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Quiz: What Are the Most Common Elements in Earth's Crust?

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  • Quiz: What Are the Most Common Elements in Earth's Crust?

    What Are the Most Common Elements in Earth's Crust?

    If you're currently sitting on one of the major continents, Earth's crust extends about 20 to 30 miles below your feet. That sounds thick, but the entirety of the crust composes just one percent of Earth's volume! Still, until we mount any nonfiction expeditions to the center of the Earth, the crust is all we'll ever know firsthand. Do you know the eight major elements that compose the crust?

    You've got 3 minutes to name all 8. Go!

    http://www.realclearscience.com/arti...ths_crust.html

    It took me 51 seconds to type in all 8...
    Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

  • #2
    So, I'm not a geologist or a petroleum engineer...

    I got three...iron silica sodium. Apparently dirt, sand, salt water, asphalt and concrete were not acceptable answers...
    ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
    IN MARE IN COELO

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jose50 View Post
      I got three...iron silica sodium. Apparently dirt, sand, salt water, asphalt and concrete were not acceptable answers...
      OSAICSPM... Earth Science 201, Physical Geology, Fall Semester 1976...

      Silica, Dirt, sand, salt water, asphalt and concrete aren't elements.
      Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

      Comment


      • #4
        I got 7 (missed Magnesium) but it gave me zero.
        Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

        Comment


        • #5
          Not too shabby for off the cuff

          Got 6 of 8 missed potassium and calcium

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
            Got 6 of 8 missed potassium and calcium
            Earth wouldn't have much of a crust without feldspar...

            Why is feldspar important?

            The feldspars are a family of silicate minerals which occur in igneous rocks. There are many different members to the feldspar group. Obviously, silicon and oxygen form the foundation for the group, but calcium, sodium, and potassium are also present. One of these elements is usually dominant, but most of the feldspars contain all 3 in varying amounts. It is the proportions of these 3 elements which help determine which specific feldspar is formed. The feldspars are divided into 2 broad categories: plagioclase, which contains calcium and sodium; and orthoclase, which contains potassium. The plagioclase feldspars represent the "continuous branch" of Bowen's Reaction Series, and form a complete series between anorthite (the pure calcium member), and albite (the sodium-rich variety).

            I once saw an estimate that said that 60% of the earth's crust is composed of feldspar. This is quite a number, and since feldspar is nearly always present in igneous rocks, most classification schemes depend on the amount and kind of feldspar. In general terms, mafic and intermediate rocks contain plagioclase, with the more calcium present, the more mafic the resulting rock. Orthoclase occurs only in the felsic igneous rocks.

            [...]

            http://jersey.uoregon.edu/~mstrick/A...oQuerry34.html
            Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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            • #7
              I missed a couple, so ...
              Crust (geology)

              ...
              The crust of the Earth is composed of a great variety of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The crust is underlain by the mantle. The upper part of the mantle is composed mostly of peridotite, a rock denser than rocks common in the overlying crust. The boundary between the crust and mantle is conventionally placed at the Mohorovičić discontinuity, a boundary defined by a contrast in seismic velocity. The crust occupies less than 1% of Earth's volume.[1]
              The oceanic crust of the sheet is different from its continental crust.
              • The oceanic crust is 5 km (3 mi) to 10 km (6 mi) thick[2] and is composed primarily of basalt, diabase, and gabbro.
              • The continental crust is typically from 30 km (20 mi) to 50 km (30 mi) thick and is mostly composed of slightly less dense rocks than those of the oceanic crust. Some of these less dense rocks, such as granite, are common in the continental crust but rare to absent in the oceanic crust.

              Both the continental and oceanic crust "float" on the mantle. Because the continental crust is thicker, it extends both to greater elevations and greater depth than the oceanic crust. The slightly lower density of felsic continental rock compared to basaltic oceanic rock contributes to the higher relative elevation of the top of the continental crust. As the top of the continental crust reaches elevations higher than that of the oceanic, water runs off the continents and collects above the oceanic crust. Because of the change in velocity of seismic waves it is believed that beneath continents at a certain depth continental crust (sial) becomes close in its physical properties to oceanic crust (sima), and the transition zone is referred to as the Conrad discontinuity.
              ...




              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crust_%28geology%29
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
              “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
              Present Current Events are the Future's History

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
                Earth wouldn't have much of a crust without feldspar...

                Why is feldspar important?

                The feldspars are a family of silicate minerals which occur in igneous rocks. There are many different members to the feldspar group. Obviously, silicon and oxygen form the foundation for the group, but calcium, sodium, and potassium are also present. One of these elements is usually dominant, but most of the feldspars contain all 3 in varying amounts. It is the proportions of these 3 elements which help determine which specific feldspar is formed. The feldspars are divided into 2 broad categories: plagioclase, which contains calcium and sodium; and orthoclase, which contains potassium. The plagioclase feldspars represent the "continuous branch" of Bowen's Reaction Series, and form a complete series between anorthite (the pure calcium member), and albite (the sodium-rich variety).

                I once saw an estimate that said that 60% of the earth's crust is composed of feldspar. This is quite a number, and since feldspar is nearly always present in igneous rocks, most classification schemes depend on the amount and kind of feldspar. In general terms, mafic and intermediate rocks contain plagioclase, with the more calcium present, the more mafic the resulting rock. Orthoclase occurs only in the felsic igneous rocks.

                [...]

                http://jersey.uoregon.edu/~mstrick/A...oQuerry34.html


                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post



                  Like biology, it's a "wordy" science.

                  Max Tegmark's flowchart from The Mathematical Universe...



                  The sciences at the top are highly mathematical and minimally wordy. The disciplines at the bottom are minimally mathematical and highly wordy.

                  Physics and chemistry are primary sciences. Biological, Earth, Atmospheric and Marine sciences are secondary sciences, resulting from physical and chemical processes in the natural world.
                  Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Simplified:



                    Of course, the burning question is where do the sciences of:

                    Parapsychology, astrology, and scientology fit in that structure? Enquiring minds want to know!

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                    • #11
                      Money is the element missing from both of the flowcharts. The test wasn't loading for me.
                      One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                      "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                      Wu Cheng'en Monkey

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                      • #12
                        Looks to fit here for now ...
                        The south is SINKING: Giant chunks of the Earth's mantle are falling off and causing quakes across the southeastern US - and more are coming, warn researchers

                        Area hit by a series of strange unexplained quakes

                        Most recent was 2011 magnitude-5.8 earthquake near Mineral, Virginia

                        Area should be seismically quiet as it is in middle of Earth's tectonic plate

                        By Mark Prigg For Dailymail.com
                        Published: 13:23 EST, 4 May 2016 | Updated: 19:44 EST, 4 May 2016

                        The southeastern United States has been hit by a series of strange unexplained quakes - most recently, the 2011 magnitude-5.8 earthquake near Mineral, Virginia that shook the nation's capital.
                        Researchers have been baffled, believing the areas should be relatively quiet in terms of seismic activity, as it is located in the interior of the North American Plate, far away from plate boundaries where earthquakes usually occur.
                        Now, they believe the quakes could be caused by pieces of the Earth's mantle breaking off and sinking into the planet.
                        ...
                        http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...searchers.html
                        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                        “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                        Present Current Events are the Future's History

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Rocks...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                            Simplified:



                            Of course, the burning question is where do the sciences of:

                            Parapsychology, astrology, and scientology fit in that structure? Enquiring minds want to know!
                            Right under "Climatology" and just below "Alchemy".

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                              Right under "Climatology" and just below "Alchemy".
                              Ah! Thanks for clearing that up.

                              And you too can get a degree in it...

                              Alchemy:

                              http://alchemystudy.com/faculty-staff.htm

                              Astrology (a Master's no less!)

                              http://www.noeltyl.com/masters.html

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