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USS Nassau (LHA-4) Decommed

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  • #16
    Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
    Yeah, the plain metal is the most durable. Updating the fancy stuff is the usual issue for replacing a ship. The key to keeping a ship ... shipshape in mothballs is to prevent or reduce corrosion. Sacrificial anodes, like zinc, have to be maintained, water has to be kept out, and humidity controlled. The cocooning of interior equipment, like turogenerators and degaussing equipment, adds a layer to the protection.

    We've come a long way since the 1930s, but even back then most of our WWI destroyers came out of mothballs and into use without too much trauma. Knowing what didn't work back then was probably more important than knowing what did.
    interesting and good point on the WW1 DDs
    America has a lot of $ to be able to ''scrap'' these ships

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    • #17
      What bothers me is the Navy is choosing to decommision ships before their service life is used up. Also does anyone have a source as to these ships are going into storage or are they being scrapped? Another issue for me is if Trump wants a bigger Navy, why take out ships early? No one has promised these ships will be replaced by new builds.

      Pruitt
      Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

      Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

      by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
        What bothers me is the Navy is choosing to decommision ships before their service life is used up. Also does anyone have a source as to these ships are going into storage or are they being scrapped? Another issue for me is if Trump wants a bigger Navy, why take out ships early? No one has promised these ships will be replaced by new builds.

        Pruitt
        We'd need to look at specific cases to make that call. They can always play the "Triple D" game, "deactivated, decommissioned, disposed". Some wiggle room in there. Given the lag between the time a ship is first scheduled to leave active duty and the time it actually does we might have a 360-ship navy for a few moments.
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        • #19
          Are these ships still mission-viable? Could a smaller, cheaper ship carry out their roles?
          Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
            Are these ships still mission-viable? Could a smaller, cheaper ship carry out their roles?
            We try to have multi-mission capable ships.
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            • #21
              Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
              Are these ships still mission-viable? Could a smaller, cheaper ship carry out their roles?
              yes, the Nassau had the well deck plus choppers--not only could you land troops by chopper and sea, you could also resupply them more efficiently---especially vehicles

              ..I remember leaving the Nassau from the well deck..everyone was standing in the boat except me [ I always took it easy if I could/etc ] we were hurrying up and waiting!
              the helmsman-or whatever- hit the side of the well deck as he was backing out, [ IIRC ] and knocked many people over

              whereas the USS Inchon was smaller,and only had choppers
              Attached Files

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Moulin View Post
                yes, the Nassau had the well deck plus choppers--not only could you land troops by chopper and sea, you could also resupply them more efficiently---especially vehicles

                ..I remember leaving the Nassau from the well deck..everyone was standing in the boat except me [ I always took it easy if I could/etc ] we were hurrying up and waiting!
                the helmsman-or whatever- hit the side of the well deck as he was backing out, [ IIRC ] and knocked many people over

                whereas the USS Inchon was smaller,and only had choppers
                Looks like the America class, less the first ship, will have well decks. They plan for eleven, which should more than make up for the Tarawa class.

                The ship was 38 years old. Is that young to be decommissioned? From what I read it spent a lot of time at sea, including tying the most time at sea without a port call record.
                Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                  Looks like the America class, less the first ship, will have well decks. They plan for eleven, which should more than make up for the Tarawa class.

                  The ship was 38 years old. Is that young to be decommissioned? From what I read it spent a lot of time at sea, including tying the most time at sea without a port call record.
                  The active duty time for a ship depends on several factors.

                  1. Did they design it to be "renewed", upgraded easily?

                  2. Is/are the mission(s) it was intended for still relevant?

                  3. Have new designs/new weapons made it obsolete?

                  4. etc.

                  Doing SLEP* on a ship is expensive, but can effectively double the life of the ship. The Forrestals all went through this IIRC. It's not as expensive as building a ship from scratch, but it is costly and time consuming.


                  *SLEP: Ship Life Extension Program.
                  Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
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                  The best place in the world to "work".

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
                    The active duty time for a ship depends on several factors.

                    1. Did they design it to be "renewed", upgraded easily?

                    2. Is/are the mission(s) it was intended for still relevant?

                    3. Have new designs/new weapons made it obsolete?

                    4. etc.

                    Doing SLEP* on a ship is expensive, but can effectively double the life of the ship. The Forrestals all went through this IIRC. It's not as expensive as building a ship from scratch, but it is costly and time consuming.


                    *SLEP: Ship Life Extension Program.
                    So what are the answers in this case?

                    Is the new class a big improvement?
                    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                      So what are the answers in this case?

                      Is the new class a big improvement?
                      I haven't studied them but from the outside I see immediate improvement, such as a second deck-edge elevator. The Lytton-built ships were as much an experiment in prototyping as they were building warships. The automated main propulsion space system was an utter disaster as well as reducing the manning for the main spaces if they failed to control the 70,000 hp turbines and 750,000 Kwh turbo generators.

                      As I understand it Lytton built LHA-1, -3, and -5. Experience show that -1's automatic plant controls just didn't work. So she came in and had them removed. Next dock over -3 was having them installed. When they failed on -3 the ship came into have them removed. Next dock over -5 was having them installed. Guess what?
                      Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
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                      The best place in the world to "work".

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                      • #26
                        ..thanks all replies/posts...Opana can answer those questions better than I
                        ...I was in the FMF from 87-90 and on 4 ships--all of which have been decommissioned/sold/etc
                        ..like I said, the Nassau seemed 'brand new'' to me in 1990
                        looks like the Inchon launched 1969, Nassau 1978 both decommed after about 30 years, right?
                        I was on the LST 1180 USS Manitowoc launched 1969-decom 1993, then
                        The ship was then transferred to the Republic of China through the Security Assistance Program on 29 September 2000.
                        Disposed of through the Security Assistance Program (SAP), transferred, cash sale, ex-US fleet hull foreign military sale case number assigned (Taiwan), 29 September 2000
                        what does this mean?

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Manitowoc_(LST-1180)
                        ..a lot of old US LSTs were bought by other countries

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                        • #27
                          regarding posts # 19 and #21 sealift capability

                          While there was emphasis on lighter ground vehicles in the late 1990s, up-armored and heavier vehicles were used during operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Future counterinsurgency operations require ships that can carry and deliver those vehicles, including through use of shore connectors; cargo lift requirements are met more expensively by aircraft airlifting equipment
                          I take it they mean the heavier vehicles, and using sealift ...?

                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americ...s_assault_ship
                          Last edited by Moulin; 19 Apr 17, 12:11.

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                          • #28
                            From a former crewmember

                            Old? Chief - I think I've got a few years on ya....
                            Anyways, I was part of the decomm crew for USS INTREPID back in 1974.
                            It took us four months to get it to where it was far enough along to be towed from Quonset RI to the Philly navy yard. Mucho chipping, red leading, sealing of compartments, dehumidifying, dumping old/unneeded equipment(a lot just went right over the side)yadayadayada...
                            Years later I saw her as I passed by the Philadelphia yards driving on 95 on my way to FLA...rusty, mast on the flight deck, forlorn...forgotten.
                            Then along came Zack Fisher and now look at her! The INTREPID AIR/SPACE museum. located at 42nd St. along the Hudson.
                            Just goes to show that if it's done right, mothballing CAN extend the life of any given ship. INTREPID will be 75 next year.
                            www.intrepidmuseum.org
                            ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
                            IN MARE IN COELO

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Jose50 View Post
                              Old? Chief - I think I've got a few years on ya....
                              Anyways, I was part of the decomm crew for USS INTREPID back in 1974.
                              It took us four months to get it to where it was far enough along to be towed from Quonset RI to the Philly navy yard. Mucho chipping, red leading, sealing of compartments, dehumidifying, dumping old/unneeded equipment(a lot just went right over the side)yadayadayada...
                              Years later I saw her as I passed by the Philadelphia yards driving on 95 on my way to FLA...rusty, mast on the flight deck, forlorn...forgotten.
                              Then along came Zack Fisher and now look at her! The INTREPID AIR/SPACE museum. located at 42nd St. along the Hudson.
                              Just goes to show that if it's done right, mothballing CAN extend the life of any given ship. INTREPID will be 75 next year.
                              www.intrepidmuseum.org
                              did they do anything to the hull? update/fix/clean/strengthen/ etc?

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                                Looks like the America class, less the first ship, will have well decks.
                                The Tripoli also doesn't have a well deck, the focus of the first two ships in this class is purely air...... The current LPD & LSDs have what is deemed 'sufficient' well deck capability...

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