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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
    Proxima Centauri's Origins Could Mean Its Exoplanet Really Is Habitable
    After decades of uncertainty, it seems that astronomers may have found the strongest evidence yet that Proxima Centauri is indeed "gravitationally bound" to Alpha Centauri. This is interesting for many reasons, primarily because now we're pretty sure the Alpha Centauri system is a triple-star system, with two stars (Alpha Centauri A and B) orbiting closely and one oddball sibling (Proxima Centauri) with an extremely wide orbit.

    But with the recent discovery of a small rocky exoplanet in orbit around Proxima, this new finding will boost hopes that this little world may be habitable for life as we know it.

    Proxima Centauri is located around 4.25 light-years away making it the nearest star to Earth beyond our sun. The star's planet, called Proxima b, is approximately the same mass as Earth and orbits within the star's "habitable zone" — the region surrounding a star that's neither too hot or too cold for liquid water to exist on a planetary surface. Finding any planet within a star's habitable zone — regardless of the star's size or luminosity — will always be exciting as, if there is liquid water there, life could be possible. And discovering a (potentially) habitable world on our galactic doorstep is an incredible stroke of luck.
    ...
    http://www.space.com/35150-proxima-c...astronomy.html
    Could Proxima B Host Alien Life?
    A Giant Flare May Have Wiped It Out Last Year
    ...
    The chances of finding life beyond our solar system faced a dramatic new calculation as of March 24, 2017, thanks to a gigantic outburst from one of the stars nearest to us. According to a new paper due to be published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, the area around Proxima Centauri—which scientists believe could be a solar system—is looking a lot less appealing than it did before that date.

    Proxima Centauri let loose a flare that sent charged particles flying toward any planet in its orbit. Although it lasted just 10 seconds, it made the star appear about 1,000 times brighter than usual and was about 10 times brighter than the most impressive flares from our sun that scientists have studied. The paper suggests those kinds of outbursts could be common—and deadly.
    ...
    http://www.newsweek.com/could-proxim...t-flare-819934

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Humans Will Hear from Intelligent Aliens This Century, Physicist Says

    Humans Will Hear from Intelligent Aliens This Century, Physicist Say
    ...
    Humans will make contact with aliens by the end of the century, theoretical physicist and futurist Michio Kaku told Redditers last week. However, Kaku said he wasn't sure whether we'd be able to communicate directly with this unknown extraterrestrial society — one that could run the gamut from hostile to pacifist, according to Kaku.

    In his AMA on Reddit, Kaku responded to a question about alien civilizations, saying, "Let me stick my neck out. I personally feel that within this century, we will make contact with an alien civilization, by listening in on their radio communications. But talking to them will be difficult, since they could be tens of light years away. So, in the meantime, we must decipher their language to understand their level of technology. Are they Type I, II, or III??? [These represent three categories in the Kardashev scale, measuring technological achievement in civilizations based on their level of energy use for communication.] And what are their intentions. Are they expansive and aggressive, or peaceful."
    ...
    https://www.space.com/39817-intellig...ku-reddit.html

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Interestingly, we keep finding more life here than we knew about;

    Found: An Electric Blue Tarantula and More Than 30 Other New Species

    A rich month of species-finding in the Guyana rain forest.

    by Vittoria Traverso November 27, 2017
    https://www.atlasobscura.com/article...ana-rainforest

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Being the more generic astronomy thread;
    Multiverse: have astronomers found evidence of parallel universes?
    https://www.theguardian.com/science/...llel-universes

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Very interesting discover concerning a dwarf star and very close orbiting planets;
    The Harmony That Keeps Trappist-1’s 7 Earth-size Worlds From Colliding

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/10/s...usic.html?_r=0


    Math as music

    Leave a comment:


  • Bwaha
    replied
    Cassini Sees Heat Below the Icy Surface of Enceladus

    A new study in the journal Nature Astronomy reports that the south polar region of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus is warmer than expected just a few feet below its icy surface. This suggests that Enceladus' ocean of liquid water might be only a couple of miles beneath this region -- closer to the surface than previously thought.
    The excess heat is especially pronounced over three fractures that are not unlike the "tiger stripes" -- prominent, actively venting fractures that slice across the pole -- except that they don't appear to be active at the moment. Seemingly dormant fractures lying above the moon's warm, underground sea point to the dynamic character of Enceladus' geology, suggesting the moon might have experienced several episodes of activity, in different places on its surface.
    The finding agrees with the results of a 2016 study by a team independent of the Cassini mission that estimated the thickness of Enceladus' icy crust. The studies indicate an average depth for the ice shell of 11 to 14 miles (18 to 22 kilometers), with a thickness of less than 3 miles (5 kilometers) at the south pole.
    "Finding temperatures near these three inactive fractures that are unexpectedly higher than those outside them adds to the intrigue of Enceladus," said Cassini Project Scientist Linda Spilker at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. "What is the warm underground ocean really like and could life have evolved there? These questions remain to be answered by future missions to this ocean world."
    More information about this study is available from ESA, the European Space Agency, at:
    http://sci.esa.int/cassini-huygens/5...nder-the-frost


    https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6775



    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    How Did Life Begin? Dividing Droplets Could Hold the Answer
    https://www.wired.com/2017/01/life-b...s-hold-answer/

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Does the mysterious WOLF 1061c hold life? Astronomers say nearby exoplanet lies within the 'habitable zone'

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...hold-life.html

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Why Most Planets Will Either Be Lush or Dead

    The Gaia hypothesis implies that once alien life takes hold, it will flourish.

    http://nautil.us/issue/44/luck/why-m...e-lush-or-dead

    Leave a comment:


  • Moulin
    replied
    Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
    If you are directing this toward me, I endorse most of evolutionary theory, but remain open to the concept of Intervention providing an assist upon occassion. For more details see this thread I've provided on the subject;
    http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=152502
    all replies

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Originally posted by Moulin View Post
    if you do not believe in evolution, what is your theory on how man 'came into the world' ?
    not how did the universe begin, how did man ''begin''?
    I would like to know the specifics
    did a fully formed man just 'appear'/etc ?
    thanks any replies
    If you are directing this toward me, I endorse most of evolutionary theory, but remain open to the concept of Intervention providing an assist upon occassion. For more details see this thread I've provided on the subject;
    http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=152502

    Leave a comment:


  • Moulin
    replied
    if you do not believe in evolution, what is your theory on how man 'came into the world' ?
    not how did the universe begin, how did man ''begin''?
    I would like to know the specifics
    did a fully formed man just 'appear'/etc ?
    thanks any replies

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Proxima Centauri's Origins Could Mean Its Exoplanet Really Is Habitable
    After decades of uncertainty, it seems that astronomers may have found the strongest evidence yet that Proxima Centauri is indeed "gravitationally bound" to Alpha Centauri. This is interesting for many reasons, primarily because now we're pretty sure the Alpha Centauri system is a triple-star system, with two stars (Alpha Centauri A and B) orbiting closely and one oddball sibling (Proxima Centauri) with an extremely wide orbit.

    But with the recent discovery of a small rocky exoplanet in orbit around Proxima, this new finding will boost hopes that this little world may be habitable for life as we know it.

    Proxima Centauri is located around 4.25 light-years away making it the nearest star to Earth beyond our sun. The star's planet, called Proxima b, is approximately the same mass as Earth and orbits within the star's "habitable zone" — the region surrounding a star that's neither too hot or too cold for liquid water to exist on a planetary surface. Finding any planet within a star's habitable zone — regardless of the star's size or luminosity — will always be exciting as, if there is liquid water there, life could be possible. And discovering a (potentially) habitable world on our galactic doorstep is an incredible stroke of luck.
    ...
    http://www.space.com/35150-proxima-c...astronomy.html

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Until I find another place, seems there's hints of another potential "megastructure" out there, so for ref.;
    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...ture&FORM=VDRE

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by MarkV View Post
    Ah I see - we were put there by intelligent design perhaps?
    It's known as the Botany Bay Theory, and it holds as much water as most other theories of origin, and it certainly outshines Creationism while lending a touch of credence to Intelligent Design.

    It also does something no other theory even attempts to address, and that is our total failure to evolve past our primal level of violence. If you have any actual experience inside prisons observing populations chosen specifically for exclusion from the rest of society, you know how close the comparison is.

    However, before you get into a self-imposed snit, it's merely a theory that I happen to believe in since it fulfills the requirements of Occam's Razor far better than any other theory to date, and goes a long way to explaining a number of other phenomena in the process.

    Don't tell me you still believe in an invisible Super Supreme Alien Entity who loves us but won't put a halt to the constant slaughter, depravity, starvation, disease and genocide? How likely is that in the real universe?

    Leave a comment:

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