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University of Kansas researcher investigates mysterious stone spheres in Costa Rica

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  • University of Kansas researcher investigates mysterious stone spheres in Costa Rica



    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-uok032210.php

    http://people.ku.edu/~hoopes/

  • #2
    Nice catch.
    I became aware of the stones in early 70's while doing Mayan research of the area. But I had not heard anything about them since then. Good to see someone is performing detailed research. Back then the stones had been loosely associated with the Olmec culture. Interested to see where current research leads.
    Last edited by BriteLite; 24 Mar 10, 09:41.

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    • #3
      Interesting technique being used to associate the spheres linguistically. Forget the Olmecs.

      Hoopes says:http://web.ku.edu/~hoopes/balls/errors.htm
      "The Makers of the Balls
      George Erikson states that "archaeologists attributed the spheres to the Chorotega Indians". No archaeologist familiar with the evidence has ever made this claim. The Chorotega were an Oto-Manguean speaking group that occupied an area of Guanacaste, near the Gulf of Nicoya in northwestern Costa Rica. The peoples who lived in the area where the balls are found were Chibchan speakers. The balls have been found in association with architectural remains, such as stone walls and pavements made of river cobbles, and both whole and broken pottery vessels that are consistent with finds at other sites associated with the Aguas Buenas and Chiriquí cultures. These are believed to represent native peoples ancestral to historical Chibchan-speaking group of southern Costa Rica.
      "

      I like this technique. Further investigation will prove the validity but it is a fresh idea in conjunction with other techniques which by nature can result in stale presentations.

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      • #4
        Every time I see something about these balls on the internets, I instinctively cringe. Nice to see some serious work on them getting out there.
        Every 10 years a great man.
        Who paid the bill?

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        • #5
          Why do you "cringe"? The program I saw about them attempted to be intelligent and unbiased. Of course, it wasn't on The History Channel...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
            Why do you "cringe"? The program I saw about them attempted to be intelligent and unbiased. Of course, it wasn't on The History Channel...
            These balls have a remarkable internet presence thanks to this list, which has been circulating on the internet for years, and ends up in my feeds at least once a week.

            The 10 Most Puzzling Ancient Artifacts
            Every 10 years a great man.
            Who paid the bill?

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