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Fav Historian?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Duncan
    I would like to recind my previous vote. Here I am looking over top of my computer at my 'to read' shelf. And there is the man's name right in front of me. The man who said, "History will be kind to me, for I intend to write it." None other than Winston Churchill. He was Prime Minister of a pivotal nation during WWII. He was one of three most important Allied leaders at the time. Patton's reading list, released by his widow, includes, 'Anything by Winston Churchill.' And his series on WWII won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1953.

    Yup, he's the one.
    Like you, my copy sits on the shelf unread--how much influence is that?
    Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 21 Jun 06, 08:59.
    Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong
      Like you, my copy sits on the shelf unread--how much influence is that?
      I read it a long while ago. It's waiting for re-reading. I actually need to buy a less worn set and it's missing a book. In fact, I'll order a new set today.

      I also don't count myself as peer review. If you and I read the series will that make Churchill a better historian? I have an unread copy of Don Quixote. I am told by people who study literature proffesionally that it is an excellent and important book regardless of my participation.

      The reason I get enthused about Churchill is because he is not a passive writer. He created history and then put it to paper. Perhaps this makes him less objective. Yes, it does. But there is great passion in his writing and a viewpoint that only someone in his position is capable of giving.
      Last edited by Duncan; 21 Jun 06, 09:49.
      AHIKS - Play by (E)mail board wargaming since 1965.
      The Blitz - Play by Email computer wargaming.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Duncan

        I also don't count myself as peer review. If you and I read the series will that make Churchill a better historian? I have an unread copy of Don Quixote. I am told by people who study literature proffesionally that it is an excellent and important book regardless of my participation.
        I thought we were talking about the influence of a historian vice the efficacy of his history(to use your above analogy). To have influence one would have to be read, and for wider influence, one would have to be read widely.
        Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong
          I thought we were talking about the influence of a historian vice the efficacy of his history(to use your above analogy). To have influence one would have to be read, and for wider influence, one would have to be read widely.
          Yeah. I think Churchill is widely read. Just not by you and me. That's why I would stick to Ambrose as most influencial. Patton read Churchill a lot and thought very highly of him. I value Patton's opinion more than my own.

          Oh yeah, I know I know. Don what his name is Spanish lit, not English.
          Last edited by Duncan; 21 Jun 06, 12:23.
          AHIKS - Play by (E)mail board wargaming since 1965.
          The Blitz - Play by Email computer wargaming.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Duncan
            Yeah. I think Churchill is widely read. Just not by you and me. That's why I would stick to Ambrose as most influencial. Patton read Churchill a lot and thought very highly of him. I value Patton's opinion more than my own.

            Oh yeah, I know I know. Don what his name is Spanish lit, not English.
            IN the sound-byte age, those multi-volume tomes do not get read. Agree, with you, Ambrose probably, for better or worse, reaches a wider readership--particularly in non-academics.
            Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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            • #21
              I would give the slightest edge to Keegen for his historical accuracy and his readability. With that being said, Ambrose's and Churchill's works are just as essential for a complete understanding of the conflict. Ambrose for his ability to put you in the shoes of the man in the field and Churchill for his prospective as the only leader of a major combatant to write anything about the conflict (plus Winston was a truly fine wordsmith).
              Lance W.

              Peace through superior firepower.

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