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  • Archaeologists Unearth 14,000 Year Old Hidden Treasure
    ...
    1. In The Pines

    Off the west coast of Canada, on a tiny remote island deep in the green of the Great Bear Rainforest, a team of archaeologists was hard at work. On their hands and knees in the cold mud, they were digging on a fool’s hope, an ancient folk tale.
    ...
    There, in the chilly muck of the pit, they made a startling discovery. Buried beneath the soil were the remains of a hearth, with burned pieces of charcoal. Finding this ancient oven, let alone anything, went against the grain of all historical knowledge up until then. How was it possible, and what could it possibly mean?
    ...
    3. A Wealth Of Artifacts

    As they continued digging, the team kept on stumbling across more and more surprises long concealed by the earth. There were archaic versions of weapons, and tools for hunting, fishing, and lighting fires. Students and scientists alike were astounded by the amount of artifacts.
    ...
    The Heiltsuk people, the First Nation indigenous to the Great Bear Rainforest, had always said that the very first of their people had sheltered from the Ice Age in this same place, the mysterious Triquet Island. But scientists and archaeologists opposed their claims, believing they had no basis according to prehistory. So how could this be possible?
    ...
    http://www.directexpose.com/triquet-...archaeology/1/
    Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

    Comment


    • Second ancient Egyptian sphinx may have been discovered near Valley of the Kings, experts say

      Statue dating back possible 4,000 years unearthed by construction workers improving city road
      https://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...-a8487586.html
      Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
      Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

      Comment


      • Could go in another thread or two, maybe, but a dig into the past so ...

        Treasure Hunters Uncover 220-Year-Old Treasure On Oak Island
        https://healevate.com/treasure-hunte...a-Treasure2-US
        Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
        Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

        Comment


        • World's Oldest Customer Complaint Goes Viral

          ...
          A 3,800-year-old Babylonian tablet from the ancient Sumerian city-state of Ur in Mesopotamia—now Tell el-Muqayyar—is the oldest documented customer complaint known to man.

          In the clay tablet, a man named Nanni whined to merchant Ea-nasir about how he was delivered the wrong grade of cooper ore. “How have you treated me for that copper?” he wrote. “You have withheld my money bag from me in enemy territory; it is now up to you to restore [my money] to me in full.”

          The message was written in the Akkadian language, an extinct East Semitic language that was spoken in ancient Mesopotamia from the 30th century B.C.E. until it was replaced. The tablet is currently sitting at the British Museum in London.
          ...
          https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...ral/ar-BBMnHFO
          Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
          Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

          Comment


          • Why 536 AD was the worst year to be alive: Scientists say a mysterious fog that blocked out the sun causing crop failures and widespread famine was the worst global disaster in history
            • 536AD was the start of 18 months of solid darkness caused by a mysterious fog
            • Harvard professor believes this is the worst year in the entirety of human history
            • Triggered a century of famine, crop failure, cold weather, disease and death
            https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...ear-alive.html
            Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
            Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

            Comment


            • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
              Why 536 AD was the worst year to be alive: Scientists say a mysterious fog that blocked out the sun causing crop failures and widespread famine was the worst global disaster in history[LIST][*]536AD was the start of 18 months of solid darkness caused by a mysterious fog
              ]
              Gross and rather silly exaggeration Solid darkness for 18 months would have wiped out almost all life.The probability is that a major eruption caused a diminution of sunlight and concomitant weather effects
              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

              Comment


              • The dailyfail, even wiki has banned them.
                "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
                Ernest Hemingway.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by MarkV View Post

                  Gross and rather silly exaggeration Solid darkness for 18 months would have wiped out almost all life.The probability is that a major eruption caused a diminution of sunlight and concomitant weather effects
                  "Exaggeration" might apply, but one could try reading further in the article to see this;
                  ....
                  Michael McCormick, a Harvard University archaeologist and medieval historian, told Science Magazine that the world did not show signs of recovery until 640AD.

                  'It was the beginning of one of the worst periods to be alive, if not the worst year,' Dr McCormick said.

                  The eerie fog created a drab world with darkness residing over the northern hemisphere for 18 months, with an unrelenting dusk persevering through day and night.
                  ....
                  Which includes the link to this source article (which actually provides more detail, etc.);
                  https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018...et_cid=2490907

                  But hey, just because this is a history forum doesn't mean one should be investigative or thorough before casting stones, or spitting into the wind.
                  Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                  Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                  Comment


                  • Genetic analysis indicates that between 50,000 to 100,000 years ago the world's human population was almost wiped out with no more than between 3,000 to 10,000 individuals surviving. As a species we are lucky to be here. The cause of this near extinction is still being argued over but one strong candidate is the eruption 75,000 years ago of the Toba super volcano in Indonesia the effects of which lasted centuries. Not a good time to be around

                    There is also evidence of a major population crash in the Neolithic period when numbers may have fallen by as much as 60% the cause is not yet known

                    Being around during the three waves of the Black Death can't have been a barrel of laughs either.

                    536 would have been pretty bad but not as much as these
                    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                    Comment


                    • Nice thread, keep up the good work.
                      We hunt the hunters

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                        Could go in another thread or two, maybe, but a dig into the past so ...

                        Treasure Hunters Uncover 220-Year-Old Treasure On Oak Island
                        https://healevate.com/treasure-hunte...a-Treasure2-US
                        That program has been running for years on TV, and they still haven't brought up any real "treasure". It remains one of the most interesting mysteries, though.
                        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                          Genetic analysis indicates that between 50,000 to 100,000 years ago the world's human population was almost wiped out with no more than between 3,000 to 10,000 individuals surviving. As a species we are lucky to be here. The cause of this near extinction is still being argued over but one strong candidate is the eruption 75,000 years ago of the Toba super volcano in Indonesia the effects of which lasted centuries. Not a good time to be around

                          There is also evidence of a major population crash in the Neolithic period when numbers may have fallen by as much as 60% the cause is not yet known

                          Being around during the three waves of the Black Death can't have been a barrel of laughs either.

                          536 would have been pretty bad but not as much as these
                          Basically the same effects on climate and crops as nuclear winter. Not only does blocked sunlight lower the overall temperature and negatively effect crops, but the high levels of sulphur ejected into the atmosphere combine with moisture to produce acid rain, further damaging crops and livestock who depend on the forage.

                          Perhaps the most concerning thing is that such an event today, bringing humanity down to that number, would likely result in complete extinction. We have largely lost our ability to survive under harsh conditions without the enormous and highly technical logistical system that links supplies and markets and keeps things moving around the world. Living off the land is a lost art.
                          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

                            Basically the same effects on climate and crops as nuclear winter. Not only does blocked sunlight lower the overall temperature and negatively effect crops, but the high levels of sulphur ejected into the atmosphere combine with moisture to produce acid rain, further damaging crops and livestock who depend on the forage.

                            Perhaps the most concerning thing is that such an event today, bringing humanity down to that number, would likely result in complete extinction. We have largely lost our ability to survive under harsh conditions without the enormous and highly technical logistical system that links supplies and markets and keeps things moving around the world. Living off the land is a lost art.
                            Sulphur-dioxide not Sulphur

                            Species survival even then was probably down to chance as much as anything. Chance in that there must have been pockets where conditions were sufficiently benign for a large enough group to survive to provide an adequately diverse gene pool. A widely dispersed population of rugged survivors would otherwise have died out through the results of in breeding. It must have been a close run thing.

                            Plenty of people in this world who still have the ability to live off the land. They live in the rain forests, in the Arctic and on the fringes of the world's deserts and increasingly their habitat is being stolen, burnt out and generally destroyed by greedy corporations and individuals. In the Western world there are plenty of self delusional people who claim to know how to live off the land but once they run out of ammunition and their steel hunting knife is blunted they would starve. My father was an English public schoolboy who spent WW2 as a back room type setting up scrambler systems, protection against electronic tapping (bugging) of lines etc for Allied communications centres (and indeed as late as the 60s was sometimes consulted on protecting communications against electromagnetic pulses). Nevertheless as an adolescent in the holidays he had been 'coached' by one of the last genuine Lincolnshire poachers and could pick up a couple of stones and a length of line and go out in the night and come back with a rabbit or a pheasant which my Irish mum knew how to turn into a meal. That's what i would call an ability to live of the land
                            Last edited by MarkV; 17 Nov 18, 19:21.
                            Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                            Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                              Genetic analysis indicates that between 50,000 to 100,000 years ago the world's human population was almost wiped out with no more than between 3,000 to 10,000 individuals surviving. As a species we are lucky to be here. The cause of this near extinction is still being argued over but one strong candidate is the eruption 75,000 years ago of the Toba super volcano in Indonesia the effects of which lasted centuries. Not a good time to be around

                              There is also evidence of a major population crash in the Neolithic period when numbers may have fallen by as much as 60% the cause is not yet known

                              Being around during the three waves of the Black Death can't have been a barrel of laughs either.

                              536 would have been pretty bad but not as much as these
                              According to that article I presented/linked, the eruption of 536 may have been a significant factor helping with producing the "Black Death" (which was mostly an European and Euro-Asian event).

                              In any event, it(eruption and its effects) appears to have been mostly a Northern Hemisphere effect/event.

                              If you have any sources on this human population decline of 50,000-100,000 years ago, I'd appreciate being able to look them over.
                              Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                              Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                              Comment


                              • This could fit into a "climate change" thread also ...

                                Humans didn't cause mass animal extinctions in Africa, like previously thought, study says
                                ....
                                A new study disagrees with a longstanding view that humans wiped out large animals that previously occupied Africa.

                                In research published in the journal Science on Friday, authors analyzed records on megaherbivore communities in eastern Africa over seven million years. A megaherbivore is a mammal weighing more than 2,000 pounds. They concluded that extinctions of diverse mammal communities in Africa occurred before evidence of human hunting.

                                The animal decline might have instead been because of environmental factors such as declining atmospheric carbon dioxide and expansion of grasslands, researchers write.

                                "Low CO2 levels favor tropical grasses over trees, and as a consequence savannas became less woody and more open through time," John Rowan, a postdoctoral scientist from the University of Massachusetts Amherst who was involved in the research, said in a statement. "We know that many of the extinct megaherbivores fed on woody vegetation, so they seem to disappear alongside their food source."
                                ...
                                https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...ys/2090400002/
                                Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                                TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                                Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                                Comment

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