Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

SpaceX's Dragon Completes First Official Cargo Run to the ISS

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • SpaceX's Dragon Completes First Official Cargo Run to the ISS

    SpaceX's Dragon Completes First Official Cargo Run to the ISS
    Tiffany Kaiser - October 29, 2012 10:35 AM
    http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=29057


    The Dragon brought home 1,673 pounds of cargo from the ISS, including scientific samples, hardware and supplies. It took about 800 pounds of supplies to the ISS earlier this month.
    ...
    SpaceX flew its Dragon capsule and Falcon 9 rocket to the ISS for the first time back in May for a test supply run. After that successful trip, SpaceX and NASA signed a $1.6 billion contract that allows SpaceX to complete 12 supply trips to the ISS and back.
    ...
    SpaceX is also looking to send the first manned Dragon capsule to the ISS somewhere between 2015 and 2017.
    The Europa Barbarorum II team [M2TW] needs YOUR HELP NOW HERE!

  • #2
    SpaceX is also looking to send the first manned Dragon capsule to the ISS somewhere between 2015 and 2017.
    Why wait so long?

    It's already been there and back successfully twice.


    Philip
    "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

    Comment


    • #3
      From SpaceX's webpage;

      http://www.spacex.com/press.php?page=20121028
      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
      “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
      Present Current Events are the Future's History

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PhilipLaos View Post
        Why wait so long?

        It's already been there and back successfully twice.


        Philip
        We probably have to ask SpaceX peoples, but this from their site might be a clue;

        Transporting Crew
        To ensure a rapid transition from cargo to crew capability, the cargo and crew configurations of Dragon are almost identical, with the exception of the crew escape system, the life support system and onboard controls that allow the crew to take over control from the flight computer when needed. This focus on commonality minimizes the design effort and simplifies the human rating process, allowing systems critical to Dragon crew safety and space station safety to be fully tested on unmanned demonstration flights and cargo resupply missions
        For cargo launches the inside of the spacecraft is outfitted with a modular cargo rack system designed to accommodate pressurized cargo in standard sizes and form factors. For crewed launches, the interior is outfitted with crew couches, controls with manual override capability and upgraded life-support.


        http://www.spacex.com/dragon.php
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
        “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
        Present Current Events are the Future's History

        Comment


        • #5
          Interesting question, the naval recovery crews for gemini, apollo etc, numbered in the hundreds of ships and tens of thousands of men, which must have cost a bomb. I haven't been able to find what spacex's recovery plans for manned missions will be, wondered how many Planes andships they will need, and how much it will cost?
          Last edited by Chukka; 02 Nov 12, 01:59.
          One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

          "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
          Wu Cheng'en Monkey

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Chukka View Post
            Interesting question, the naval recovery crews for gemini, apollo etc, numbered in the hundreds of ships and tens of thousands of men, which must have cost a bomb. I haven't been able to find what spacex's recovery plans for manned missions will be, wondered how many Planes andships they will need, and how much it will cost?
            Recovering space capsules from approximate locations in the oceans strikes me as extremely regressive. That's what was done through the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions until we moved beyond that with the arrival of the Space Shuttle which could land on a runway.

            Now we seem to be going backwards in terms of recovering space vehicles, at least as far as Space X is concerned.

            However, unlike Space X, Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic spacecrafts will be launched at high altitude and land back on a regular runway.

            That's what I would call progressive.


            Philip
            "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by PhilipLaos View Post
              Recovering space capsules from approximate locations in the oceans strikes me as extremely regressive. That's what was done through the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions until we moved beyond that with the arrival of the Space Shuttle which could land on a runway.

              Now we seem to be going backwards in terms of recovering space vehicles, at least as far as Space X is concerned.

              However, unlike Space X, Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic spacecrafts will be launched at high altitude and land back on a regular runway.

              That's what I would call progressive.


              Philip
              While not progressive, ocean splash down is a cost effective, safe, and reliable method of space craft recovery. We still use rockets to get things in orbit so the lift off technology has not progressed very much either (conceptually).

              SpaceX can't afford to take risks and they don't need to. NASA already developed the splash down technology for them so why not use it? GPS makes it much easier to find that cork bobbing in the ocean than back in the "good ol' days".

              It's hard to believe but space launch technology is 50 years old now. The principles of orbital insertion have not changed, the physics is the same. However, the technologies (e.g. computers) used are well developed at this point so space travel is on the verge of becoming "commonplace".

              We live in an exciting age where science fiction is becoming science "fact".
              Battles are dangerous affairs... Wang Hsi

              Comment

              Latest Topics

              Collapse

              Working...
              X