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  • The New York Times Appears to Be Preparing Another Huge UFO Revelation


    Paul Seaburn July 21, 2020
    ...
    If the rumors circulating amongst the UFO research community are real, the New York Times may have to add a second motto: “All the ‘UFO News’ That’s Fit to Print.” After being the leader in breaking the USS Nimitz Tic Tac UFO videos and stories and the existence of the Pentagon’s secret Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, a number of sites are dropping hints that The New York Times has another blockbuster revelation on the verge of being released to the public. What could it be? Get ready to be shocked/disappointed/overwhelmed/underwhelmed/other.
    “I don’t know if you saw it, but in the last few hours an indiscretion has begun to circulate in the UFO world: that the New York Times is preparing to document the existence of a government program to recover crashed UFOs.”

    UFO Hoje (UFO Today) dropped this news this morning, along with links indicating this rumor has been in play for some time. In early July, UFO Joe interviewed George Knapp about the aforementioned Wilson/Davis documents (about a 2002 meeting between astrophyscist, Eric Davis retired director of the Defense Intelligence Agency Admiral Thomas Wilson about the retrieval of crashed UFOs and re-engineering the technology) and the possibility of The New York Times releasing more information.
    ...
    https://mysteriousuniverse.org/2020/...fo-revelation/
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
    Present Current Events are the Future's History

    Comment


    • Partly to archive the embedded links;

      Quantum Physicist Recalls His Strange Encounter With Extraterrestrials


      Jocelyne LeBlanc December 10, 2019
      ...
      Quantum physicist Deep Prasad previously hinted that he had an encounter with extraterrestrials which is why he became so interested in UFOs and aliens. And just recently he came forward with his story. On Thanksgiving, Prasad posted his experience to Twitter and it is one interesting story to say the least.

      It’s a pretty lengthy story (the full transcript can be read here as well as on Prasad’s Twitter account), so I’ll just summarize the most important and highly interesting parts.
      ...
      https://mysteriousuniverse.org/2019/...aterrestrials/
      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
      “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
      Present Current Events are the Future's History

      Comment


      • Jul 22, 2020

        Huge, Hovering and Silent: The Mystery of 'Black Triangle' UFOs

        Some speculate they are super-secret US spy craft. Others question whether they might be from elsewhere, conducting some kind of surveillance.
        ........
        Within the larger mystery of the UFO phenomenon is another, still-unsolved puzzle: Why do so many reports involve strange, triangular-shaped craft—often described as dark in color, virtually noiseless and the size of a football field or larger? What, exactly, are they? And why are so many witnessed hovering or moving slowly and methodically, with no visible contrails?

        In the years after the U.S. Air Force coined the term “unidentified flying object” in 1952, reports often referred to UFOs generically as flying saucers. But witnesses then, and since, have described a wide array of shapes: saucers (or two saucers put together), eggs, hats, cigars, boomerangs, lightbulbs—even Tic Tac candies.

        Among the most commonly reported shapes were V-shaped, arrowhead-like or triangular. David Marler, UFO researcher and author of Triangular UFOs: An Estimate of the Situation, says he has reviewed more than 17,000 case files involving unidentified triangular craft, sometimes called “black triangles.” Whether the sightings represent advanced U.S. spy craft—as some speculate—or something of unknown origin, their purpose remains mysterious. Given their consistent hovering behavior, Marler says, they might be engaged in “surveillance of some nature—or scanning. Or analyzing the topography.”
        ....
        https://www.history.com/news/black-triangle-ufos-facts
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
        “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
        Present Current Events are the Future's History

        Comment



        • Do We Believe in U.F.O.s? That’s the Wrong Question
          Reporting on the Pentagon program that’s investigating unidentified flying objects is not about belief. It’s about a vigilant search for facts.
          ....
          • July 28, 2020, 5:00 a.m. ET
          Times Insider explains who we are and what we do, and delivers behind-the-scenes insights into how our journalism comes together.
          We were part of The New York Times’s team (with the Washington correspondent Helene Cooper) that broke the story of the Pentagon’s long-secret unit investigating unidentified flying objects, the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, in December 2017.

          Since then, we have reported on Navy pilots’ close encounters with U.F.O.s, and last week, on the current revamped program, the Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon Task Force and its official briefings — ongoing for more than a decade — forintelligence officials, aerospace executives and Congressional staff on reported U.F.O. crashes and retrieved materials.

          We’re often asked by well-meaning associates and readers, “Do you believe in U.F.O.s?” The question sets us aback as being inappropriately personal. Times reporters are particularly averse to revealing opinions that could imply possible reporting bias.

          But in this case we have no problem responding, “No, we don’t believe in U.F.O.s.”

          As we see it, their existence, or nonexistence, is not a matter of belief.

          We admire what the great anthropologist Margaret Mead said when asked long ago whether she believed in U.F.O.s. She called it “a silly question,” writing in Redbook in 1974:
          “Belief has to do with matters of faith; it has nothing to do with the kind of knowledge that is based on scientific inquiry. … Do people believe in the sun or the moon, or the changing seasons, or the chairs they’re sitting on? When we want to understand something strange, something previously unknown to anyone, we have to begin with an entirely different set of questions. What is it? How does it work?”

          That’s what the Pentagon U.F.O. program has been focusing on, making it eminently newsworthy. And to be clear: U.F.O.s don’t mean aliens. Unidentified means we don’t know what they are, only that they demonstrate capabilities that do not appear to be possible through currently available technology.
          ........
          https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/28/i...reporting.html
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
          “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
          Present Current Events are the Future's History

          Comment



          • Pentagon Has ‘Off-World Vehicles Not Made on This Earth’

            Bombshell: The government’s once-clandestine UFO program will reveal findings on unexplained materials and crashes.

            By Andrew Daniels

            Jul 26, 2020
            ......

            Update 7/26: We've updated this story to include official comments provided by the Pentagon to Popular Mechanics, as well as a clarification of Senator Harry Reid's original comments in the New York Times report.


            For years, the U.S. government has repeatedly changed its tune regarding its official involvement with UFO research.

            As recently as February, a Pentagon spokesperson told Popular Mechanics that, while a government program did investigate unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and other unexplained aerial phenomena for some time last decade, funding dried up in 2012. But when Popular Mechanics thoroughly investigated the covert program, multiple sources said it’s still ongoing to this day.
            ......
            In a June Senate Committee Report, the Senate authorized appropriations for fiscal year 2021 for the task force, supporting its efforts to reveal any links that unidentified aerial phenomena “have to adversarial foreign governments, and the threat they pose to U.S. military assets and installations.”

            From the report:
            The Committee remains concerned that there is no unified, comprehensive process within the Federal Government for collecting and analyzing intelligence on unidentified aerial phenomena, despite the potential threat. The Committee understands that the relevant intelligence may be sensitive; nevertheless, the Committee finds that the information sharing and coordination across the Intelligence Community has been inconsistent, and this issue has lacked attention from senior leaders.
            Therefore, the Committee directs the DNI, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense and the heads of such other agencies as the Director and Secretary jointly consider relevant, to submit a report within 180 days of the date of enactment of the Act, to the congressional intelligence and armed services committees on unidentified aerial phenomena (also known as ‘‘anomalous aerial vehicles’’), including observed airborne objects that have not been identified.

            Senator Marco Rubio, who chairs the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, told a CBS affiliate in Florida that he’s most interested to learn from the task force who’s responsible for unidentified aircraft spotted over American military bases. Rubio said he hopes “the Chinese or Russians or some other adversary” hasn’t made “some sort of technological leap” that “allows them to conduct this sort of activity.”
            .....
            Harry Reid, the former Nevada senator who was instrumental in funding the original UFO program, told the Times he believes that “crashes of objects of unknown origin may have occurred and that retrieved materials should be studied.” From the article:
            “After looking into this, I came to the conclusion that there were reports— some were substantive, some not so substantive—that there were actual materials that the government and the private sector had in their possession.”

            (An earlier version of the Times article said Reid believed “crashes from other worlds” had indeed occurred, and that retrieved materials had been “studied secretly for decades, often by aerospace companies under government contracts.” The Times has corrected Reid's account, and Reid has since clarified his statements in a tweet, below. Popular Mechanics has updated this section of the article accordingly.)

            The astrophysicist Eric Davis, who consulted with the Pentagon’s original UFO program and now works for the defense contractor Aerospace Corporation, told the Times that after he examined certain materials, he came to the conclusion that “we couldn’t make [them] ourselves.” In fact, Davis briefed a Department of Defense (DOD) agency as recently as March about retrieving materials from “off-world vehicles not made on this earth.”
            ..........
            https://www.popularmechanics.com/mil...ials-vehicles/

            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
            “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
            Present Current Events are the Future's History

            Comment


            • TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
              “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
              Present Current Events are the Future's History

              Comment


              • UFOs & the 'Tic Tac' Incident



                Date Sunday - August 16 2020Host George Knapp
                Guests Jeremy Corbell

                George Knapp was joined for the full program by documentary filmmaker Jeremy Corbell to discuss the history of the famous UFO videos released by the US Navy. Corbell stated that "This is an unprecedented time," and "people are accepting the idea that there appears to be real substance to this UFO mystery." Both George and the guest expressed disappointment with the reaction of some segments of the UFO research community and the seeming legions of naysayers and those engaged in so-called "Twitter wars" but, Corbell said, that even those people "have contributed to the conversation."

                The three clips that have been released to the public in the last two years are known as the "Go Fast," "Gimbal," and "Tic-Tac" videos. Corbell took the debunkers of the clips to task for "moving the goalposts" in discussions about their authenticity, meaning if they cannot answer one aspect of the video evidence, they will often change the scope and focus of their argument to another tack. Of the "Go Fast" incident, he said that both the temperature of the tracked object as well as its movement (averaging 240 miles per hour) is not possible for birds, which is one of the arguments of skeptics. Corbell played audio of his interview with Lieutenant Chad Underwood, the Navy pilot who actually filmed the "Tic-Tac" video, who said that the movements it displayed "would rip the wings right off" of any conventional aircraft, and added that it was "something I just can’t describe from a physics-based perspective."

                Halfway through the program, reporter Matthew Phelan called in to describe his in-depth research into the videos. Phelan has been investigating the technical aspects of the case, interviewing pilots like Underwood as well as representatives from the company that made the infrared cameras that were used to record them. He said that he was "thrilled that the New York Times gave the imprimatur of respectability" to the subject so that he (and other journalists) could request editors to cover it. He explained many of the intricate technical details of the camera system and how skeptics have tried to explain the seemingly quick movements of the objects as features or limitations of the technology. He lamented that many of them tend to deal in "pure speculation," rather than addressing the practical features of the case.

                Corbell also discussed his documentary and involvement with the Skinwalker Ranch mystery. George pointed out that it was almost exactly 14 years ago that millionaire Robert Bigelow visited the property in order to purchase it as a research location because of the strange incidents that had been reported there for many years. Corbell said that he has been able to speak to a local law enforcement officer who responded to incidents there before Bigelow became involved, which he said shows a pattern of strangeness long before the modern era. Corbell concluded that whatever is present on the Ranch is something that "is an intelligence that is aware of our interest." He also mentioned a raid by federal agents that was conducted against Robert Lazar (of Area 51 fame) that was apparently the result of the authorities eavesdropping on a supposedly private conversation they had. Corbell said it was "the first time I ever felt invaded in my personal privacy like that."
                Knapp's News 8/16/20

                George Knapp shared a number of recent news items of interest, including information on the biological effects of UFO encounters, and an interview with a former Area 51 employee.Website(s):
                Videos:
                https://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2020-08-16-show/
                TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                Present Current Events are the Future's History

                Comment


                • Here's a fascinating article. It looks into the early history of "flying saucers"~UFOs~UAPs~etc. and the mostly sociological impact in the form of the many scams and shenanigans generated by some. What's it's possible some of these personalities actually believed what they presented, the authors here make a case that many saw an opportunity for a hustle/con/scam to play.

                  Aside from crimes and borderline criminal actions of these persons, a possible greater harm was the tainting of a subject which did have some valid aspects worthy of real and objective investigation. Still does IMO, and that of others.

                  EXCERPTS/QUOTES:


                  The Saucers That Time Forgot

                  The Strange History of UFOs © Curt Collins and Claude Falkstrom
                  .....
                  Thursday, August 13, 2020

                  Fame, Fortune and Flying Saucers

                  Flying saucers and aliens... Some people feared these strange visitors from other planets, while others embraced them as saviors. Xenophobia is defined by Merriam-Webster as “fear and hatred of strangers or foreigners or of anything that is strange or foreign.” Fewer people are familiar with the term for its opposite, xenolatria. Xenolatry is veneration, love, or worship of the foreign.

                  Armando Simón’s 1979 essay, “The Zeitgeist of the UFO Phenomenon.” Simón’s essay focuses on the portrayal of aliens in science fiction movies:
                  “Some films have presented the antithesis of the invasion theme. Innocent and peaceful aliens in this case were attacked by an unreasoning, bigoted, and warring human race... The aliens, therefore, served as a convenient point of view for the screenwriter's xenolatric flagellations of humanity.”

                  That’s from UFO Phenomena and the Behavioral Scientist, edited by Richard Haines, and
                  Simón defined xenolatric in a footnote: "This term, recently coined by Isaac Asimov (1976), means hatred for one's own culture combined with idolization of other cultures while remaining blind to any shortcomings in the latter.” Xenolatry is an important underlying premise behind the strain of UFO belief embraced by the Contactees. To them, mankind is a primitive warlike people - we are unworthy, and need to be saved by the wisdom from our benevolent big brothers from outer space. In the age of atomic fear, a lot of people were desperate for salvation from above, whatever the source. As with virtually anything, opportunists pounced to exploit these beliefs.

                  It seems incredible to us today that in the 1950s people could have been so gullible to fall for swindlers' claims about flying saucers, such as meeting the people who flew them, or having the secrets of their technology. What we have to appreciate is that at the time some kind of unidentified flying objects were actually being seen by many people, and many more were hearing about them secondhand from supposedly trustworthy sources - coverage in the papers, radio and television news shows. UFOs were frequently a serious topic of discussion, in part because of the news generated by the investigation of flying saucers by the US Air Force.

                  Due to the constant media publicity, many people accepted to some degree that flying saucers were real. The main questions were about: what are they, why are they here, and where did they come from? The first saucer generation had seen the impossible happen, the invention and detonation of the atomic bomb, the launches of rockets, and then satellites like Sputnik. However, most people’s understanding was limited to what they’d picked up from newspaper headlines and entertainment, and it seemed that all that “Buck Rogers stuff” was coming true. It was the dawn of the space age, and anything seemed possible.
                  .....

                  Exploiting the Possibilities

                  Mankind’s speculation about life on other worlds did not begin in the 1940s with the flying saucer era. It preceded science fiction too and is probably as old as the development of language. With the flying saucers, it provided charlatans a golden opportunity to capitalize on the public’s interest, and they exploited it to package everything, from fringe religious teachings to confidence schemes.

                  Among those interested in the reports of flying saucers were the spiritualists and students of the occult. The spiritualists already claimed mental contact with other worlds and used saucers to make people believe that any wonders in the sky - past or present - were evidence of something from beyond our meager planet. In 1888, Helena Blavatsky used the idea of civilizations on other planets in The Secret Doctrine, but in a mystical or religious way, saying that they held knowledge and wisdom far superior to our primitive understanding. She co-founded the Theosophical Society, and Theosophy was a huge influence on fantasy and science fiction literature. The occult was also part of the foundation for folks like Meade Layne’s Borderland Sciences Research Associates (BSRA) beliefs about aliens visiting in spaceships - long before saucers.

                  BSRA director Riley Crabb wrote in a 1961 article that mysticism "is distasteful to many people who have been brought face to face with metaphysics by their interest in the Saucer phenomenon. This means that old material, the Ancient Wisdom, is going to have to be rewritten for them, dressed up in modern, Space Age, terminology, before they'll study it..."

                  (“The Sky People,” Round Robin, vol. 17, no 1, Jan-Feb 1961, p 22). What Crabb described was well underway, and as we shall see, just what George Adamski had perfected back in the late 1940s.

                  “The Disgraceful Flying Saucer Hoax” article by Bob Considine in Cosmopolitan magazine, Jan. 1951, noted that the US Air Force wasted a lot of time and money investigating phonies, but that flying saucer fakery was not actually a punishable offense:

                  “And nothing can be done about such frauds. A man who pilfers a three-cent stamp from the Post Office Department can be fined and sent to a Federal prison... Yet the most callous and cynical saucer­hoaxers will continue to go scot free, with a cackle of delight, until a penal act is created to check such offenses.”

                  Except when there was some other associated fraud, hoaxing a saucer story was not a crime. That legal loophole gave opportunists a virtual license to steal.

                  Contactees and Capitalists

                  The history of the Contactee era is complex and involves many interesting personalities, each with their own storylines. ...
                  .....
                  https://thesaucersthattimeforgot.blo...g-saucers.html






                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                  “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                  Present Current Events are the Future's History

                  Comment


                  • Another from "Coast to Coast" ...
                    ....
                    The Government and UFOs / Open Lines

                    During the first part of the show, Retired Army Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Randle discussed official investigations into UFO activity conducted by the United States Air Force (USAF) under Project Blue Book. He covered Blue Book's case history, as well as how internal politics and the Condon Report (which concluded the study of UFOs was unlikely to lead to useful scientific knowledge) brought an end to the USAF's public role in UFO investigations. During its active years, Blue Book collected over 12,000 cases of which a small percentage were considered unexplained or unidentified, Randle explained, noting several thousand cases were labeled "insufficient data for scientific analysis." He shared some of the best cases from Blue Book and how new information was brought to bear on these cases.

                    Randle recounted the Lonnie Zamora incident from 1964 in which a Socorro, New Mexico police officer claimed to have had a close encounter. It is no longer a single witness case, Randle revealed. "People had called the police station about something in the sky so it kind of corroborates Lonnie Zamora's tale about seeing the landed UFO, the two creatures, before it took off in the distance," he said. Randle also commented on the 1957 Levelland, Texas UFO case, pointing out the sheriff's daughter later reported her father had been asked by the USAF not to talk about the craft he saw that night. According to Randle, it is unlikely the government will ever disclose what they really know about UFOs. "I don't think disclosure is going to happen until the aliens land," he said.

                    ------------------------------------------------

                    The next 90 minutes of the program were devoted to Open Lines. Paul from Dayton, Ohio reported on UFO sightings over Wright-Patterson AFB in 1968. "We actually went out and measured a luminous blob floating over the runway," he recalled, noting Blue Book head Major Quintanilla suggested they were merely looking at Venus. "Many of those sightings, I think, just got buried," he said. ...
                    ....
                    kevinrandle.blogspot.com

                    https://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2020-08-14-show/
                    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                    Present Current Events are the Future's History

                    Comment


                    • Under "paranormal" ...
                      Daryl Bem Proved ESP Is Real

                      Which means science is broken.

                      ....
                      It seemed obvious, at first, that Jade Wu was getting punked. In the fall of 2009, the Cornell University undergraduate had come across a posting for a job in the lab of one of the world’s best-known social psychologists. A short while later, she found herself in a conference room, seated alongside several other undergraduate women. “Have you guys heard of extrasensory perception?” Daryl Bem asked the students. They shook their heads.

                      While most labs in the psych department were harshly lit with fluorescent ceiling bulbs, Bem’s was set up for tranquility. A large tasseled tapestry stretched across one wall, and a cubicle partition was draped with soft, black fabric. It felt like the kind of place where one might stage a séance.

                      “Well, extrasensory perception, also called ESP, is when you can perceive things that are not immediately available in space or time,” Bem said. “So, for example, when you can perceive something on the other side of the world, or in a different room, or something that hasn’t happened yet.”

                      It occurred to Wu that the flyer might have been a trick. What if she and the other women were themselves the subjects of Bem’s experiment? What if he were testing whether they’d go along with total nonsense?

                      “I know this sounds kind of out there,” Wu remembers Bem saying, “but there is evidence for ESP, and I really believe it. But I don’t need you to believe it. In fact, it’s better if you don’t. It’s better if I can say, ‘Even my staff don’t believe in this.’ ”

                      As Bem went on, Wu began to feel more at ease. He seemed genuine and kind, and he wasn’t trying to convert her to his way of thinking. OK, so maybe there’s going to be a you-got-punked moment at the end of this, she thought, but at least this guy will pay me.

                      In truth, Bem had no formal funding for his semisecret research program. For nearly a decade, he’d been paying undergraduates like Wu out of his own pocket, to help him demonstrate that we all possess some degree of precognition—a subtle sense of what will happen in the future. He rarely came into the lab himself, so he’d leave his lab assistants an envelope stuffed with bills. They dispensed $5 from the kitty to each subject they ran through the experiment.

                      For the rest of that semester and into the one that followed, Wu and the other women tested hundreds of their fellow undergrads. Most of the subjects did as they were told, got their money, and departed happily. A few students—all of them white guys, Wu remembers—would hang around to ask about the research and to probe for flaws in its design. Wu still didn’t believe in ESP, but she found herself defending the experiments to these mansplaining guinea pigs. The methodology was sound, she told them—as sound as that of any other psychology experiment.

                      In the spring of 2010, not long after Wu signed on, Bem decided he’d done enough to prove his claim. In May, he wrote up the results of his 10-year study and sent them off to one of his field’s most discerning peer-reviewed publications, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. (JPSP turns away some 85 percent of all submissions, making its acceptance rate comparable to that of the Cornell admissions office.) This was the same journal where Bem had published one of the first papers of his career, way back in 1965. Now he would return to JPSP with the most amazing research he’d ever done—that anyone had ever done, perhaps. It would be the capstone to what had already been a historic 50-year career.

                      Having served for a time as an associate editor of JPSP, Bem knew his methods would be up to snuff. With about 100 subjects in each experiment, his sample sizes were large. He’d used only the most conventional statistical analyses. He’d double- and triple-checked to make sure there were no glitches in the randomization of his stimuli.

                      Even with all that extra care, Bem would not have dared to send in such a controversial finding had he not been able to replicate the results in his lab, and replicate them again, and then replicate them five more times. His finished paper lists nine separate ministudies of ESP. Eight of those returned the same effect.

                      Bem’s 10-year investigation, his nine experiments, his thousand subjects—all of it would have to be taken seriously. He’d shown, with more rigor than anyone ever had before, that it might be possible to see into the future. Bem knew his research would not convince the die-hard skeptics. But he also knew it couldn’t be ignored.
                      ....
                      https://getpocket.com/explore/item/d...=pocket-newtab
                      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                      “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                      Present Current Events are the Future's History

                      Comment


                      • Here are all(correction; some of) the celebrities who claim they’ve seen real UFOs
                        https://filmdaily.co/news/real-ufos-...ity-sightings/

                        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                        “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                        Present Current Events are the Future's History

                        Comment


                        • If: "The Truth is Out There" & includes a "Them" from other worlds ;



                          There's a good chance that "politics" will enter the equation of Disclosure and Contact;
                          ExoPolitics
                          https://exopolitics.org/
                          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                          “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                          Present Current Events are the Future's History

                          Comment


                          • Re the "paranormal" aspect here;

                            The Mistake of Dismissing Margaret Murray and the Origins of Wicca
                            ...
                            When women write history, it comes under extra scrutiny from the establishment. When women make history, the establishment gets even angrier. Sometimes those women are just ignored, some of them are dismissed, and sometimes, the world calls them crazy, dangerous, or worst of all, witches. Margaret Murray, with her famous and controversial book The Witch-Cult in Western Europe, was all of those things.

                            You may never have heard of Margaret Murray, but you’ve probably known someone or seen some bit of pop culture that was peripherally influenced by her. That’s because her 1921 book was an important step for feminist views of history and the rise of paganism, witchcraft, and Wicca in the west. Murray’s theory, that witchcraft was a religion that had secretly continued in Europe from pagan times, directly influenced the founding of Wicca.
                            ....
                            https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddri...z&ocid=msnbcrd
                            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                            “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                            Present Current Events are the Future's History

                            Comment


                            • UFO Secrecy & Disclosure





                              Date Saturday - September 12 2020Host Jimmy Church
                              Guests John Greenewald, Jacques F. Vallee

                              Legendary UFO expert Jacques Vallee joined guest host Jimmy Church in the middle two hours of the program to delve UFO mysteries and disclosure. During the first hour, John Greenewald of The Black Vault commented on breaking news about the Pentagon possibly destroying UFO documents related to his FOIA requests.

                              The final hour of the show was devoted to Open Lines.
                              Website(s):
                              Book(s):
                              https://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2020-09-12-show/
                              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                              “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                              Present Current Events are the Future's History

                              Comment


                              • [QUOTE=G David Bock;n5214853]Under "paranormal" ...
                                Daryl Bem Proved ESP Is Real

                                Which means science is broken.

                                ....
                                It seemed obvious, at first, that Jade Wu was getting punked. In the fall of 2009, the Cornell University undergraduate had come across a posting for a job in the lab of one of the world’s best-known social psychologists. A short while later, she found herself in a conference room, seated alongside several other undergraduate women. “Have you guys heard of extrasensory perception?” Daryl Bem asked the students. They shook their heads.



                                The American government and military believed enough in ESP to fund many projects such as STARGATE and others to test remote viewing, as did the Soviet Union. They had some very interesting results.

                                There is even a film loosely based on it: The Men Who Stared At Goats.
                                Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                                Comment

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