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  • The College Student Who Decoded the Data Hidden in Inca Knots

    Manny Medrano cut loose on spring break by analyzing a set of khipus.

    ...
    There are many ways a college student might spend spring break. Making an archaeological breakthrough is not usually one of them. In his first year at Harvard, Manny Medrano did just that.

    “There’s something in me, I can’t explain where it came from, but I love the idea of digging around and trying to find secrets hidden from the past,” Medrano says.

    With the help of his professor, Gary Urton, a scholar of Pre-Columbian studies, Medrano interpreted a set of six khipus, knotted cords used for record keeping in the Inca Empire. By matching the khipus to a colonial-era Spanish census document, Medrano and Urton uncovered the meaning of the cords in greater detail than ever before. Their findings could contribute to a better understanding of daily life in the Andean civilization.
    ...
    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/t...=pocket-newtab
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

    Comment


    • The Ancient Peruvian Mystery Solved From Space

      These puzzling holes in the arid valleys of southern Peru tell us there was once a flourishing, sophisticated society here.

      ...
      https://getpocket.com/explore/item/t...=pocket-newtab
      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
      “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

      Comment


      • A Mysterious 25,000-Year-Old Structure Built of the Bones of 60 Mammoths

        The purpose of such an elaborate structure remains a big open question

        .........
        A jaw-dropping example of Ice Age architecture has been unearthed on Russia’s forest steppe: a huge, circular structure built with the bones of at least 60 woolly mammoths. But exactly why hunter-gatherers enduring the frigid realities of life 25,000 years ago would construct the 40-foot diameter building is a fascinating question.

        “Clearly a lot of time and effort went into building this structure so it was obviously important to the people that made it for some reason,” says Alexander Pryor, an archaeologist at the University of Exeter (U.K.). He is the lead author of a new study published this week in the journal Antiquity describing the find at Kostenki, a place where many important Paleolithic sites lie clustered around the Don River.
        ....
        https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scien...sia-180974426/
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
        “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

        Comment


        • “There’s evidence that there were natural freshwater springs in the area which would have remained liquid throughout the year,” he says. “That warmed water would have drawn animals, including mammoth, and in turn attracted humans to the same spot.”
          Interesting - the full study is presumably to be found here,

          let me just post the link here for future reference, tnx.

          http://www.antiquity.ac.uk/open
          Lambert of Montaigu - Crusader.

          Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

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          • Seeing evidence presented of a central butchering and processing site, but none about an actual structure?
            Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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            • Sort of related to title;
              Pop Culture Gargoyles Hidden in Gothic Architecture

              Bring binoculars.

              https://getpocket.com/explore/item/p...=pocket-newtab
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
              “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

              Comment


              • In the Land of Kush

                A dazzling civilization flourished in Sudan nearly 5,000 years ago. Why was it forgotten?

                https://www.smithsonianmag.com/trave...=pocket-newtab
                TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

                Comment



                • The Lost Languages Discovered in One of the World’s Oldest Continuously Run Libraries

                  Centuries-old texts were erased, and then written over, by monks at Saint Catherine’s Monastery in Egypt.

                  ....
                  Saint Catherine’s Monastery, a sacred Christian site nestled in the shadow of Mount Sinai, is home to one of the world’s oldest continuously used libraries. Thousands of manuscripts and books are kept there—some of which contain hidden treasures.

                  Now, as Jeff Farrell reports for the Independent, a team of researchers is using new technology to uncover texts that were erased and written over by the monks who lived and worked at the monastery. Many of these original texts were written in languages well known to researchers—Latin, Greek, Arabic—but others were inscribed in long-lost languages that are rarely seen in the historical record.

                  Manuscripts with multiple layers of writing are known as palimpsests, and there are about 130 of them at St. Catherine’s Monastery, according to the website of the Early Manuscript Electronic Library, which has been leading the initiative to uncover the original texts. As Richard Gray explains in the Atlantic, with the rise of Islam in the 7th century, Christian sites in the Sinai Desert began to disappear, and Saint Catherine’s found itself in relative isolation. Monks turned to reusing older parchments when supplies at the monastery ran scarce.

                  To uncover the palimpsests’ secret texts, researchers photographed thousands of pages multiple times, illuminating each page with different-colored lights. They also photographed the pages with light shining onto them from behind, or from an oblique angle, which helped “highlight tiny bumps and depressions in the surface,” Gray writes. They then fed the information into a computer algorithm, which is able to distinguish the more recent texts from the originals.
                  ....
                  https://getpocket.com/explore/item/l...=pocket-newtab


                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                  “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

                  Comment


                  • Thanks for the Atlantic citation.
                    Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

                    Comment


                    • This may be a bit esoteric, but with so many enigmas from the distant past, ....
                      https://beforeatlantis.com/
                      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                      “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

                      Comment

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