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Impact ~ NEO; Near Earth Objects

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
    Appeal to authority. Gotcha.
    More like did you actually read the full article and understand it.

    Leave a comment:


  • OpanaPointer
    replied
    Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
    EXCERPT:
    Dr Martin Sweatman, of the University of Edinburgh’s School of Engineering, who led the research, said: "I think this research, along with the recent finding of a widespread platinum anomaly across the North American continent virtually seal the case in favour of (a Younger Dryas comet impact).
    "Our work serves to reinforce that physical evidence. What is happening here is the process of paradigm change.
    "It appears Göbekli Tepe was, among other things, an observatory for monitoring the night sky.
    “One of its pillars seems to have served as a memorial to this devastating event – probably the worst day in history since the end of the ice age.”
    .....
    Maybe you should have read further. Dr. Sweatman may disagree with you.
    Appeal to authority. Gotcha.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
    I call bullshit.
    EXCERPT:
    Dr Martin Sweatman, of the University of Edinburgh’s School of Engineering, who led the research, said: "I think this research, along with the recent finding of a widespread platinum anomaly across the North American continent virtually seal the case in favour of (a Younger Dryas comet impact).
    "Our work serves to reinforce that physical evidence. What is happening here is the process of paradigm change.
    "It appears Göbekli Tepe was, among other things, an observatory for monitoring the night sky.
    “One of its pillars seems to have served as a memorial to this devastating event – probably the worst day in history since the end of the ice age.”
    .....
    Maybe you should have read further. Dr. Sweatman may disagree with you.

    Leave a comment:


  • OpanaPointer
    replied
    Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
    Ancient stone carvings confirm how comet struck Earth in 10,950BC, sparking the rise of civilisations

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2...0950bc-wiping/
    The idea had been originally put forward by author Graham Hancock in his book Magicians of the Gods.
    I call bullshit.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Ancient stone carvings confirm how comet struck Earth in 10,950BC, sparking the rise of civilisations

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2...0950bc-wiping/

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Lastest passage, update;
    Giant asteroid makes its closest approach to Earth

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/scienc...SXK?li=BBnbcA1

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    The greatest danger asteroids pose to us is not from the impact

    EXCERPT:
    ...
    Wind kills. The most casualties from an asteroid impact won’t come from the impact itself. The wind, pressure and heat caused by the crash are far more dangerous, no matter where the asteroid hits.
    Clemens Rumpf at the University of Southampton, UK, and his colleagues have calculated the mortality risk, should an asteroid hit a residential area. They considered asteroids that burn up completely, those that hit the ground, and those that strike in water. Surprisingly, the airborne side effects were the ones that cost the most lives.
    As an asteroid hurtles towards the ground, it deposits a huge amount of energy into the atmosphere, resulting in a powerful shockwave, tornado-like winds and a plume of fire trailing behind it. When it crashes down, it forms a crater, shaking the ground around the impact and hurling debris into the air.

    If the asteroid hits water (which is twice as likely as hitting land), it would create a tsunami, with waves reaching dozens of metres high. The farther from shore the impact is, the deeper the water and the taller the waves.
    ...
    https://www.newscientist.com/article...om-the-impact/

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
    Why wait? As some say getter done now...
    I'm hoping for a little advanced warning so I can enjoy it knowing there won't be anything as good ever again, instead of wasting it on a perfectly ordinary day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bwaha
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
    Why not? I've got a bottle of very good Scotch I would like to drink before I die.
    Why wait? As some say getter done now...

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
    The sky is falling, The sky is falling...

    We're all gonna die, why worry about when.
    Why not? I've got a bottle of very good Scotch I would like to drink before I die.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Another one slipped by;
    Sneaky asteroid spotted whizzing between Earth and moon
    A space rock large enough to do damage gives us a near miss just two days after being discovered.
    https://www.cnet.com/news/asteroid-2...th-moon-slooh/

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Looks like a big one from long ago ...

    Satellite spots MASSIVE object hidden under the frozen wastes of Antarctica
    Scientists baffled by bizarre observations of gigantic 'anomaly' buried beneath polar icecap

    EXCERPTS:
    It stretches for a distance of 151 miles across and has a maximum depth of about 848 metres.

    Some researchers believe it is the remains of a truly massive asteroid which was more than twice the size of the Chicxulub space rock which wiped out the dinosaurs.

    If this explanation is true, it could mean this killer asteroid caused the Permian–Triassic extinction event which killed 96 percent of Earth’s sea creatures and up to 70 percent of the vertebrate organisms living on land.
    ...
    This “Wilkes Land gravity anomaly” was first uncovered in 2006, when NASA satellites spotted gravitational changes which indicated the presence of a huge object sitting in the middle of a 300 mile wide impact crater.
    ...
    "This Wilkes Land impact is much bigger than the impact that killed the dinosaurs, and probably would have caused catastrophic damage at the time," said Ralph von Frese, who was a professor of geological sciences at Ohio State University when he discovered the "killer crater" on 2006.

    "All the environmental changes that would have resulted from the impact would have created a highly caustic environment that was really hard to endure. So it makes sense that a lot of life went extinct at that time."
    ...
    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/248944...of-antarctica/

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Hopefully a long time before we see one like this, excerpt;
    ...
    The reconstruction of the event 66 million years ago was made possible by drilling into the remnant bowl and analysing its rocks.
    These show how the space impactor made the hard surface of the planet slosh back and forth like a fluid.
    At one stage, a mountain higher than Everest was thrown up before collapsing back into a smaller range of peaks.
    "And this all happens on the scale of minutes, which is quite amazing," Prof Joanna Morgan from Imperial College London, UK, told BBC News.
    ...
    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38019604

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Incoming! How NASA and FEMA Would Respond to an Asteroid Threat
    EXCERPT:
    ...
    NASA and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) came together Oct. 25 to plan a response to such a hypothetical event. In a "tabletop exercise," a kind of ongoing simulation, the two agencies tested how they would work together to evaluate the threat, prevent panic and protect as many people as possible from the deadly collision.

    "It's not a matter of if, but when, we will deal with such a situation," Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA's Science Mission Directorate's new associate administrator, said in a statement. "But unlike any other time in our history, we now have the ability to respond to an impact threat through continued observations, predictions, response planning and mitigation."
    ...
    http://www.space.com/34629-nasa-fema...pact-test.html

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Two undetected close fly-bys within a month!

    This most recent was closest at about 24,800 miles, just a bit beyond geo-synchronus orbit. Too bad we aren't in a position to nudge this into GEO when it came by, even if we knew it was coming.

    Second Asteroid In A Month Sails By Without Us Detecting It First

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/top...4Vx?li=BBnb7Kz

    Leave a comment:

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