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  • Again, being closest thing to an Astronomy focused thread ...

    When is a nova not a nova? When a white dwarf and a brown dwarf collide
    https://phys.org/news/2018-10-nova-w...n-collide.html
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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    • Originally posted by MarkV View Post

      Old news - this has been known for at least a decade and has even been the subject of QI trap questions on the BBC
      Ever consider this might be an update ...
      Meanwhile, how about a link ???
      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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      • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post

        Ever consider this might be an update ...
        Meanwhile, how about a link ???
        Starting with 2008

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGgmmX-dzgU
        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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        • 'Farout!' Newfound Object Is the Farthest Solar System Body Ever Spotted
          ...
          https://www.space.com/42755-farout-f...discovery.html
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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          • Part of the EM spectrum so an "image" of sorts;

            Repeated radio signals coming from galaxy 1.5 billion light years away, scientists announce

            https://www.independent.co.uk/life-s...-a8719886.html
            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

            Comment


            • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
              Part of the EM spectrum so an "image" of sorts;

              Repeated radio signals coming from galaxy 1.5 billion light years away, scientists announce

              https://www.independent.co.uk/life-s...-a8719886.html
              That's quite interesting, I will refrain from drawing conclusions though...

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              • Originally posted by joea View Post

                That's quite interesting, I will refrain from drawing conclusions though...
                You have to turn off one's ad blocker to view the site. For those who don't want to do this these are probably better
                https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46811618
                https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46825450
                Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                Comment


                • Interesting Lunar eclipse last night. Stepped out a few times to get views as it progressed.
                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                  • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                    Interesting Lunar eclipse last night. Stepped out a few times to get views as it progressed.
                    It was certainly impressive out here!
                    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                    • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                      Interesting Lunar eclipse last night. Stepped out a few times to get views as it progressed.
                      A meteor hit the moon during the lunar eclipse. Here's what we know.

                      https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/techn...z&ocid=msnbcrd
                      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                      • Astronomers make an accidental discovery: The tiny dwarf galaxy Bedin 1

                        One of the amazing things about scientific research is that we don’t only learn about the things we’re looking at — sometimes we make amazing discoveries by chance as well. That’s what happened this week, when astronomers accidentally discovered a new galaxy while studying part of the Milky Way.

                        Astronomers were using data from the Hubble Space Telescope to study white dwarf stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752, a spherical group of stars that orbit around the core of the Milky Way. They were hoping to learn about how old the globular cluster is by studying these stars, but in the process they found something unexpected. When looking at an area right on the edge of the field of view of Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys, they spotted a clump of faint stars. But on further inspection of their brightness and temperatures, the scientists realized that these stars were not a part of the globular cluster and were in fact much, much more distant.
                        ...



                        ...
                        https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-t...alaxy-bedin-1/
                        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                        • Here's an interesting slide show ...

                          Nature from space: Amazing photos of our planet
                          https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/techn...z&ocid=msnbcrd
                          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                          • A Star in the Big Dipper Is an Alien Invader

                            ...


                            In a computer simulation of spiral galaxy formation, a halo structure partially forms from a pileup of many small galaxies. Even after merged galaxies disintegrate, individual stars retain chemical traces from their original galaxies.
                            (Image: © Takayuki Saito/Takaaki Takeda/Sorahiko Nukatani/4D2U Project, NAOJ)


                            A star in the Big Dipper is an intergalactic alien, according to clues in its chemical fingerprints.
                            The star's unusual chemistry is unlike that of all known stars in the Milky Way and instead has more in common with stars in nearby dwarf galaxies, new research reveals.
                            Researchers suspected that the stellar oddball, named J1124+4535, originated in a dwarf galaxy that collided with the Milky Way long ago. According to that theory, when the dwarf galaxy fell apart, it stranded this star in our cosmic neighborhood.
                            ...
                            https://www.space.com/weirdo-star-fr...er-galaxy.html
                            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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