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  • #31
    Tony, another great thread to your credit.
    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

    you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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    • #32
      Can't show you any photos or videos, but I can show you how Japanese haiku poets birdwatch:

      the kingfisher;
      on its wet feathers
      shines the evening sun (Tori)

      with the evening breeze,
      the water laps against
      the heron's legs (Buson)

      It is the noon;
      orioles are crying;
      the river flows in silence (Issa)

      falcon perched on
      telephone pole, ignores
      taunting mockingbird (mine)

      And a classic from the master, Basho:

      on a withered branch,
      a crow is perched,
      in the autumn evening
      Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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      • #33
        A blogsite I found that is somewhat helpful to me. The blogger is from central Massachusetts, east of Worcester.

        http://o6cpcs.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
          Can't show you any photos or videos, but I can show you how Japanese haiku poets birdwatch:

          the kingfisher;
          on its wet feathers
          shines the evening sun (Tori)

          with the evening breeze,
          the water laps against
          the heron's legs (Buson)

          It is the noon;
          orioles are crying;
          the river flows in silence (Issa)

          falcon perched on
          telephone pole, ignores
          taunting mockingbird (mine)

          And a classic from the master, Basho:

          on a withered branch,
          a crow is perched,
          in the autumn evening
          in English Haiku seems
          pretentious nonsense
          maybe better in Japanese
          Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
          Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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          • #35
            Originally posted by MarkV View Post
            in English Haiku seems
            pretentious nonsense
            maybe better in Japanese
            Ah, vintage MarkV. You think you are in shallow water, but the currents run deeper.

            R.H. Blyth, in his multiple collections of haiku, found comparable poetry of sensation in English poetry.

            Wordsworth: Or the swan stirs the reeds, his neck and bill wetting, that drip upon the water still

            Tennyson's famous line: the moan of doves in immemorial elms

            Keats (like onomatopaeia in haiku):
            fast fading violets covered up in leaves...

            and full grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn ...

            Blyth notes, "In haiku the words are less important than the sensation...."

            My working definition for haiku is a verse about a moment in nature expressed in the length of a breath.

            Recommend you look up Blyth's works; he will hold your hand while you wade in unknown water.
            Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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            • #36
              An article I found interesting - Mitigation Measures for Highway-caused Impacts to Birds. Sandra L. Jacobson

              https://www.fws.gov/migratorybirds/p...aymeasures.pdf

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              • #37
                From Cornell University - 4 videos about 10 minutes each on the basics of bird identification


                Size and Shape
                https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/in...ng-size-shape/

                Color Pattern
                https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/in...color-pattern/

                Bird Behavior
                https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/in...ding-behavior/

                Habitat
                https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/in...rding-habitat/
                Last edited by lakechampainer; 24 Aug 16, 21:26.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
                  An article I found interesting - Mitigation Measures for Highway-caused Impacts to Birds. Sandra L. Jacobson

                  https://www.fws.gov/migratorybirds/p...aymeasures.pdf
                  A bit unconvincing in places for example one solution is "reduce road kill" doubtless a very laudable aspiration but how - its like a preacher saying we must reduce sin. Similarly "remove road kill" is equally unrealistic.

                  Last year I hit a pheasant that flew into my car at windscreen height when I was doing 60 mph. That's a big bird, I damn near lost control and a lot of expensive damage was done but I don't see anything in that article that could have mitigated it.
                  Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                  Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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                  • #39
                    A link with photos of some of the most popular backyard birds.

                    https://www.thespruce.com/most-commo...-birds-4121925
                    Last edited by lakechampainer; 20 Jul 17, 07:28.

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                    • #40
                      How to identify house sparrows. Many pictures of house sparrows and other birds, including song sparrows.

                      http://bluebirdnutcafe.yuku.com/topi...s#.WXCho4jyvIU

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                      • #41
                        A list produced in 1927 of birds to be found close to where I live has 74 species in it. Today 90 years on although some have become much rarer others that were listed as visitors only and not breeding are now relatively common and the line above which they did not breed has moved further North, The 1927 list list has no Goshawk on it and I have seen a pair within a mile of here. That squawking pest the ring necked parakeet (an introduced alien to Britain) has so far not managed to over winter successfully although I have seen the occasional one in the summer but I fear that if winters get milder on average its only a matter of time. If this happens the local vineyards are going to be very unhappy as they love grapes. Sparrow numbers here seem to fluctuate quite dramatically from year to year.
                        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Squawking seagulls circle

                          Waiting for slobs to leave food

                          In the parking lot

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                          • #43
                            Still waiting to be called back to work/for the world to return: I have enjoyed listening to bird sounds this spring in the unusual silence. I figured I might as well try to learn to ID them to some extent. When I did try to learn birding, I never did focus much on sounds. But maybe I'll give it a try.

                            Links to:

                            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird_vocalization

                            From The National Zoo: Guide to North American Bird Songs and Sounds

                            https://nationalzoo.si.edu/scbi/migr...n/nasongkey.pl


                            ===================================

                            excerpt from Wikipedia article:

                            In extratropical Eurasia and the Americas almost all song is produced by male birds; however in the tropics and to a greater extent the desert belts of Australia and Africa it is more typical for females to sing as much as males. These differences have been known for a long time[9][10] and are generally attributed to the much less regular and seasonal climate of Australian and African arid zones requiring that birds breed at any time when conditions are favourable, although they cannot breed in many years because food supply never increases above a minimal level.[9] With aseasonal irregular breeding, both sexes must be brought into breeding condition and vocalisation, especially duetting, serves this purpose. The high frequency of female vocalisations in the tropics, Australia and Southern Africa may also relate to very low mortality rates producing much stronger pair-bonding and territoriality.[11]
                            Last edited by lakechampainer; Today, 16:59.

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