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  • Linguistics Web Site

    For anyone interested in linguistics, I found a great Web site, which is run by the Max Plank Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. It is called the World Atlas of Language Structures Online:

    http://wals.info/index

  • #2
    Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
    For anyone interested in linguistics, I found a great Web site, which is run by the Max Plank Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. It is called the World Atlas of Language Structures Online:

    http://wals.info/index
    That is cool!

    Mapping the evolution of language.
    Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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    • #3
      Another Web Site: Identify American dialects

      I also found an interesting site on American Dialects last night. It has twelve speakers on it. I thought I was good at this, but I only got 3 of the twelve right: the New England male who sounded just like me, the Mid-Atlantic/New York male who sounded just like some people I knew in college, and the Northern/Great Lakes female who sounded like some women I used to know. I didn't even get the New England female. I was surprised I had no clue on Southern, since I spent some time in Atlanta when I was younger.

      I went to college in Pittsburgh. It and much of Pennsylvania and West Virginia is not on the map. Also not on the map is Florida and a strip of the Plains heading roughly from the Western Dakotas south through Western Nebraska and Kansas down to the Mexican border. Is this roughly the line where farming can take place year-to-year without irrigation?

      The website is http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/am...s/map/map.html

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      • #4
        Thanks for these links, Gentlemen. Language is another of my varied interests. This is fun!
        History is the version of past events that people have decided to agree upon. Napoleon Bonaparte
        _________
        BoRG
        __________
        "I am Arthur, King of the Britons!"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
          I also found an interesting site on American Dialects last night. It has twelve speakers on it. I thought I was good at this, but I only got 3 of the twelve right: the New England male who sounded just like me, the Mid-Atlantic/New York male who sounded just like some people I knew in college, and the Northern/Great Lakes female who sounded like some women I used to know. I didn't even get the New England female. I was surprised I had no clue on Southern, since I spent some time in Atlanta when I was younger.

          I went to college in Pittsburgh. It and much of Pennsylvania and West Virginia is not on the map. Also not on the map is Florida and a strip of the Plains heading roughly from the Western Dakotas south through Western Nebraska and Kansas down to the Mexican border. Is this roughly the line where farming can take place year-to-year without irrigation?

          The website is http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/am...s/map/map.html
          I don't think there's really a demarcation line; but non-irrigated crop lands are certainly more prevalent east of that line and agriculture would be very difficult without irrigation to the west.

          I have a National Geographic Historical Atlas of the United States; one of the sections traces the development of regional dialects. I found it very interesting because I grew up in Connecticut, but my Dad and his family were from northern Florida. So I developed a hybrid dialect. Most people tell me that I don't have a discernible accent; but I use an odd variety of slang words.
          Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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          • #6
            I score an F-...

            West 1/2
            South 2/2
            Midland 1/2
            North 0/2
            New England 0/2
            Mid-Atlantic 0/2

            4/12... 33%
            Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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            • #7
              I only had 2 of the 12 correct! But the one sentence only was very hard to determine. And I think they purposely mislead with the content.
              History is the version of past events that people have decided to agree upon. Napoleon Bonaparte
              _________
              BoRG
              __________
              "I am Arthur, King of the Britons!"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Torien View Post
                I only had 2 of the 12 correct! But the one sentence only was very hard to determine. And I think they purposely mislead with the content.
                Both of my correct answers for West and Midland were WAG's...
                Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
                  Both of my correct answers for West and Midland were WAG's...
                  I was certain that I had all 12 correct when I pressed "Submit"!

                  Boy, was I wrong.
                  History is the version of past events that people have decided to agree upon. Napoleon Bonaparte
                  _________
                  BoRG
                  __________
                  "I am Arthur, King of the Britons!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Torien View Post
                    I was certain that I had all 12 correct when I pressed "Submit"!

                    Boy, was I wrong.
                    All but 2 sounded like Yankees to me...
                    Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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                    • #11
                      Good grief! I actually got half of them right, using the SWAG technique!

                      Fascintating stuff, LC.
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                      • #12
                        Interesting article on the Germanic languages. Says that about 30% of the words in the Germanic languages have no related word in any other Indo-European language.

                        http://www.knowledgerush.com/kr/ency...ts_of_Germanic

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
                          Interesting article on the Germanic languages. Says that about 30% of the words in the Germanic languages have no related word in any other Indo-European language.

                          http://www.knowledgerush.com/kr/ency...ts_of_Germanic
                          On the other hand, words in Indo-European have no counterparts in German.

                          Not too surprising. A lot of languages have unique phrases, words and terms.
                          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                          • #14
                            Website on North American Indian Languages

                            Interesting website on North American Indian Languages. I'm interested in Abanaki Indians, as they were in the Vermont/Quebec borderlands my mother's father's people were from (of New France extraction). I have no knowledge that I have Indian blood in me, but I would be proud if I did. Does anyone have knowledge if there was substantial intermarriage in Quebec between Europeans and Natives before 1850, anything like say for example on the US/Colonial frontier as it moved West?

                            http://www.native-languages.org/
                            Last edited by lakechampainer; 15 Nov 09, 20:02.

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                            • #15
                              Excellent web site for language learning

                              I found an excellent web site for language learning. It is helpful to me in trying to learn German. It is provided by an American woman who was a French major in college and continues to work in and study languages. There are a total of 15 languages with varying levels of tutorials. The web site is called Indo-European Languages. Also a very good section on linguistics, including phonetics.

                              http://www.ielanguages.com/languages.html
                              Last edited by lakechampainer; 29 Nov 09, 18:59.

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