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Astrobiology ~ Exobiology; Life Beyond Earth ...

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
    I still regard our planet as a quarantine world for violent undesirables. As such, intelligent space-faring species would not have anything to do with us with excellent reasons for avoiding all contact. There is, to my way of thinking, a perfectly rational reason why we are located in such a remote part of our galaxy, nearly at the Galactic Rim.

    .
    Ah I see - we were put there by intelligent design perhaps?

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  • Mountain Man
    replied
    I still regard our planet as a quarantine world for violent undesirables. As such, intelligent space-faring species would not have anything to do with us with excellent reasons for avoiding all contact. There is, to my way of thinking, a perfectly rational reason why we are located in such a remote part of our galaxy, nearly at the Galactic Rim.

    Some visitation for the purposes of observation, especially during wars, would be logical. It's what we would do, and we would also observe from time to time to see how the "ant colony" was getting along.

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  • MarkV
    replied
    More info
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-37167390

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Nivens Wunderland
    http://news.larryniven.net/concordan...rlandJHsml.jpg

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Life imitating art!. Long before this planet was postulated - indeed when it was believed to be impossible, SF author Larry Niven placed such a planet in his "Known Space" series - it was called Wunderland (pronounced in the German fashion) and Earth's first interstellar colony.

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    This could go a couple other threads, but here for now;
    Could Proxima Centauri Be Our Interstellar Getaway?
    ...
    Well, rumor has it that there's a possible "Earth 2.0" orbiting Proxima Centauri, a red dwarf star that's right on our cosmic doorstep. Located only 4.25 light-years away, Proxima is believed to be gravitationally bound to the binary star system Alpha Centauri, a system that has also undergone much scrutiny for its exoplanet potential.

    To have an exoplanet with any Earth-like qualities so close to the solar system would be an incredible stroke of luck, considering that the most Earth-like exoplanet discovered so far is Kepler-452b, which was announced last year to much fanfare. The kicker is that this alien world is 1,400 light-years away. Barring any huge science fiction-esque strides in interstellar propulsion, it's highly unlikely that such a distant world will get a whiff of humanity any time soon.

    But a hypothetical planet orbiting a star only 4.25 light-years away? That doesn't sound so bad.

    What's more, if (and that's a big IF) there is an exoplanet with a few Earth-like qualities orbiting Proxima Centauri, its existence could transform the way we look at the stars. We might start to see interstellar space as a challenge we can aspire to physically explore rather than the impenetrable void it currently is.
    ...
    http://www.space.com/33780-could-pro...r-getaway.html

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by grishnak View Post
    Ether that or the survivors have a policy of non communication for safety reasons.Looking within our own past an understandable policy.
    Or they have detected us but decided that we are far too primitive to be worth the cost of contacting when other more advanced civilisations exist, or possibly they are using methods of communication that our technology has not yet advanced far enough to detect.

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  • Bwaha
    replied
    Originally posted by Pirate-Drakk View Post
    Look forward to seeing these on a planet near you...






    Look under the Physiology section:
    Outer space – tardigrades are the first known animal to survive in space.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tardigrade
    Beat me to it...

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  • Bwaha
    replied
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tardigrade

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  • GCoyote
    replied
    Maybe Life in the Cosmos Is Rare After All

    Interesting short article. I take issue with the final paragraph since either biological or geological processes could easily have consumed or destroyed any evidence of other instances of the genesis of life.

    Today the pendulum has swung decisively the other way. Many distinguished scientists proclaim that the universe is teeming with life, at least some of it intelligent. The biologist Christian de Duve went so far as to call life “a cosmic imperative.” Yet the science has hardly changed. We are almost as much in the dark today about the pathway from non-life to life as Darwin was when he wrote, “It is mere rubbish thinking at present of the origin of life; one might as well think of the origin of matter.”
    http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/...are-after-all/

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    One method of getting there ...
    How does NASA's EmDrive actually work ?

    http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com...-actually-work

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    The Oldest Ages of the Earth Keep Getting Older

    EXCERPT:
    Of the many questions that vex humanity, there is one above all others. It’s a question we’ve been asking ourselves since we realised we could ask ourselves questions. There are a lot of people who think they know the answer, even though there are almost more answers than there are people. Even so, we officially don’t know which of those many answers is the truth.

    The question is; where did life come from?

    If we gloss over the various theological discussions such a question evokes – if only because we haven’t got that kind of time – we still end up with an encyclopedia volume’s worth of theories, hypotheses, suppositions, and crackpot ideas. Primordial soup, panspermia and pseudo-panspermia, deep-hot-biosphere, the clay hypothesis, and several more. All of those ideas and those unlisted are encompassed under a single term: abiogenesis – which is the idea that life can spontaneously manifest out of non-living components. You might also hear the term biopoiesis tossed about in this conversation, which is just a more specific reference to the three stages of the development of life. But these fancy scientific words are such a small part of the question, it’s unfortunate so many people get hung up on them.

    It’s important to understand that none of those theories are correct though. Or, well…we still don’t know which, if any of them, is correct. The front runner in this race is the chemical evolution theory of life, which is a reformed version of the primordial soup idea. Its basic tenets have been proven in laboratory, but just because life can arise in that way, doesn’t mean it did (at least on Earth). The scientific community is still working to bring us an answer, but until we invent time travel, it’s possible we’ll never know for sure.

    Of course, what we know about how life began pales in comparison to what we know about when it began on Earth.

    Some time ago, I brought you discussion on the likelihood that life has developed elsewhere in the galaxy, and the ways in which we speculate about how much of that life might exist. You’re probably familiar with the Drake Equation, which provides a way of mathematically calculating how many times life should have sprung up in our galaxy, and how many times out of that pool such live might reach a point of intelligent civilisation. It depends on several variables, most of which we have to guess at, but current estimates claim that there should be somewhere in the neighbourhood of 10,000 alien civilizations in the Milky Way.
    ...
    However, new results published in Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences in September have thrown that bit of accepted wisdom right out the window. Geochemist at the University of California, Los Angeles, and co-author of the paper, Mark Harrison, explains that he and his team found strong evidence that life began more than 250 million years earlier than previously thought. Analysing some 10,000 zircon fragments from rocks found throughout Western Australia, Harrison found what appeared to be graphite inclusions embedded in 79 zircons (zircons are like diamonds; very hard, and can form around elements from their environment). One of those tiny flecks has been confirmed as graphite, and through radiometric dating, that particular zircon is believed to be 4.1 billion years old.[1]
    ...
    http://www.dailygrail.com/Fresh-Scie...-Getting-Older

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Discovery of habitable planet could mean alien life is 'incredibly close', say scientists

    Australian researchers have found a potentially inhabitable planet - called Wolf 1061c – which is 14 light years away, about a third closer than the nearest such planet

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/scie...cientists.html


    At a mass supposedly four times that of Earth, the gravity sounds a bit too much to be appealing.

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Alpha Centauri Earth-like Planets

    Making the closest star(s) even more a focus for first interstellar missions (once such are possible);

    Two Earth-like planets could be hiding close to our solar system - and scientists say there may be watery worlds nearby

    • Planets may be close to other habitable worlds 4.3 light years away
    • The first planet, dubbed Alpha Centauri Bb, was discovered in 2012
    • But it was quickly dismissed by scientists who said it was a false alarm
    • New analysis used Hubble data instead to find some signals from the planet, as well as a second one close by

    By Ellie Zolfagharifard For Dailymail.com
    Published: 17:04 EST, 27 March 2015 | Updated: 17:18 EST, 27 March 2015

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...ds-nearby.html

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Billions Of Planets In Our Galaxy 'May Hold Life'

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/techno...ife/ar-BBikSSy

    Leave a comment:

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