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The demise of coal power.

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  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
    Truth is, the Libbies don't like any reliable source of power, until it comes to their own personal comforts. What they want is to live in fantasy world where everything works by magic.
    You actually have a point there.
    Coal fired electricity is 'tamper resistant'- plants can be more secure against intrusion. Hydro power dams can be vulnerable to a terror or nuisance attack.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Achtung Baby View Post

    I'm not convinced the price will fall, we've been promised similar claims back when it was privatised. The problem is, the high price has driven people to install solar panels etc. The other issue is that the brown coal plants are proving problematic in the extreme hot days and one of the major transmission lines tripped.
    Nuclear power is being ignored when it shouldn't.
    Our power grid is likely o trip no matter what the power source is. It is extremely vulnerable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Truth is, the Libbies don't like any reliable source of power, until it comes to their own personal comforts. What they want is to live in fantasy world where everything works by magic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Achtung Baby
    replied
    Originally posted by G David Bock View Post

    Maybe should let Tom Steyer know that. After using USA coal to build his fortune he then moved on to Australian coal, and also decided to get involved in the "climate change" political actions here in USA
    ...
    I'm not convinced the price will fall, we've been promised similar claims back when it was privatised. The problem is, the high price has driven people to install solar panels etc. The other issue is that the brown coal plants are proving problematic in the extreme hot days and one of the major transmission lines tripped.
    Nuclear power is being ignored when it shouldn't.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Originally posted by Achtung Baby View Post
    Prices are expected to gradually fall over the next two years in Australia, while the private sector won't be touching new coal power generation with a barge pole.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-02-...inues/11966652
    Maybe should let Tom Steyer know that. After using USA coal to build his fortune he then moved on to Australian coal, and also decided to get involved in the "climate change" political actions here in USA
    ...
    In January 1986, Steyer founded Farallon Capital, a hedge fund firm headquartered in San Francisco, California.[13][14] Steyer made his fortune running Farallon, which was managing $20 billion by the time he left the company.[15] Steyer was known for taking high risks on distressed assets within volatile markets.[8]

    In October 2012, Steyer stepped down from his position at Farallon in order to focus on advocating for alternative energy.[16][17] Steyer decided to dispose of his carbon-polluting investments in 2012, although critics say he did not dispose of them quickly enough and noted that the lifespan of the facilities he funded would extend through 2030.[18] A 2014 New York Times article said coal-mining companies that Farallon invested in or lent money to under Steyer had increased their coal production by 70 million tons annually since receiving money from Farallon, and that Steyer remained invested in the Maules Creek coal mine.[18] Prior to Steyer leaving Farallon, a student activist group called UnFarallon criticized the company for investments in companies with anti-environmental policies.[8] In 2016, some critics noted that Farallon had also invested in private prisons while Steyer was leading the hedge fund.[19] According to SEC filings, Steyer was at the helm as the hedge fund purchased nearly $90 million of Corrections Corporation of America stock (5.5% of the company's outstanding shares).[20] After leaving Farallon, Steyer hosted a two-day think-tank entitled the 'Big Think Climate Meeting' to discuss how to address climate change.[21]
    ...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Steyer

    Leave a comment:


  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Achtung Baby View Post
    Prices are expected to gradually fall over the next two years in Australia, while the private sector won't be touching new coal power generation with a barge pole.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-02-...inues/11966652
    One use to be considered for renewable energy is reverse osmosis water purification. The systems are, output flexible-= when energy supply is high, you can process and store purified water. The Reclaimed water becomes a de4 facto battery.

    A small amount of baseload is, apparently, called for to prevent the systems form inadvertently back washing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Achtung Baby
    replied
    Prices are expected to gradually fall over the next two years in Australia, while the private sector won't be touching new coal power generation with a barge pole.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-02-...inues/11966652

    Leave a comment:


  • Achtung Baby
    replied
    My state is currently experiencing very high temps and last night one of the brown coal power plants suffered a setback, one generator went offline. So we've been told to conserve power use to avoid outages. Last January the same power station had 6 incidents in just a few weeks. The extreme heatwaves are pushing the coal power stations into the unreliable territory now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Achtung Baby View Post
    And in the end, we follow the money...

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-...fuels/11903928
    And the money favors coal being used for energy production all over the world. China, for example, cannot afford to convert to much of anything else, because they have a lot of coal, but very little oil, and if they run out, they will buy it from whomever has it, including us. That's how international trade works.

    Leave a comment:


  • Achtung Baby
    replied
    And in the end, we follow the money...

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-...fuels/11903928

    Leave a comment:


  • ralfy
    replied
    The catch is developing economies. They make up the bulk of the global population, need lots of energy and material resources to industrialize, and is the main source of consumer markets.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    In the rare case any here might want to look at modern technological solutions;
    ...
    Flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) is a set of technologies used to remove sulfur dioxide (SO
    2
    ) from exhaust flue gases of fossil-fuel power plants, and from the emissions of other sulfur oxide emitting processes such as waste incineration.
    ...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flue-gas_desulfurization

    As a start point (again)

    Leave a comment:


  • Marmat
    replied
    No surprise here, but interesting all the same

    From the National Post:

    Coal, the most polluting fossil fuel, is still the world's favourite for electricity generation
    Global coal consumption is likely to rise over the coming years, driven by demand in India, China and Southeast Asia

    Coal consumption is set to rise in the coming years as growing demand for electricity in developing countries outpaces a shift to cleaner sources of electricity in industrialized nations.

    While use of the most polluting fossil fuel had a historic dip in 2019, the International Energy Agency anticipates steady increases in the next five years. That means the world will face a significant challenge in meeting pledges to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming.

    “There are few signs of change,” the agency wrote in its annual coal report released in Paris on Tuesday. “Despite all the policy changes and announcements, our forecast is very similar to those we have made over the past few years.”

    While this year is on track for biggest decline ever for coal power, that’s mostly due to high growth in hydroelectricity and relatively low electricity demand in India and China, said Carlos Fernandez Alvarez, senior energy analyst at the Paris-based IEA.

    Despite the drop, global coal consumption is likely to rise over the coming years, driven by demand in India, China and Southeast Asia. Power generation from coal rose almost 2% in 2018 to reach an all-time high, remaining the world’s largest source of electricity.

    The steady outlook for coal comes in spite of waning demand in industrialized nations. Europe has set a goal of zeroing out carbon pollution by the middle of the century, which would mean drastic reductions for coal. In the U.S., competition from natural gas has cut into demand for coal, despite President Donald Trump’s vows to revive the industry.

    The story is different in Asia, which will more than make up for reductions elsewhere. India, with a population of more than 1.3 billion, will see coal generation increase by 4.6% a year through 2024 to help power its growing economy. In Southeast Asia coal demand will grow more than 5% annually. China, which accounts for almost half the world’s consumption, will also have modest growth with usage peaking in 2022.


    “How we address this issue in Asia is critical for the long-term success of any global efforts to reduce emissions,” Fatih Birol, the IEA’s executive director, wrote in a foreword to the report.

    Any new coal plants added to meet the growing power demand in these countries will likely be in use for decades. Even as China’s coal consumption slows and then declines after 2022, emissions from the fuel would need to rapidly decline in order to meet climate targets.

    Under current policies, the world is set to warm almost 3 degrees Celsius (5.4 degrees Fahrenheit) by the end of the century. That’s double the rate scientists say is needed to constrain the worst impacts of climate change. To prevent those increases, it would be necessary to use technology that captures and stores carbon as it’s emitted from power plants, the IEA said. While the technology is expensive and untested at scale. But with coal here to stay, it may be the only option to reduce emissions.



    https://nationalpost.com/news/world/...ity-generation

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  • BELGRAVE
    replied
    Originally posted by Achtung Baby View Post
    Also, Australia should step up and build nuclear power plants.
    Absolutely ( We should live so long !)

    Leave a comment:


  • DingBat
    replied
    Originally posted by Achtung Baby View Post
    And in the end we follow the money...

    https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2019-...power/11814436
    Yup.

    Also, if you want a reliable weathervane for truth, look to insurance companies. Those guys are ruled by facts and probabilities. Emotions, patriotism, wishful thinking: Bah! If the math don't work, they don't insure. Anyway, in Canada, they're starting to make noises about ceasing to insure houses in "at risk areas", meaning flood plains.

    How anyone can be bullish on coal in the face of future climate change remediation action is beyond me.

    Leave a comment:

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