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The EPA's approval of E15 fuel for commercial use

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  • The EPA's approval of E15 fuel for commercial use

    E15 has been introduced and I would like to share what I've found out about what could be detrimental to your vehicle, air quality and food prices.

    http://www.epa.gov/otaq/regs/fuels/a...15/e15-faq.htm

    What is E15?
    E15 is a blend of gasoline and up to 15 vol% ethanol. The primary source of ethanol is corn, but other grains or biomass sources may be used as feedstocks.

    What Vehicles May Use E15?
    • Flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs)
    • model year 2001 and newer cars
    • model year 2001 light-duty trucks
    • model year 2001 medium-duty passenger vehicles (SUVs)

    What Vehicles and Engines May Not Use E15?
    • All motorcycles
    • All vehicles with heavy-duty engines, such as school buses, transit buses, and delivery trucks
    • All off-road vehicles, such as boats and snowmobiles
    • All engines in off-road equipment, such as lawnmowers and chain saws
    • All model year 2000 and older cars, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles (SUVs)


    What is the E15 Waiver?
    In order to protect the emission control systems of vehicles and engines, the Clean Air Act prohibits the introduction into commerce of fuels or fuel additives that are not substantially similar to the fuels or fuel additives used in certifying vehicles and engines to emission standards. However, the Clean Air Act authorizes EPA to grant a waiver of this prohibition if it can be demonstrated that the vehicles and engines using the otherwise prohibited fuel or fuel additive will continue to meet their emission standards over their “full useful life” (e.g., 100,000 or 120,000 miles for light-duty motor vehicles, depending on the vehicle type and model year).
    However, the Dept. of Energy did tests and found inconclusively based on its vehicle test group that E15 did not meet emissions standards in vehicles model year 2001 and newer. Eight cars from model years 2000-2003 from manufactured by Chevy, Dodge, Ford, Honda, Nissan and Toyota were tested. There were three light-duty trucks and five cars. No thorough analysis besides this was done to approve the waiver. This doesn't include the damages done to the engine by misfueling which will happen unintentionally and intentionally where E15 is sold.

    When it Comes to E15, Never Mind the Data
    May 5, 2011
    http://www.ewg.org/agmag/2011/05/whe...mind-the-data/

    Before it acted, EPA was required under the Clean Air Act to analyze emissions from vehicles burning E15 to prove that air pollution would not increase. The agency dutifully relied on Department of Energy (DOE) testing of various vehicles manufactured between 2001 and 2006.

    Environmental Working Group has examined the Energy Department’s raw data for three pollutants – non-methane organic gases (NMOG), carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrous oxide (NOx) – emitted by vehicles burning E15. Here’s what we found:
    • Four out of the eight vehicles tested failed at least one emissions test.
    • Three other vehicles’ emissions tests were within 15 percentage points of failing.
    • There were several more emissions failures in vehicles tested with E20, a 20 percent ethanol blend that ethanol groups such as Growth Energy claim will have no harmful effects on engines or other vehicle components.

    ...
    corn ethanol facilities powered by coal and natural gas INCREASE greenhouse gases (GHG). See the tables at EPA’s website: http://www.epa.gov/oms/renewablefuels/420f09024.htm. Corn ethanol produced from these facilities generates more GHGs as compared with gasoline.
    Along with increased farm land pressure to grow fuel and rising food prices we have to weigh GHG (greenhouse gas) savings from using ethanol against which type of energy is being used to power these corn ethanol plants. You must also take into account the GHG emissions to plant, fertilize, and harvest the corn. Also to those that think ethanol produces less emissions that gasoline, ethanol has 2/3 the energy compared to gasoline. That means ethanol produces 19% more CO2 than gasoline for the same energy. A study by Stanford atmospheric scientist Mark Z. Jacobson, in the Environmental Science & Technology journal found that E85 fuel:
    Study warns of health risk from ethanol
    http://www.sfgate.com/health/article...ol-2601178.php
    April 18, 2007
    His study showed that the city would experience a 9 percent increase in the rate of ozone-related respiratory deaths -- 120 more deaths per year -- compared with what would have been projected in 2020 assuming continued gasoline use.

    Pollution from ethanol would be riskier than pollution from gasoline because when ethanol breaks down in the atmosphere, it generates considerably more ozone. Ozone is a highly corrosive gas that damages the delicate tissues of the lungs.
    ...
    The basic principles of Jacobson's paper are sound, David Pimentel, an ecology professor emeritus at Cornell University, wrote in an e-mail.

    "The burning of ethanol releases large quantities of ozone, a serious air pollutant," he said. "In addition, the use of ethanol as a fuel releases formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, plus benzene and butadiene. All of these are carcinogens and are a threat to public health."

    Jacobson's study, however, concluded that the cancer-causing effects of ethanol would be roughly comparable to those of gasoline.


    Ten Reasons To Care That E15 Ethanol Is On The Way To Your Gas Station
    9/23/2012
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/larrybel...r-gas-station/
    The American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers Association (AFPM), representing U.S. refiners, along with a number of other industries and organizations, including automakers, small equipment and boat manufacturers and owners, motorcycle groups, food groups and the environmental community, are highly concerned with the host of potential problems in allowing E15 into commercial use. Regardless of EPA’s blind approval of its use, studies have shown that it’s not suitable for any gasoline-powered engine, including ones EPA has deemed capable of running on E15.

    A recent study by the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) found that the use of E15 can result in significant engine damage in newer vehicles. Nearly 5 million vehicles currently on the road have similar characteristics to the newer vehicles that failed in the study.
    ...
    Testing conducted by the Department of Energy of E15 simply looked at the ability of the pollution control equipment of some cars to stand up to E15. The DOE did not conduct needed testing to determine the impact of the fuel on engine durability; tolerance of the check-engine light; durability of other important components, such as the fuel pump and the fuel level sensor; and a number of other automotive functions.
    ...
    Without exception, the auto manufacturers responded that use of E15, even in their newest vehicles, would damage engines, void warranties and reduce fuel efficiencies. Interestingly, the gas caps of many new cars sold today explicitly warn consumers NOT to use E15.

    But most cars on the road today, powerboats and power outdoor equipment do not come with this warning, and once E15 is available, misfueling will be a problem.
    ...
    many consumers may not realize that ethanol is less energy efficient than gasoline and provides lower fuel economy, eliminating—and indeed reversing—the perceived lower price.

    Misfueling is also likely in other gasoline engines and could have detrimental effects. Snowmobile engines could stop miles from shelter and boat engines could fail in the middle of the ocean. Chain saws could overheat and run when their operators wanted them off, endangering operator safety.
    ...
    Unfortunately, our legal challenge to EPA’s E15 waiver has not been successful. In late August, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia decided to dismiss, on purely procedural grounds, a lawsuit from AFPM and other industry groups challenging the waiver to increase the ethanol content.
    If E15 was the only fuel available and you happen to drive a 1968 Mustang what/where could you find to put in it? Drive to the airport and fill up on aviation gasoline?
    The Europa Barbarorum II team [M2TW] needs YOUR HELP NOW HERE!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Frtigern View Post
    E15 has been introduced and I would like to share what I've found out about what could be detrimental to your vehicle, air quality and food prices.



    However, the Dept. of Energy did tests and found inconclusively based on its vehicle test group that E15 did not meet emissions standards in vehicles model year 2001 and newer. Eight cars from model years 2000-2003 from manufactured by Chevy, Dodge, Ford, Honda, Nissan and Toyota were tested. There were three light-duty trucks and five cars. No thorough analysis besides this was done to approve the waiver. This doesn't include the damages done to the engine by misfueling which will happen unintentionally and intentionally where E15 is sold.



    Along with increased farm land pressure to grow fuel and rising food prices we have to weigh GHG (greenhouse gas) savings from using ethanol against which type of energy is being used to power these corn ethanol plants. You must also take into account the GHG emissions to plant, fertilize, and harvest the corn. Also to those that think ethanol produces less emissions that gasoline, ethanol has 2/3 the energy compared to gasoline. That means ethanol produces 19% more CO2 than gasoline for the same energy. A study by Stanford atmospheric scientist Mark Z. Jacobson, in the Environmental Science & Technology journal found that E85 fuel:






    If E15 was the only fuel available and you happen to drive a 1968 Mustang what/where could you find to put in it? Drive to the airport and fill up on aviation gasoline?
    IF so your only assuning here. I run E10 and have Zero/NO problems at all with a model 08.
    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

    you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

    Comment


    • #3
      90% of gas stations sell E10, and there was no controversy, perhaps because a little ethanol in our gasoline does us good, but they add more with a waiver and some sketchy data and the American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers Association files a lawsuit. There is a law that says that they must add more and more ethanol to our fuel to reduce GHG emissions. Individuals and industries have already stated that perhaps ethanol is not a permanent solution, but is just a transition until we develop a carbon neutral fuel. Ethanol is not good for engines, its a solvent and does not have as much energy. Less energy = less efficiency. Solvents can lead to gaskets and rings being worn faster and if not replaced regularly, may cause a greater loss of efficiency and eventually failure. Flexfuel vehicles are modified to accept the higher ethanol percentage. So E10, good for all vehicles, but E15 was only good for 2007 and newer vehicles, then they added a waiver so that vehicles 2001 and newer could use it but the data has been contested because burning the new E15 would violate the EPA's Clean Air Act on emissions standards. There are more cars that are 2006 and older but not as many that are 2007 and newer. I think EPA was afraid that if they didn't allow the waiver that would've meant a lot of vehicles that couldn't use it. I wonder what emissions test will show when these 2001-2006 vehicles start showing up for smogging and fail 1 in 4 of them because of running E15.
      The Europa Barbarorum II team [M2TW] needs YOUR HELP NOW HERE!

      Comment


      • #4
        Unless you have a vehicle designed for E-85, you will start experiencing problems with fuel delivery systems in your cars, even the newer ones when the 10% levels get increased to 15% or more. Mileage will drop at a time when Obama is mandating fleet mileages of 50 mpg or more.

        Given the fact that 40% of a normal corn crop is already being converted to ethanol using taxpayer's and borrowed dollars to make up the production cost differences, such increases will contribute to an additional corn shortage and higher prices for food for the next several years

        And, if a gas station has a problem with water in their fuel, it will not go to the bottom of the tank but instead contaminate the gas to the point that it will ruin car fuel systems and engines. That happened two years ago to over 50 cars from a local Admiral station when a tanker full of water contaminated fuel filled the tanks. Most of those cars, that quit running less then a mile from the station, required thousands of dollars of repairs to fuel systems and engines.
        Last edited by SRV Ron; 06 Oct 12, 07:31.
        “Breaking News,”

        “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

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