Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Best Field of History to Study

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    That's what I'ma fraid of, the bias. I personally would love to go to AMU. I think it'd be fun and affordable. But I'm seriously afraid of not being able to get a job at respectable government agencies or museums. Then again, if the employer gives me a chance to explain I'm sure I could defend my choice.

    I'm really going back and forth right now. I recently began thinking about public history, which is more practical. Again though, the most affordable school with programs in that deals primarily with medieval history which is far from what I want to study.

    I'm actually quite frustrated. With a decision like this that could affect my entire future it's awfully hard to decide. You really made the program sound great, and it has great reviews, but I haven't heard any testimony from people who weren't already in their chosen field. I'm trying to break into a field, I haven't already started working in it, so I worry about a degree like this hurting more than helping.

    EDIT: Here's a thought: Would moving to West Virginia or Manassas allow me to interact with any professors at AMU? Or are they scattered all over the place, too? I've always wanted to live in that area and it would give me a nice excuse to move there.
    Last edited by MV64; 29 May 09, 10:35.
    Check out my e-book: The Spanish American War: A Brief History, available at Barnes & Noble, Smashwords and other retailers.

    Comment


    • #32
      I don't think it will be a question of defending your choice so much as forming connections so that the work becomes available in the first place. So much work is obtained through "know who."

      One thing I would recommend in looking at programs is finding out where the graduates end up. Talk to the department--they should have some idea of where their grads end up. Also look at people who have the sort of job you want. Where did they go? A lot of people put their quals on-line now, so you might be able to get some idea.
      Every 10 years a great man.
      Who paid the bill?

      Comment


      • #33
        I understand the networking aspect. It's what frightens me, to be honest. I've never been good at networking. I'm not pushy enough to get my name out there. I'm always polite and friendly, but never really "remembered" in a conversation I don't think. It's why my professors don't really know me. I'm a great student and everything, and I can get one or two quality letters of recommendation, I think.

        I honestly can't make up my mind what to do. I've become really indecisive. I need to make a decision soon in order to get the GRE out of the way and my foreign language, but I just can't decide whether it's a good idea to commit the time and money into a physical school somewhere like I used to dream about doing.

        I could wait a few years, but what work could I get working with history with only a bachelor's? And what about letters of recommendation?

        Just seems like my options are really limited more than I thought they would be, and I felt I had a pretty realistic grasp of things going into college, knowing it'd be hard to make a career out of history.
        Check out my e-book: The Spanish American War: A Brief History, available at Barnes & Noble, Smashwords and other retailers.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by MV64 View Post
          I understand the networking aspect. It's what frightens me, to be honest. I've never been good at networking. I'm not pushy enough to get my name out there. I'm always polite and friendly, but never really "remembered" in a conversation I don't think. It's why my professors don't really know me. I'm a great student and everything, and I can get one or two quality letters of recommendation, I think.

          I honestly can't make up my mind what to do. I've become really indecisive. I need to make a decision soon in order to get the GRE out of the way and my foreign language, but I just can't decide whether it's a good idea to commit the time and money into a physical school somewhere like I used to dream about doing.

          I could wait a few years, but what work could I get working with history with only a bachelor's? And what about letters of recommendation?

          Just seems like my options are really limited more than I thought they would be, and I felt I had a pretty realistic grasp of things going into college, knowing it'd be hard to make a career out of history.
          Welcome to the club. I'm facing a very similar situation here.
          "To be defeated and not submit, is victory; to be victorious and rest on one's laurels, is defeat."
          --Marshal Józef Piłsudski

          Comment


          • #35
            I guess we just have to hope that everything will work out for the best, right?
            Check out my e-book: The Spanish American War: A Brief History, available at Barnes & Noble, Smashwords and other retailers.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by MV64 View Post
              I understand the networking aspect. It's what frightens me, to be honest. I've never been good at networking. I'm not pushy enough to get my name out there. I'm always polite and friendly, but never really "remembered" in a conversation I don't think. It's why my professors don't really know me. I'm a great student and everything, and I can get one or two quality letters of recommendation, I think.

              I honestly can't make up my mind what to do. I've become really indecisive. I need to make a decision soon in order to get the GRE out of the way and my foreign language, but I just can't decide whether it's a good idea to commit the time and money into a physical school somewhere like I used to dream about doing.

              I could wait a few years, but what work could I get working with history with only a bachelor's? And what about letters of recommendation?

              Just seems like my options are really limited more than I thought they would be, and I felt I had a pretty realistic grasp of things going into college, knowing it'd be hard to make a career out of history.
              The "networking" in academia isn't like business gladhanding. Academics tend to be socially inept. It's invitations to give papers, coauthor articles, share research, getting a bump up on a job or a grant because the Dept chair knows your advisor. That sort of thing.

              It's possible a year off might be a good idea, just so you aren't rushing into anything.
              Every 10 years a great man.
              Who paid the bill?

              Comment


              • #37
                I'm glad to see that I am not the only one comptemplating this issue. I'm looking to get my masters in military history and then figuring out how I can use it as a career.

                Comment


                • #38
                  I don't belittle anyone who takes the effort in getting their masters, from U of Phoneix or any site. Time and the ability to go is such the key to higher education. Brick~mortar schools want to keep you taking courses to keep money pumped into their coffers. Any job that would turn up their nose at anyone with a degree, then masters, isn't a place I want to work for. I have my BA in History, have been teaching for almost twenty years, but now I see I have to re-sharpen my educational sword and get my masters to stay competitive if I want the more prestigious schools.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re military history.
                    The "new" military history (I gather that's what its called), of which I am a proponent, does more than just look at grand strategy, battles, tactics, etc. It integrates political/social/economic/diplomatic/cultural history with the miloitary aspect of history and tries to discover how that impacts on people in campaigms, battles etc. I'm especially interested in examining military history as a variant of history-from-below. Of course this stuff is hard to recover, but it can be done.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      MV64,

                      I wouldn't suggest pulling up stakes and moving to WV or Manassas because most of AMU's professors are fairly scattered around the country, just as the students are. Several of them do live in the Northern Virginia area, but that is because they either teach at university's in the area or have government jobs close to DC in addition to teaching their online courses.

                      I'm also trying to get my foot in the door too, so I know how you feel. I was doing fairly well there as I was a photo editor for a history magazine group before getting laid off. So I feel I've taken a step or two backwards since then. I didn't know anyone when I got the job at the magazine, I just did it on my own. All I had was experience as a military photographer and a bachelors of history degree at the time. I just pestered the editor-in-chief until he gave me an interview and the job. It always helps to know the right people, but it isn't necessary as long as you have the drive to do what you want to do.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Thanks for the input everyone. As of right now I plan on staying at my undergrad to get my Masters in History. Hopefully with a focus on military history.

                        I've been keeping my eye out on some jobs, and after I get my Masters I plan on moving out to the DC area and pounding the pavement until I can uncover one of those historian jobs I see the Army, Senate, State Dept. and CIA post every once and a while.
                        Check out my e-book: The Spanish American War: A Brief History, available at Barnes & Noble, Smashwords and other retailers.

                        Comment

                        Latest Topics

                        Collapse

                        Working...
                        X