как
                            Светлый день,
                            Над городом плывёт.
                            Есть город Ленина один
                            На всём на белом свете,
                            Кто посягнул на честь его
                            Пощады не найдёт!

                            Живи, священный город,
                            Живи, бессмертный город,
                            Великий воин-город,
                            Любимый наш Ленинград!

                            Comment


                            • Name that tune please!

                              I am enjoying slowly working through this excellent resource but wonder if any one can speed my search to identify one particularly tune?
                              It is heavily used in the sound track of Western documentary films showing scenes of the latter stages of the war in Eastern Europe, like the meeting of US Army / RKKA on the Elbe, celebrations in Berlin after the surrender. It is a strirring, up tempo piece sung by a male voice choir. I know it is not Song of the Plains or Katyusha. Any ideas please?

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Dave T
                                I am enjoying slowly working through this excellent resource but wonder if any one can speed my search to identify one particularly tune?
                                It is heavily used in the sound track of Western documentary films showing scenes of the latter stages of the war in Eastern Europe, like the meeting of US Army / RKKA on the Elbe, celebrations in Berlin after the surrender. It is a strirring, up tempo piece sung by a male voice choir. I know it is not Song of the Plains or Katyusha. Any ideas please?
                                What concrete films do you mean?

                                Can you cut the sound from the film (or a part of the fim) and to upload it? There are special computer prograns to cut pieces of a fim.

                                Sometimes it is possible to listen only a few sounds to identify the song.
                                Last edited by Andrey; 22 Apr 06, 23:40.

                                Comment

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