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Is Betelgeuse, the red giant star in the constellation Orion, going to explode?

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  • Is Betelgeuse, the red giant star in the constellation Orion, going to explode?

    The star, named Betelgeuse, has dimmed its brightness so significantly that you can see the difference with the naked eye.

    There's been speculation that this dimming means Betelgeuse will turn into a supernova, which has some astronomy fans excited.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-...ode3f/11828624
    "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
    Ernest Hemingway.

  • #2
    Wow if it does blow in the next few months say (unlikely according to the aricle) it would mean that for all modern history that Betelguese was already gone...
    Last edited by joea; 27 Dec 19, 04:48.

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    • #3
      They think it has 100,000 years left in it, but if it does Ford Prefect and Zaphod Beeblebrox wont be happy
      Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

      That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

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      • #4
        Might as well. Give us something else to think about. Happens all of the time, BTW, throughout the universe. Eventually, it will happen to us.
        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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        • #5
          Also from he link;
          "
          "Odds are, this (dimming) is not the precursor to the supernova explosion — although that doesn't stop us having a look occasionally to make sure it's still there, faint and red rather than this bright explosion," he says.

          Even if Betelgeuse did go supernova, we won't see the light show instantly.

          The star is roughly 700 light-years away, so what we see in the sky now actually occurred several hundred years in the past.

          "We see Betelgeuse now as it was about 700 years ago, so it's possible that Betelgeuse went supernova 500 years ago, and we wouldn't know about it for another two centuries," Dr Brown says.

          "In astronomer terms and in terms of the age of the universe, yes, Betelgeuse will go supernova 'soon'. In terms of our lifetimes, unfortunately, we're probably going to miss out on seeing Betelgeuse go supernova, which is sort of a pity because it would be quite a show."
          "

          If it did super nova, distance makes us fairly safe from any adverse effects.

          Also note that the photo of Orion in the linked article is upside down;
          A picture of Orion from 2015 as seen looking north, photographed at around 10 pm AEDT.

          Should be;

          Using Orion to find stars in neighbor constellations
          Also;

          Constellation Orion as it can be seen by the naked eye
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_(constellation)


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          • #6
            Edit to see if this forum constrains my posting or if Atlantic limited copy-paste(underline doesn't work as link)

            (or something else ??? )

            The Biggest Celestial Event of the Year Could Happen Tomorrow
            ... or, well, maybe not for 100,000 years
            ....
            The supernova wouldn’t harm Earth. Betelgeuse isn’t the sort of star whose demise would produce radiation that could roil the planet’s atmosphere. At about 650 light-years from here, Betelgeuse is nearby on a cosmic scale, but thankfully not close enough to cause any damage.
            ...
            The supernova wouldn’t harm Earth. Betelgeuse isn’t the sort of star whose demise would produce radiation that could roil the planet’s atmosphere. At about 650 light-years from here, Betelgeuse is nearby on a cosmic scale, but thankfully not close enough to cause any damage.
            ...
            The most recent nearby supernova appeared long before people could panic about it on Twitter, in 1987, but it could be seen only in very dark parts of the Southern Hemisphere, far from artificial lights. Other examples are found even deeper in history, in 1604 and 1054. Betelgeuse would provide a far better show; the other stars were thousands of light-years from Earth, rather than hundreds.
            ...

            https://www.theatlantic.com/science/...=pocket-newtab
            Last edited by G David Bock; 24 Jan 20, 15:31.

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            • #7
              Nobody knows what’s going on with the colossal nearby star Betelgeuse

              ...
              One of the more interesting astronomy stories that came out at the tail end of 2019 was the bizarre behavior of the nearby star known as Betelgeuse. It sits somewhere between 520 and 650 light-years from Earth, and that’s extremely close in the grand scheme of things, making its behavior of particular interest to us here on Earth.

              Months ago, scientists alerted us to the fact that Betelgeuse is getting dimmer. This massive star is currently a red supergiant, and the fact that it appeared to be dimming hinted at a number of possible outcomes, including a possible collapse and supernova explosion. Now, with several more weeks of observations under their belt, researchers have discovered that Betelgeuse isn’t just dimming, it’s dimming in a very bizarre way.

              As Phil Plait of SYFY Wire reports, high-resolution images captured by the Very Large Telescope reveal that Betelgeuse is indeed dimming… but only part of it is actually changing in brightness. Check it out:
              ...
              “The red supergiant star Betelgeuse, in the constellation of Orion, has been undergoing unprecedented dimming,” the European Southern Observatory writes. “This stunning image of the star’s surface, taken with the SPHERE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope late last year, is among the first observations to come out of an observing campaign aimed at understanding why the star is becoming fainter. When compared with the image taken in January 2019, it shows how much the star has faded and how its apparent shape has changed.”

              Because only part of the star is changing in brightness, its shape appears to be altered, giving it an oblong appearance as opposed to a more uniform circular shape. So, what’s the deal?
              ...
              https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/techn...1gW?li=BBnbfcL

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              • #8
                Originally posted by joea View Post
                Wow if it does blow in the next few months say (unlikely according to the aricle) it would mean that for all modern history that Betelguese was already gone...
                rEFUGEES, 650 YEARS AGO:
                http://theghostdiaries.com/wp-conten...3/jesusUFO.jpg
                The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by marktwain View Post
                  More likely from Sirius ... or Geminga

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                  • #10
                    "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
                    Ernest Hemingway.

                    Comment

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