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  • Wolfe Tone
    replied
    It's interesting too, and you still see it today, how when the Celts were finally overcome by the force of Christianity, especially in Ireland with St Patrick's arrival, they still retained a lot of Celtic traditions and melded them with Christian ones. Same with the survival of the language. I think too that the Book of Kells is one of the most extraordinary and beautiful examples of the strength of that culture, that beautiful Celtic artwork surrounding the gospels.

    I think its a bit off the mark to say the Celts were overcome by Christianity.

    As for Celts that is a modern concept. To the Irish of the time of St Patrick they saw themselves as Gaelsnot Celts.

    The Book of Kells is indeed a wonderful illustration of Gaelic Art. It was probably started at Iona, a little island off the west coast of Scotland to which St Columba (Columcille) sailed in 563 AD and founded a Monastry there.

    However the Book was crafted from about the year 800 AD at Iona and then as the threat of Viking Raids increased the monks moved their main centre to Kells in County Meath.

    If your ever in Dublin you can see the book on display in the Library of Trinity College.

    Leave a comment:


  • Avalon
    replied
    Hey Paul. I know exactly where you're coming from and I admire that a great deal. That hard work really does pay off

    I remember too my first year of uni an older friend of mine got an essay of mine to read over before I handed it in. Well as it turns out she absolutely tore it to shreds with her red pen. I was indignant for about a week, then I sat down and swallowed my pride, taking on board her criticisms, which were very constructive albeit right "out there", and I re-wrote it. I handed it in, and as it turns out, I got a high distinction for it. When she read my second paper, she was amazed and full of praise for it. So it turned out to be the best thing that could have happened to me, particularly as I trusted the person that did it. My whole approach to work and essays changed after that and I ended up doing very well. (so yeah, I know what you mean. I gave up being too pedantic though.. just gave me indigestion )

    LOL, I like lavender, and sandalwood We sell the best sandalwood incense to Asia now too don't we ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Temujin
    replied
    Originally posted by Avalon
    I'm sure you'll do really well with it. Good on you for taking on a controversial topic. Let us know how you go with it.

    I noticed this site on the subject too, looks very good.
    http://coelacanth.aug.com/captbarb/
    Yeah, it should be very good for a high school paper, don't mind my comments too much, they are more for a senior level from the one you are at, getting marked for anyway. But they might help in future, at any rate, feel free to ask questions about school work if ya come up with any problems people around you can't help you with.

    If i was marking, i'd be pretty happy with it, it sets up your position well, and as it is 'research' writting, you have outlined where your diverse resaerch is going to head, and i'm guessing the rest of the paper has as much depth as you have pointed out in the intro. There's many examples like this where histrical as well as contemporary research is going to help, for extra brownie points split your historical research into east(Asia)and west, shows your thinkin outside the hum-drum box. Especially on social issues, different social outlook/practices etc.

    No, i am not doing a dip ed, i'm just a pedantic perfectionist with work, i have struggled heaps to get where i am at from where i started, the hard work has paid off, and i know through trial and error what aspects get red texta marks on. At least i used lavender, a bit of visual therapy while you read the criticisms

    Might use a nice sandalwood next time.
    Last edited by Temujin; 15 Apr 05, 02:10.

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  • Avalon
    replied
    Originally posted by Secret Agent
    Did you read those articles I posted? One addresses the issue of morale.
    In my case, I haven't yet SA but I intend to

    Leave a comment:


  • Avalon
    replied
    Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom
    Nope just a paper for my High School Research Writing Class... it was a controversial issue and thats what I picked.
    I'm sure you'll do really well with it. Good on you for taking on a controversial topic. Let us know how you go with it.

    I noticed this site on the subject too, looks very good.
    http://coelacanth.aug.com/captbarb/

    Leave a comment:


  • Secret Agent
    replied
    Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom
    In the end if a woman is physically and mentally able to perform in combat... and men can change their line of thinking about women what's going to stop her? Its just the line of thinking about how morale and such will drop... but it wouldn't if everyone is considered a soldier.
    Did you read those articles I posted? One addresses the issue of morale.

    Leave a comment:


  • Temujin
    replied
    Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom

    I don't get to implement my beliefs,
    Why not?, were you given a certain argument to follow? As long as your beliefs are in the realm of supportable evidence and stuff like that what stops you?

    Leave a comment:


  • Priest
    replied
    Good article.

    Leave a comment:


  • BarcelonaBlom
    replied
    Originally posted by Avalon
    Paul you're not doing a DipEd are you Heaven help us if you get control of a red texta LOL Your points and Richard's are really interesting.

    I was thinking about that too. Social mores are a big part of it and the other thing that comes to mind, from my own experience, is that often it's not only men who prevent women from moving through glass ceilings, assuming positions of authority, or assuming roles traditionally filled by men, but some of the time it is women. That ties in with the social mores side too, and while sure history has seen women subjugated often by structures put in place by men, women, as a powerful force in society throughout the ages, have tended to reinforce those structures, whether they be women who didn't take on mens established roles and wanted to maintain the status quo and their own power base as distinct from mens, or women who did break through, with or without a battle, but didn't want others to follow. That's not the case for the most part nowdays I don't think, but I have seen it and it has had an effect. When that happens, I see it as being about power and the gender issue as being a bit of a red herring, albeit a very real useful one in the overall sense and to those involved in the issue (ie.to take advantage of it), and it certainly can't be ignored, which is why Richard is tackling it. In fact it's vital to the evolution of modern society to understand what's at play, and indeed, what's at stake. The arguments are multifarious and multifaceted - and fascinating.

    Taboos I see as tied in with the social pressures, not just the sexual side but certainly that too. Sexuality can't be ignored as it is a primal force, but so is eating and sleeping and how badly you want to pull a trigger in any given situation. It's about discipline and self-discipline and respect. The problem arises, not unlike with that border protection issue, when the externally imposed boundaries are solid and uniform (or they too might need improving, ie.when the perception of gender difference causes external boundaries to remain unmodified.), but largely, with the sexual thing, when the internal rules differ from one individual to another. There are always people who are going to break the rules and blame it on somebody else, either because the rules allow it, or if they don't, because the individual maintains a different set of rules and values to those he or she serves under, be they societal or institutional. It is also like the school bullying issue in that it requires continual monitoring, modification, and reinforcement of the rules in order that at the end of the day you have a united and mutually supportive defence force.

    God, it's 5.30am and I need a coffee
    I agree.

    Leave a comment:


  • BarcelonaBlom
    replied
    Originally posted by Avalon
    It really sounds fascinating. Every bit of considered debate and analysis is vital. There should be more of it.

    Is it a uni paper Richard, or for a publication or for the military ?

    Nope just a paper for my High School Research Writing Class... it was a controversial issue and thats what I picked.

    Leave a comment:


  • Avalon
    replied
    It really sounds fascinating. Every bit of considered debate and analysis is vital. There should be more of it.

    Is it a uni paper Richard, or for a publication or for the military ?

    Leave a comment:


  • BarcelonaBlom
    replied
    Its written kinda historically. Thanks for the editing... kinda too late for me to implement some things though... Mainly I looked at history as a gauge of whether females can perform in combat.. and you see the ones that do great like Boudica and Lt. Pavlichenko and such and others who fail. Then I took a quick look at foreign countries (mostly their histories but an in-depth look at Canada) and then the US and policies that are being proposed by congress or people.

    In the end if a woman is physically and mentally able to perform in combat... and men can change their line of thinking about women what's going to stop her? Its just the line of thinking about how morale and such will drop... but it wouldn't if everyone is considered a soldier.

    Anyways my paper is good for the requiremnts given but I think its very weak just because 1) I don't get to implement my beliefs, 2) I was limited on size and sources.

    Leave a comment:


  • Avalon
    replied
    Paul you're not doing a DipEd are you Heaven help us if you get control of a red texta LOL Your points and Richard's are really interesting.

    I was thinking about that too. Social mores are a big part of it and the other thing that comes to mind, from my own experience, is that often it's not only men who prevent women from moving through glass ceilings, assuming positions of authority, or assuming roles traditionally filled by men, but some of the time it is women. That ties in with the social mores side too, and while sure history has seen women subjugated often by structures put in place by men, women, as a powerful force in society throughout the ages, have tended to reinforce those structures, whether they be women who didn't take on mens established roles and wanted to maintain the status quo and their own power base as distinct from mens, or women who did break through, with or without a battle, but didn't want others to follow. That's not the case for the most part nowdays I don't think, but I have seen it and it has had an effect. When that happens, I see it as being about power and the gender issue as being a bit of a red herring, albeit a very real useful one in the overall sense and to those involved in the issue (ie.to take advantage of it), and it certainly can't be ignored, which is why Richard is tackling it. In fact it's vital to the evolution of modern society to understand what's at play, and indeed, what's at stake. The arguments are multifarious and multifaceted - and fascinating.

    Taboos I see as tied in with the social pressures, not just the sexual side but certainly that too. Sexuality can't be ignored as it is a primal force, but so is eating and sleeping and how badly you want to pull a trigger in any given situation. It's about discipline and self-discipline and respect. The problem arises, not unlike with that border protection issue, when the externally imposed boundaries are solid and uniform (or they too might need improving, ie.when the perception of gender difference causes external boundaries to remain unmodified.), but largely, with the sexual thing, when the internal rules differ from one individual to another. There are always people who are going to break the rules and blame it on somebody else, either because the rules allow it, or if they don't, because the individual maintains a different set of rules and values to those he or she serves under, be they societal or institutional. It is also like the school bullying issue in that it requires continual monitoring, modification, and reinforcement of the rules in order that at the end of the day you have a united and mutually supportive defence force.

    God, it's 5.30am and I need a coffee

    Leave a comment:


  • Temujin
    replied
    Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom
    A taste of my paper... the Intro:

    The chivalrous,i think 'masculine' is a better word for your purposes or even possibly male, image of women is that they are helpless “creatures” that need protection afforded by strong men. This image has been maintained through historyI'd define it to 'western' history, covers europe and new world, covers your but if your marker is a history buff on amazons or something like that.. This seems to have become intrinsic to the modern age woman as well, and as contributed to a large issue that affects both men and women: Can women perform and participate in combat? Women have been this is hypocritical of the 'through history' bit, maybe need to refine and define your statements and argument moreand are capable of tactically fighting wars as well as strategically organizing them; this stays truemore countering of your previous statements throughout history, and the modern ages, both in the United States and foreignthats not very good practice in history or any field, the use of 'foreign' countries. But it seems that the biggest problem for women to make their way into combat units is the breaking of male and female taboos does that mean they should be promiscuous?which requires effort from “both sides of the fence.”

    I added some comments in the text, hope its helpfull.

    Also, what is your argument? Are you going to bring in social mores and show how this follows them into the service and is hard to break from? your intro just says, yes they can fight, but both sexes need to adapt. Thats ok, but the social aspect needs to be looked at and discussed, otherwise your argument might look weak, someone might say, 'well its just human nature that they will play up', which is bull of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • Avalon
    replied
    Richard, your intro is excellent. I'm intrigued. The idea of taboos is a great one to explore, and the nature and structure of those barriers.. where they arise from (definately both sides)how they can be broken down.. indeed if some of them should or shouldn't be broken down. Well I hope you can share more of it at some stage. I would certainly like to read it one day when you are finished !

    I still have to dig out my Celtic books and add some more thoughts to what you were saying too Paul as you raise so many interesting points. I shall return

    Leave a comment:

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