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What Really Happened to Amelia Earhart?

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  • What Really Happened to Amelia Earhart?

    I’ve seen several comments all over the internet regarding her actual skills as a pilot, but the evidence for this is scarce. I would like to find out more about this.

    This link might shed some light on the realities of her notoriety and expectations.

    Earhart’s position in history might seem strange. Her talents as a pilot were questioned, perhaps with envy, by many contemporaries. Her fame grew out of a flight on which she was simply a passenger—as important as “a sack of potatoes,” according to one critic— when she became the first woman to cross the Atlantic by air. And her ultimate notoriety came from a flight that failed—her 1937 round-the-world attempt.

    https://www.historynet.com/amelia.htm
    Last edited by Achtung Baby; 21 Dec 19, 14:46.
    "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
    Ernest Hemingway.

  • #2
    Some say that there were better female pilots, and Amelia Earhart was a so-so pilot and a terrible navigator during an age of great pilots and natural navigators. She was already famous due to being married to a rich and famous man, and then becoming the first celebrity fashion designer.
    Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

    Prayers.

    BoRG

    http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Salinator View Post
      Some say that there were better female pilots, and Amelia Earhart was a so-so pilot and a terrible navigator during an age of great pilots and natural navigators. She was already famous due to being married to a rich and famous man, and then becoming the first celebrity fashion designer.
      I’ve read about how her limelight was overshadowing other female pilots but I don’t know much about the navigation side of things. From what I’ve read and heard, her flight to Howland island is not a good example to her navigation skills, especially with Noonan onboard.
      "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
      Ernest Hemingway.

      Comment


      • #4
        Celebrities then were just like celebrities now...mostly hype. Her real "fame" comes from the mystery of her disappearance.
        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Achtung Baby View Post

          I’ve read about how her limelight was overshadowing other female pilots but I don’t know much about the navigation side of things. From what I’ve read and heard, her flight to Howland island is not a good example to her navigation skills, especially with Noonan onboard.
          She had a bad habit of not taking blame for her mistakes. It was always someone else or something's fault. During one of her crashes, when she emerged from the cockpit and in a rare moment of candor, she remarked to the people at the scene that it was all her fault. However, later she blamed the pilot that had last flown the plane to have damaged the landing carriage, and claimed that what she meant to attribute as her fault, was actually referring to her husband tripping and breaking a rib when he was running to the plane when he witnessed the crash. Apparently she was blessed with superhuman binocular vision AND a medical magic vision ball.

          Amelia Earhart and flying is kind of like Paris Hilton and DJing,

          Her contemporaries claimed that who actually did most of her flying was a professional pilot hired by her husband that was listed as her mechanic so as not to take any of her thunder.
          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
          Celebrities then were just like celebrities now...mostly hype. Her real "fame" comes from the mystery of her disappearance.
          She was already famous in her time before she did any flying. Her disappearance and fortunate name is what kept her legend alive. Her name sounds romantic, exciting, and proper for a pilot. Amelia (striving, industrious, defender) AIR HEART.
          Last edited by Salinator; 21 Dec 19, 21:12.
          Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

          Prayers.

          BoRG

          http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Salinator View Post
            She had a bad habit of not taking blame for her mistakes. It was always someone else or something's fault. During one of her crashes, when she emerged from the cockpit and in a rare moment of candor, she remarked to the people at the scene that it was all her fault. However, later she blamed the pilot that had last flown the plane to have damaged the landing carriage, and claimed that what she meant to attribute as her fault, was actually referring to her husband tripping and breaking a rib when he was running to the plane when he witnessed the crash. Apparently she was blessed with superhuman binocular vision AND a medical magic vision ball.

            Amelia Earhart and flying is kind of like Paris Hilton and DJing,

            Her contemporaries claimed that who actually did most of her flying was a professional pilot hired by her husband that was listed as her mechanic so as not to take any of her thunder.


            She was already famous in her time before she did any flying. Her disappearance and fortunate name is what kept her legend alive. Her name sounds romantic, exciting, and proper for a pilot. Amelia (striving, industrious, defender) AIR HEART.
            Except that it's "Ear" hart.

            The public have always liked their meaningless, empty headed celebrities...still do.
            Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

            Comment


            • #7
              She can't that bad of a pilot if she flew solo across the Atlantic.
              "Advances in technology tend to overwhelm me."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Salinator View Post
                She had a bad habit of not taking blame for her mistakes. It was always someone else or something's fault. During one of her crashes, when she emerged from the cockpit and in a rare moment of candor, she remarked to the people at the scene that it was all her fault. However, later she blamed the pilot that had last flown the plane to have damaged the landing carriage, and claimed that what she meant to attribute as her fault, was actually referring to her husband tripping and breaking a rib when he was running to the plane when he witnessed the crash. Apparently she was blessed with superhuman binocular vision AND a medical magic vision ball.

                Amelia Earhart and flying is kind of like Paris Hilton and DJing,

                Her contemporaries claimed that who actually did most of her flying was a professional pilot hired by her husband that was listed as her mechanic so as not to take any of her thunder.
                I don't see any reason to doubt your point, there is one thing that bugs me though. Given the lack of experience that she is claimed to have, and Noonan was an experienced navigator... why is most of the criticism directed at her?

                One theory regarding Noonan, is the idea that things went downhill after crossing the international date line.

                http://www.datelinetheory.com/p/effe...date-line.html
                Last edited by Achtung Baby; 22 Dec 19, 15:01.
                "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
                Ernest Hemingway.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Slug View Post
                  She can't that bad of a pilot if she flew solo across the Atlantic.
                  My thoughts exactly.
                  "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
                  Ernest Hemingway.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Slug View Post
                    She can't that bad of a pilot if she flew solo across the Atlantic.
                    It was a short flight, Newfoundland to Ireland. Lindbergh flew to Pairs WITHOUT forward vision other than a periscope.
                    Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                    Prayers.

                    BoRG

                    http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Salinator View Post

                      It was a short flight, Newfoundland to Ireland. Lindbergh flew to Pairs WITHOUT forward vision other than a periscope.
                      And yet Lindbergh fell asleep and almost went into the ocean. Top speed on his aircraft was s-l-o-w, lots of noise and vibration, and the aircraft had to be flown by hand constantly. Just peeing must have been a major challenge.

                      As to why no forward vision? Not the way I would want to do it, but that was his choice. Something to do with fuel tankage, IIRC.
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Slug View Post
                        She can't that bad of a pilot if she flew solo across the Atlantic.
                        She wasn't. Flight was in its infancy, and the aircraft were as well. Her Electra was actually cutting edge for the times.


                        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

                          And yet Lindbergh fell asleep and almost went into the ocean. Top speed on his aircraft was s-l-o-w, lots of noise and vibration, and the aircraft had to be flown by hand constantly. Just peeing must have been a major challenge.

                          As to why no forward vision? Not the way I would want to do it, but that was his choice. Something to do with fuel tankage, IIRC.
                          Spirit Of St. Louis was custom built to hold enough fuel for the trip. There was a fuel cell between Lindbergh and the engine, taking up all the space where glass windshield would have been. Imagine the skill needed to fly that thing, especially for takeoff and landing?

                          Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                          Prayers.

                          BoRG

                          http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

                            She wasn't. Flight was in its infancy, and the aircraft were as well. Her Electra was actually cutting edge for the times.

                            Between Lindbergh's flight and hers, aviation technology had made huge leaps, especially in engine. BF-109 was about to hit the drawing board.

                            Earhart never did master two engines.
                            Last edited by Salinator; 23 Dec 19, 22:04.
                            Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                            Prayers.

                            BoRG

                            http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Salinator View Post



                              Between Lindbergh's flight and hers, aviation technology had made huge leaps, especially in engine. BF-109 was about the hit the drawing board.

                              Earhart never did master two engines.
                              ...A ghost of aviation
                              She was swallowed by the sky
                              Or by the sea like me she had a dream to fly
                              Like Icarus ascending
                              On beautiful foolish arms
                              Amelia it was just a false alarm...

                              Joni Mitchell, from "Hejira"


                              Propeller pitch and gear rotation was a major barrier between the twenties and the 1930's pilot. a lot of initial training crashes in the RAF occurred when pilots were transitioing between fixed gear, fixed pitch aircraft and the 'newfangled stuff.". the miles master was introduced to provide an intermediate step.

                              the loss of pitch in the 1930's often meant a non feathering, windmilling, dragging engine to be compensated for fast before the aircraft stalled and spun.
                              Last edited by marktwain; 22 Dec 19, 16:40.
                              The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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