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  • #16
    Fifty years ago yesterday, the Apollo one fire, where three US astronauts lost their lives in a training exercise.





    Last edited by lakechampainer; 28 Jan 17, 08:04.

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    • #17
      30 second clip on the Apollo 11 astronauts going into isolation. I didn't necessarily expect to find much on you tube about it, but I was surprised that I could find nothing of substance in words. Makes me almost think that they didn't want the Soviets to know exactly what they were doing, out of fear the Soviets might infer something about US biological or counterbiological weapons programs.

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      • #18
        Interesting video of about 17 minutes from 1961 about the X-15 program.

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        • #19

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          • #20

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            • #21

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              • #22
                I found this link from "Dr. Zebra" very interesting. It gives the medical events experienced by astronauts and cosmonauts in space, and before and after.

                http://www.doctorzebra.com/drz/s_medhx.html


                I was surprised by several things in general: that the astronauts at least were almost all smokers in the beginning, that many of them had some medical issues in general, and that there were several close calls in space, including the return from the joint Soviet-US mission.

                One thing about the astronauts and there physicals is that at 35 and 40 people are bound to not be as healthy as they were at 22 or 23 (when for example potential jet pilots would be screened). I remember reading Michael Collin's book, where he talked about how most healthy people in general will have a test result out of the ordinary- this actually makes sense when you think about is, as if for example there are 25 measurements, and the "normal" range on each one should include 95 % of the healthy population, the averages would lead to some false signals. If the parameters are too forgiving/easy, why bother screening?

                I think the Soviets, at least initially, selected younger men - and women - to go into space.

                This link is to the home page of the Dr. Zebra site.

                http://www.doctorzebra.com/drz/space.html

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                • #23
                  Apollo 12 Mission report - about 28 minutes.

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                  • #24
                    Great thread,though I haven't had time to watch all the vids yer.I hope you keep up the good work.
                    Wack tac mac hey.
                    Regards.
                    Grishnak.

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                    • #25
                      Link to Wikipedia article regarding whether Surveyor 3 camera had bacteria from earth which survived in a dormant state on the moon for 2 1/2 years.

                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Report...is_on_the_Moon

                      excerpt

                      As part of the Apollo 12 mission, the camera from the Surveyor 3 probe was brought back from the Moon to Earth. On analyzing the camera it was found that the common bacterium Streptococcus mitis was alive on the camera. This was attributed by NASA to the camera not being sterilized on Earth prior to its launch two and a half years previously.[citation needed]

                      link to Astrobiology magazine

                      https://web.archive.org/web/20060831...ticle1311.html

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                      • #26
                        The date, July 20, 1969, will forever be known as the day the United States of America put the first man on the moon. What most people do not know is the date also marks when Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin celebrated the first and only Lord’s Supper on the moon, a fact the U.S. government refused to make public at the time.
                        Inside the lunar module, just hours before stepping onto the moon for the first time, Aldrin radioed Houston Space Center Mission Control. He asked for a few moments of silence “to invite each person listening in, wherever and whomever they may be, to pause for a moment and contemplate the events of the past few hours, and to give thanks in his or her own way.”

                        In that moment of silence that followed, Aldrin silently read a passage from the book of John that he had written out on a 3×5 card: “I am the vine, you are the branches. Whoever remains in me, and I in him, will bear much fruit; for you can do nothing without me.” Then he took out the miniature chalice and bread and wine from his personal allowance pouch. “I poured the wine into the chalice our church had given me,” he told Guideposts magazine in 1970. “In the one-sixth gravity of the moon the wine curled slowly and gracefully up the side of the cup. It was interesting to think that the very first liquid ever poured on the moon, and the first food eaten there, were communion elements.” Neil Armstrong, the other astronaut onboard, did not participate.
                        But that was not Aldrin’s original plan—he had wanted to celebrate communion on the air with the rest of his comments, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was not happy about it. Just months earlier, the Apollo 8 astronauts broadcast parts of the Biblical creation narrative from the book of Genesis while orbiting the moon on Christmas Eve: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.” Atheist Madalyn Murray O’Hair sued, arguing that the astronauts were government employees and therefore their actions violated the separation of church and state. The Supreme Court dismissed the case—for lack of jurisdiction—but it created enough of a stir that NASA wanted to avoid any such distractions from their missions. When Aldrin, a devout Presbyterian, told NASA flight operations coordinator Deke Slayton of his plan to celebrate communion during the live broadcast, Slayton told him to stand down. “No, that’s not a good idea, Buzz,” Slayton told him, according to Adrin’s memoir Magnificent Desolation. “Go ahead and have communion, but keep your comments more general.”

                        Aldrin later questioned his own decision to celebrate the Christian practice. “Perhaps if I had it to do over again, I would not choose to celebrate communion,” he wrote in his memoir. “Although it was a deeply meaningful experience for me, it was a Christian sacrament, and we had come to the moon in the name of all mankind—be they Christians, Jews, Muslims, animists, agnostics, or atheists. But at the time I could think of no better way to acknowledge the enormity of the Apollo 11 experience than by giving thanks to God.”
                        Webster Presbyterian Church—Aldrin’s church in Houston that supplied him with the bread and the wine for the unique occasion—still celebrates the lunar communion every year on the Sunday closest to July 20.


                        http://swampland.time.com/2013/07/20...r-anniversary/

                        Credo quia absurdum.


                        Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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                        • #27
                          So much for the fools who think we didn't land on the moon, or at least for some reason pretend we didn't land on the moon.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
                            The date, July 20, 1969, will forever be known as the day the United States of America put the first man on the moon. What most people do not know is the date also marks when Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin celebrated the first and only Lord’s Supper on the moon, a fact the U.S. government refused to make public at the time.
                            Inside the lunar module, just hours before stepping onto the moon for the first time, Aldrin radioed Houston Space Center Mission Control. He asked for a few moments of silence “to invite each person listening in, wherever and whomever they may be, to pause for a moment and contemplate the events of the past few hours, and to give thanks in his or her own way.”

                            In that moment of silence that followed, Aldrin silently read a passage from the book of John that he had written out on a 3×5 card: “I am the vine, you are the branches. Whoever remains in me, and I in him, will bear much fruit; for you can do nothing without me.” Then he took out the miniature chalice and bread and wine from his personal allowance pouch. “I poured the wine into the chalice our church had given me,” he told Guideposts magazine in 1970. “In the one-sixth gravity of the moon the wine curled slowly and gracefully up the side of the cup. It was interesting to think that the very first liquid ever poured on the moon, and the first food eaten there, were communion elements.” Neil Armstrong, the other astronaut onboard, did not participate.
                            But that was not Aldrin’s original plan—he had wanted to celebrate communion on the air with the rest of his comments, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was not happy about it. Just months earlier, the Apollo 8 astronauts broadcast parts of the Biblical creation narrative from the book of Genesis while orbiting the moon on Christmas Eve: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.” Atheist Madalyn Murray O’Hair sued, arguing that the astronauts were government employees and therefore their actions violated the separation of church and state. The Supreme Court dismissed the case—for lack of jurisdiction—but it created enough of a stir that NASA wanted to avoid any such distractions from their missions. When Aldrin, a devout Presbyterian, told NASA flight operations coordinator Deke Slayton of his plan to celebrate communion during the live broadcast, Slayton told him to stand down. “No, that’s not a good idea, Buzz,” Slayton told him, according to Adrin’s memoir Magnificent Desolation. “Go ahead and have communion, but keep your comments more general.”

                            Aldrin later questioned his own decision to celebrate the Christian practice. “Perhaps if I had it to do over again, I would not choose to celebrate communion,” he wrote in his memoir. “Although it was a deeply meaningful experience for me, it was a Christian sacrament, and we had come to the moon in the name of all mankind—be they Christians, Jews, Muslims, animists, agnostics, or atheists. But at the time I could think of no better way to acknowledge the enormity of the Apollo 11 experience than by giving thanks to God.”
                            Webster Presbyterian Church—Aldrin’s church in Houston that supplied him with the bread and the wine for the unique occasion—still celebrates the lunar communion every year on the Sunday closest to July 20.


                            http://swampland.time.com/2013/07/20...r-anniversary/

                            Wack tac mac hey.
                            Regards.
                            Grishnak.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Interesting. Although one could equally well as ask why did California not put a man on the moon.

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