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  • Earth is not the Metric ...

    Earth is not the Metric ... for gauging other worlds for life, especially advanced sentient forms with (inter-stellar) technology (potential) ...

    For a couple of factors. One might be minor, but the other would seem major ....

    The Minor ...

    Our Galaxy is a spiral shaped one and our Star-Planet System revolves about the center of the Galaxy/"Milky Way" at about 3/5 or 60 % from it's center, on what some call the Fringe/Frontier * . Odd thing is that the orbital plane or ecleptic of our star is perpendicular to that of the Galaxy. Which is why we see the band of the Milky Way run North~South rather than on the Horizon. The effect this has on astronomy~cosmology~assorted philosphies could be subject for debate (part of a reason for this thread) but with a Star/Planet System already at "odds" ~ 'Perpendicular' to the Normal Flow of the Galaxy, who's to say what other "energies"/"matrixes" are affected ...

    The Major ...

    Has to do with our Moon. No other planet in this System has a number of satellites/moons with mass and energy that total out against the parent planet in ration like that of "the Earth" versus "the Moon". Earth, via Luna/Moon/Kingu experiences a tidal effect not even closely matched by any other planet in this System. That "Tidal Effect" also throws an interesting tweak into the biology on this planet, something likely not experienced on most other worlds with life and Sentientence elsewhere in this Galaxy. Earth trends towards the unique and exceptional, so many aspects and variations of life we find on this world/planet likely don't exist on most others.

    I'm guessing that if I could package, present(market), and cost effectively ship, say geoducks**, to Tau Ceti or Epsilon Eridani, etc. , I might make a better profit margin with the 1/10th of the 1% Wealthy and Elite on those worlds with this exotic gourmet delicacy than I could anywhere here on this third rock from a star ...

    Look between the lines ...

    * Assuming oldest stars/planet systems trend towards the center of the Galaxy, as one moves outward you are engaging the frontier(fringe) of younger Star~Planet Systems. Hence Sol/Earth is young compared to Stars/Systems towards the center of the Milky Way Galaxy.

    ** Geoducks - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoduck
    Last edited by G David Bock; 20 May 15, 23:54. Reason: spellin' and grammar

  • #2
    Another factor - Plate Tectonics.

    Plate Tectonics could be the result of how we acquired the Moon. Best theory being one involving impact and since the continetal crush appears to be the older and likely original crust, but covers less than half the planet, would seem much of the original layer got knocked off~away in the impact that could have formed the Moon, or placed it in it's orbit.

    The other "rocky planets", including the Moon, don't show evidence of plate tectonics so would seem we are looking at a rather unique and likely uncommon condition here.

    Comment


    • #3
      ^ One result of those plate tectonics is the "gaps" between them and what they result in ...
      The 40,000-Mile Volcano
      EXCERPT:
      ...The cause, she proposed, is Earthís slightly elliptical orbit around the sun. That changes the strength of the sunís gravitational pull on Earth during the year and, as a result, the magnitude of the tides that squeeze the planet. She said the eruptions coincided with the annual letup of the squeeze. More boldly, Dr. Tolstoy suggested that such mechanisms might help explain how the planetís regular ice ages end so abruptly ó long a mystery.
      Ocean levels fall sharply in such bitterly cold periods as water is tied up in massive continental ice sheets. In a paper, she proposed that the reduced pressure on the ridges might let them erupt far more frequently. As a result, more carbon dioxide would spew into the ocean and, eventually, into the atmosphere, trapping more heat and warming the planet.
      In short, according to this hypothesis, the ice sheets would eventually grow large enough to initiate their own destruction, refilling the oceans. It was a radical idea that has stirred debate.
      ....
      http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/12/sc...ater.html?_r=0

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      • #4
        Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
        Earth is not the Metric ... for gauging other worlds for life, especially advanced sentient forms with (inter-stellar) technology (potential) ...

        For a couple of factors. One might be minor, but the other would seem major ....

        The Minor ...

        Our Galaxy is a spiral shaped one and our Star-Planet System revolves about the center of the Galaxy/"Milky Way" at about 3/5 or 60 % from it's center, on what some call the Fringe/Frontier * . Odd thing is that the orbital plane or ecleptic of our star is perpendicular to that of the Galaxy. Which is why we see the band of the Milky Way run North~South rather than on the Horizon. The effect this has on astronomy~cosmology~assorted philosphies could be subject for debate (part of a reason for this thread) but with a Star/Planet System already at "odds" ~ 'Perpendicular' to the Normal Flow of the Galaxy, who's to say what other "energies"/"matrixes" are affected ...

        The Major ...

        Has to do with our Moon. No other planet in this System has a number of satellites/moons with mass and energy that total out against the parent planet in ration like that of "the Earth" versus "the Moon". Earth, via Luna/Moon/Kingu experiences a tidal effect not even closely matched by any other planet in this System. That "Tidal Effect" also throws an interesting tweak into the biology on this planet, something likely not experienced on most other worlds with life and Sentientence elsewhere in this Galaxy. Earth trends towards the unique and exceptional, so many aspects and variations of life we find on this world/planet likely don't exist on most others.

        I'm guessing that if I could package, present(market), and cost effectively ship, say geoducks**, to Tau Ceti or Epsilon Eridani, etc. , I might make a better profit margin with the 1/10th of the 1% Wealthy and Elite on those worlds with this exotic gourmet delicacy than I could anywhere here on this third rock from a star ...

        Look between the lines ...

        * Assuming oldest stars/planet systems trend towards the center of the Galaxy, as one moves outward you are engaging the frontier(fringe) of younger Star~Planet Systems. Hence Sol/Earth is young compared to Stars/Systems towards the center of the Milky Way Galaxy.

        ** Geoducks - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoduck
        It's possible that without the moon Earth would have been a second Venus with an over thick atmosphere and too high a temperature for life to have evolved. We may need to look at binary worlds like ours.
        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MarkV View Post
          It's possible that without the moon Earth would have been a second Venus with an over thick atmosphere and too high a temperature for life to have evolved. We may need to look at binary worlds like ours.
          Since Venus rotates counter to Solar angular momentum, the implication is some high energy event that "flipped it's poles" and dumped the energy converted to heat into the surface and atmosphere. I suspect either a major impact event or a close passage. If not for that Venus might have been similar to Earth, but with less variety of lifeforms, and less volcanic and "venusquake" activity.

          Spending the week here on the Oregon coast with wife's mother and sisters (a Holidaze gift of sorts) and watching the waves roll and crash in (most are several feet high) am reminded of the effect of the Moon in forms of tides, "extra" wave actions, and tidal based aquatic life, such as all the clam vent holes spotted on the sandy beaches.

          My main point of this thread is the volcanic and plate tectonic activity, mostly derived from a probable past impact event - combined - with the very huge tidal effects of a satellite with exceptional size and mass compared to it's "parent" world/planet. I suspect this is a pair of factors rather uncommon among life-supporting worlds in the universe.

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          • #6
            It's like a graph with only one point plotted on it. Very hard to draw firm conclusions from so little data.
            Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by GCoyote View Post
              It's like a graph with only one point plotted on it. Very hard to draw firm conclusions from so little data.
              And yet it happens here all the time.
              Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

              Comment


              • #8
                Violent Impact That Created Moon Mixed Lunar and Earth Rocks

                EXCERPT:
                The colossal impact that created the moon may have spawned the cosmic mashup between the rocks that ultimately became Earth and its lunar neighbor, researchers say.
                Previous research suggested that about 100 million years after the solar system formed 4.6 billion years ago, the newborn Earth was hit by a Mars-size rock named Theia, named after the mother of the moon in Greek myth. Debris from the collision later coalesced into the moon.
                Much remains uncertain about the precise nature of this giant impact. For instance, scientists have long debated how much debris, including water, was exchanged between the nascent Earth and moon, and whether the collision was a glancing blow or a high-energy impact. [Watch: How the Moon Was Made, and What It Did for Life]
                Now scientists find evidence that the rocks that went on to become Earth and the moon were thoroughly mixed together before they separated. This suggests that "the collision that formed the moon was a high-energy impact," said study lead author Edward Young, a cosmochemist and geochemist at the University of California, Los Angeles.
                ...
                http://www.space.com/31763-moon-crea...rth-rocks.html

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                • #9
                  Of course Earth shouldn't be the metric to judge what other intelligent life there might be in the universe, given the paucity of here...

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                  • #10
                    The dolphins object!
                    Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
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                    The best place in the world to "work".

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                    • #11
                      Maybe the dolphins and the whales are alien life forms...
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                      • #12
                        If we can't compare with the Earth (which may not be a great datum, but at least is well-enough known to give us somewhere to start), what's the alternative ?
                        Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                          Maybe the dolphins and the whales are alien life forms...
                          I thought it was the mice who had the planet built as it is?
                          "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by the ace View Post
                            If we can't compare with the Earth (which may not be a great datum, but at least is well-enough known to give us somewhere to start), what's the alternative ?
                            We shouldn't try yet. The Error of Small Samples is a classic and shouldn't be ignored. We can say that things MIGHT be good for life in one system, but we can't say things ARE good for life in that system.
                            Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
                            Hyperwar, Whats New
                            World War II Resources
                            The best place in the world to "work".

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
                              We shouldn't try yet. The Error of Small Samples is a classic and shouldn't be ignored. We can say that things MIGHT be good for life in one system, but we can't say things ARE good for life in that system.
                              The approach I'd take.

                              Obviously, with only one known world, we can't talk in absolutes, but while the data we have are skewed, it'd be foolish to dismiss them completely.
                              Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

                              Comment

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