Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Daredevil to Plunge From Outer Space in Supersonic Suit

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Daredevil to Plunge From Outer Space in Supersonic Suit

    I wonder what heat, friction and sonic compression will do to an unprotected human being?

    Luke Aikins / Red Bull Photofiles
    Felix Baumgartner doing the first Red Bull Stratos Full Suit and Helmet Jump

    Skydiving is dangerous -- but not nearly as dangerous as skydiving from a plane in outer space.
    That can kill you. The temperature can freeze your body, and the lack of [COLOR=blue ! important][COLOR=blue ! important]air [COLOR=blue ! important]pressure[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR] can boil your blood.
    Nonetheless, an Austrian daredevil named Felix Baumgartner plans to take the 23-mile plunge from the edge of space. And in the process, he hopes to become the first parachutist to break the sound barrier, plummeting toward the ground at 760 miles per hour.
    But this is no stunt; it's called the Red Bull Stratos project, and the engineers and scientists behind this attempt to break the record for the highest freefall ever -- from 120,000 feet above sea level -- hope it will yield volumes of data that will be used to develop advanced life support systems for future pilots, astronauts, and even space tourists.
    And to do it, they've designed a unique supersonic spacesuit.
    http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2010/...personic-suit/

    I admire his courage and wish him luck.
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

  • #2
    Hmmm... intriguing!

    Me only question would be Why not just drop the instruments?


    On the Plains of Hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who, at the dawn of victory, sat down to rest-and resting... died. Adlai E. Stevenson

    ACG History Today

    BoRG

    Comment


    • #3
      This has been done before long ago as part of the original space flight program. I saw some pics from it back in school.

      Amazing stuff.

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, sorta... but not quite.


        Originally posted by "The Long, Lonely Leap" by Captain Joseph W. Kittinger, Jr. USAF
        (The following is in regard to a record setting high altitude parachute jump from a helium balloon over New Mexico on 16 August 1960)
        "An hour and thirty-one minutes after launch, my pressure altimeter halts at 103,300 feet. At ground control the radar altimeters also have stopped on readings of 102,800 feet, the figure that we later agree upon as the more reliable. It is 7 o'clock in the morning, and I have reached float altitude.
        At zero count I step into space. No wind whistles or billows my clothing. I have absolutely no sensation of the increasing speed with which I fall.

        Though my stabilization chute opens at 96,000 feet, I accelerate for 6,000 feet more before hitting a peak of 614 miles an hour, nine-tenths the speed of sound at my altitude. An Air Force camera on the gondola took this photograph when the cotton clouds still lay 80,000 feet below. At 21,000 feet they rushed up so chillingly that I had to remind myself they were vapor and not solid."




        I was 5 months old...

        Dang...


        Last edited by Admiral; 11 Apr 10, 21:41.
        On the Plains of Hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who, at the dawn of victory, sat down to rest-and resting... died. Adlai E. Stevenson

        ACG History Today

        BoRG

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Admiral View Post
          Hmmm... intriguing!

          Me only question would be Why not just drop the instruments?


          1. Guinness Book of Records

          2. Personal fame, money and endorsements

          3. He's Australian...
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Miss Saigon View Post
            This has been done before long ago as part of the original space flight program. I saw some pics from it back in school.

            Amazing stuff.
            Project High Dive.

            The question in my mind is, can a man survive the sonic compression layer, which shredded WWII and later aircraft?
            Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
              Project High Dive.

              The question in my mind is, can a man survive the sonic compression layer, which shredded WWII and later aircraft?
              The air is so much thinner at 140,000 feet then at the altitudes that damaged aircraft not designed for such stress experienced when forcing themselves to fly so fast. Also, the airflow over the control surfaces is so altered at supersonic speed, on aircraft not designed for it, that the pilot will lose all control. The plane is then destroyed when it starts tumbling out of control.

              At the altitude of the jump, he will past the sound barrier due to the low resistance of that thin air. There will be a balance point reached where the resistance of the thin air will limit the speed of descent. As he reaches a lower altitude, the higher air resistance will slow him down until the speed drops to something like 120 mph near the ground.

              None of this compares to re entry where the object is traveling far faster then the air would let it if just dropped from a given altitude. In that case the air acts like a brick wall as it rapidly tries to slow down the object generating intense heat in the process. For re entry speeds, the less mass to slow down given a large surface area, the less heat will be generated as it slows down that much faster to reach the speed resistance balance point. This is one of the ideas being tested with the private space plane. It orientates itself to present a huge surface area to re entry. It reaches the balance speed quicker without requiring ceramics or ablative materials to keep it from burning up.

              In theory, a feather could survive re entry while a steel ball of the same mass would promptly burn up. An interesting test if there was a way to observe what happens.

              Forgot to mention a lot depends on the angle of entry. If it catches the edge of the atmosphere at the right angle, it will slow down at the right amount before settling into the denser air. Too shallow of an angle for a speed higher then orbital and the object can skip like a stone on water. Too steep and the forces of deacceleration can destroy it. (The brick wall effect of air getting denser too quickly for the given speed.)
              Last edited by SRV Ron; 15 Apr 10, 15:14.
              “Breaking News,”

              “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by SRV Ron View Post
                The air is so much thinner at 140,000 feet then at the altitudes that damaged aircraft not designed for such stress experienced when forcing themselves to fly so fast. Also, the airflow over the control surfaces is so altered at supersonic speed, on aircraft not designed for it, that the pilot will lose all control. The plane is then destroyed when it starts tumbling out of control.

                At the altitude of the jump, he will past the sound barrier due to the low resistance of that thin air. There will be a balance point reached where the resistance of the thin air will limit the speed of descent. As he reaches a lower altitude, the higher air resistance will slow him down until the speed drops to something like 120 mph near the ground.

                None of this compares to re entry where the object is traveling far faster then the air would let it if just dropped from a given altitude. In that case the air acts like a brick wall as it rapidly tries to slow down the object generating intense heat in the process. For re entry speeds, the less mass to slow down given a large surface area, the less heat will be generated as it slows down that much faster to reach the speed resistance balance point. This is one of the ideas being tested with the private space plane. It orientates itself to present a huge surface area to re entry. It reaches the balance speed quicker without requiring ceramics or ablative materials to keep it from burning up.

                In theory, a feather could survive re entry while a steel ball of the same mass would promptly burn up. An interesting test if there was a way to observe what happens.

                Forgot to mention a lot depends on the angle of entry. If it catches the edge of the atmosphere at the right angle, it will slow down at the right amount before settling into the denser air. Too shallow of an angle for a speed higher then orbital and the object can skip like a stone on water. Too steep and the forces of deacceleration can destroy it. (The brick wall effect of air getting denser too quickly for the given speed.)
                Too true, but he's still going to be traveling at over 700 mph, and I don't see anything in the way of control surfaces that he can use at that speed. One twitch and he's an out-of-control mass of broken bones.

                The feather doesn't fall the same way a steel ball does, so that's not a very valid analogy. After all, a guy with a parachute doesn't reach the same speed as someone without one, either.

                I guess we can just wait and see if he craters, at which point the meteorologists and asteroid guys can use him for their research.
                Last edited by Mountain Man; 16 Apr 10, 16:09.
                Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                  The feather doesn't fall the same way a steel ball does, so that's not a very valid analogy. After all, a guy with a parachute doesn't reach the same speed as someone without one, either.

                  I guess we can just wait and see if he craters, at which point the meteorologists and asteroid guys can use him for their research.
                  In a vacuum, a feather will fall at the same rate as a steel ball. The speed is only altered once they start encountering air resistance. At that point the air will alter the speed of the feather at a much faster then the steel ball because of the surface area present. Same effect for a parachute vs a sky diver.

                  Good question on the high altitude sky diver if he can control his attitude in the thin air at high speed or will he start tumbling. Still, the forces of very thin air are not the same as in the lower atmosphere where jumping or ejecting from an aircraft traveling at supersonic speeds could initially rip you apart.
                  Last edited by SRV Ron; 16 Apr 10, 07:54.
                  “Breaking News,”

                  “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                    1. Guinness Book of Records

                    2. Personal fame, money and endorsements

                    3. He's Australian...
                    Austrian....
                    "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
                    Ernest Hemingway.

                    "We're all going to die, all of us; what a circus! That alone should make us love each other, but it doesn't. We are terrorised and flattened by trivialities."
                    Bukowski

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SRV Ron View Post
                      In a vacuum, a feather will fall at the same rate as a steel ball. The speed is only altered once they start encountering air resistance. At that point the air will alter the speed of the feather at a much faster then the steel ball because of the surface area present. Same effect for a parachute vs a sky diver.

                      Good question on the high altitude sky diver if he can control his attitude in the thin air at high speed or will he start tumbling. Still, the forces of very thin air are not the same as in the lower atmosphere where jumping or ejecting from an aircraft traveling at supersonic speeds could initially rip you apart.
                      Again, true...but...actual atmospheric resistance will begin quite high up, which makes the feather analogy inaccurate, just as the feather isn't going to break the sound barrier, either.

                      I wish him luck. I wouldn't do it.
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This has been 'going to' happen for about twelve years, A press release maketh a space program not.

                        When I see a picture of an actual balloon rather than a spiffy suit I will be a little more impressed, since I have seen similar articles over the years from optimists who have failed to get anywhere with this type of project.
                        One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                        "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                        Wu Cheng'en Monkey

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That's a reasonable point, but we can still discuss the potential problems, right?
                          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Fair enough. I am trying to find an accident where an amateur balloonist was killed in the 1960's trying to break this record, from memory his suit failed on the ascent, but I can't find a reference to it so far.
                            One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                            "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                            Wu Cheng'en Monkey

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Heres something I never knew,
                              from
                              http://www.vectorsite.net/avbloon_3.html

                              * The USSR also performed a series of manned balloon flights in the late 1950s and early 1960s under the "Volga" program to evaluate space suits and other space technologies. The Soviet effort faded out about the same time as the parallel US effort, and was also marked by a tragedy.

                              On 1 November 1962, two experienced Red Air Force parachutists, Major Yevgenny Andreyev and Colonel Pyotr Dolgov, were sent up in a high-altitude balloon to test survival systems for the Vostok manned space capsule. Andreyev was to test a new non-explosive Vostok ejection seat, wearing a conventional military high-altitude pressure suit; he punched out at 24,460 meters (83,500 feet) and landed safely. Dolgov was wearing a full space suit and his jump was to test its integrity; he punched out at 28,640 meters (93,970 feet). His parachute did deploy, but the recovery team found him quite dead. The faceplate had hit the gondola on the way out and cracked, with the suit depressurizing at high altitude.

                              BACK_TO_TOP
                              One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                              "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                              Wu Cheng'en Monkey

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X