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  • Google Print

    http://print.google.com/intl/en/googleprint/about.html

    Have not had time to check this out too fully just as of yet - but appears to be another free (well for now) research tool from Google.

  • #2
    I haven't been following it too closely, but several publishers banded together to sue Google over this. Google has continued scanning books however, so I'm not sure where the case stands now (in a WSJ I got recently they had a headline about Google continuing to scan, but I didn't get a chance to read the story). I'm guessing Google made a statement to the effect of: "Our stock is almost at 400, which is probably 4 times the combined value of you people. We shall do as we wish."
    “To discriminate against a thoroughly upright citizen because he belongs to some particular church, or because, like Abraham Lincoln, he has not avowed his allegiance to any church, is an outrage against that liberty of conscience which is one of the foundations of American life.”

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Overseer
      I'm guessing Google made a statement to the effect of: "Our stock is almost at 400, which is probably 4 times the combined value of you people. We shall do as we wish."
      It looks as though that may be the case:

      Google posts first books online

      The first works scanned and put online as part of Google's controversial print project have been unveiled.

      Included in this opening swathe are many 19th Century works of American literature and history.

      The works were chosen because they are out of copyright and unaffected by legal action that led Google to briefly halt its digitisation project.

      Groups representing authors and publishers say the project amounts to copyright infringement.

      Legal row

      Books about the US Civil War, government papers and the writings of Henry James are among the works donated by project participants for the first group of online works.

      "Today we welcome the world to our library," said Mary Sue Coleman, president of the University of Michigan, in a statement.

      "As educators we are inspired by the possibility of sharing these important works with people around the globe."

      The entire text of these works is being put online by the search giant's digitisation project. The text will be searchable and users will be able to save images of pages.

      Google has enrolled Harvard University, Stanford University, the University of Michigan, the New York Public Library and Oxford University in the digitisation project. The search giant said the first focus of the digitisation plan would be books in the public domain, so-called orphaned works and titles that have gone out of print.

      Eventually Google hopes the collection of works it will put online will dwarf this first group of works.

      The plan to put books online was unveiled a year ago but has run into legal challenges that temporarily halted the systematic scanning operation.

      The US Authors Guild along with five large publishers have gone to court to stop Google scanning copyrighted works without getting explicit permission from rights holders.

      Despite the legal challenge this week Google re-started its scanning project to put books online. As well as legal challenges Google faces competition from a similar rival plan to scan books by the Open Content Alliance which counts Microsoft, Yahoo and the Internet Archive among its backers.
      http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4403388.stm [/b]
      [/b]
      Last edited by Weeble; 03 Nov 05, 15:52. Reason: Formatting cock-up
      Andy "Weeble" Weaver

      Research, Reference and Historical Study

      Illud Latine dici non potest

      Comment


      • #4
        Google rules.

        (cases in point:

        -The subject of this thread
        -offering free wireless broadband internet to an entire city
        -scaring the heck out of Microsoft)
        “To discriminate against a thoroughly upright citizen because he belongs to some particular church, or because, like Abraham Lincoln, he has not avowed his allegiance to any church, is an outrage against that liberty of conscience which is one of the foundations of American life.”

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Overseer
          Google rules.

          (cases in point:

          -The subject of this thread
          -offering free wireless broadband internet to an entire city
          -scaring the heck out of Microsoft)
          As long as google continues to put out a good product, preferably free, I'm all for them ruling the world. They give us free services for a little advertising, so I'm there. Great research resources.
          "In mathematics you don't understand things. You just get used to them."
          - Johann von Neumann

          "Never in the face of human conflict has so much been owed by so many to so few."
          - Winston Churchill

          Comment


          • #6
            The books scanned so far, and continuing to be scanned while the legal issues with the publishers played out are one of the following:

            1. Books published prior to 1923, which apparently makes them public domain
            2. Books for which the copyright was not renewed.

            There are so many books in the libraries they are doing this at that fall into the public domain they haven't had to worry about stopping work while this stuff gets sorted out. I say more power to them. Maybe google will end up coming out with a sensible ebook format and a nice portable reader. Current ebooks are a pain to move between computer systems.
            "When they get in trouble they send for the sonsabitches." - Admiral King

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            • #7
              Microsoft's response?

              Microsoft scans British Library
              About 100,000 books in the British Library are going to be scanned and put online by software giant Microsoft.
              The books, which are out of copyright, will be digitised from 2006 and put online as part of Microsoft's book search service next year.

              Microsoft is already working with the Open Content Alliance (OCA), set up by the Internet Archive, to put an initial 150,000 works online.
              http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4402442.stm

              And:
              Microsoft and the British Library work together to make 25 million pages of content available to all
              MSN Book Search, launched earlier this month, to deliver search results.
              Microsoft continues to work with the British Library on its development of the infrastructure for the National Digital Library.

              Microsoft and the British Library today announced a strategic partnership to digitise 25 million pages of content from the Library's collections in 2006, with a long term commitment to digitise still more in the future.

              Microsoft and the British Library will work together to digitise around 100,000 out-of-copyright books and deliver search results for this content through the new MSN Book Search service help people find precisely what they're looking for on the web. MSN Search will launch an initial public beta offering next year.

              >
              >

              Microsoft is already working with the British Library to help build the digital infrastructure for the National Digital Library providing software tools, advice and technical support to the Library's experts. The National Digital Library is a cornerstone of the British Library strategy launched in June this year
              http://www.bl.uk/news/2005/pressrelease20051104.html

              http://www.bl.uk/about/strategic/digiresenv.html
              Andy "Weeble" Weaver

              Research, Reference and Historical Study

              Illud Latine dici non potest

              Comment

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