Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Benevolent Dictators

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Benevolent Dictators

    Have there been any?

    I remember the term 'benevolent dictator' from my youth but can't remember where I heard it, what/who it referred to, or where it originated.

    Anyone know?

    However, I've always kind of thought, "Yeah, I could see how that could work to the benefit of a country - if the man was truly of a kindly disposition while at the same time being all-powerful."

    But running several times through the names of all the dictators throughout history that I can remember, I can't really think of anyone who fits the bill.

    Can you?

    How about one who was wasn't totally destructive and 'orrible as nearly all of them seem to have been. Perhaps someone who could be described (in Monty Python's phrase) as: "Yeah, he was cruel... cruel but fair."

    Perhaps Ashoka after he gave up conquering all of India and took up Buddhism, or maybe Fidel Casto who, while being a dictator wasn't massively destructive (apart from that bringing humanity to the brink of nuclear holocaust thingie - not entirely his fault).

    So how about it? Any candidates for Benevolent Dictator, or at least a dictator who wasn't as thoroughly rotten and destructive as the rest of them?


    Philip
    Last edited by PhilipLaos; 04 Jul 14, 23:38.
    "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

  • #2
    Try the chap what ran Portugal around the same time as France - don't recall the name and must dash, but he seems to have been the least bad, at least, of the motley crew of dictators. There have been a number of autocrats which may fit the descriptor dictator who were quite good - Alfred the Great springs to mind.
    ------
    'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

    If you have questions about the forum please check the FAQ/Rules

    Comment


    • #3
      Do you mean Salazar?

      Pruitt
      Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

      Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

      by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

      Comment


      • #4
        Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus
        Кто там?
        Это я - Почтальон Печкин!
        Tunis is a Carthigenian city!

        Comment


        • #5
          Napoleon Bonaparte.

          He actually introduce a number of civil reforms that live on today, most importantly the Civil Code.
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napoleon#Reforms

          The Civil Code was more important to humanity than all of his military conquests.
          Battles are dangerous affairs... Wang Hsi

          Comment


          • #6
            Pretty short thread...
            Battles are dangerous affairs... Wang Hsi

            Comment


            • #7
              Octavian, I do like his method of pretending to just be "first among equals". Napoleon might have benefited from following his example.
              "A foe who had fought so long and valiantly, and had suffered so much for a cause, though that cause was, I believe, one of the worst for which a people ever fought, and one for which there was the least excuse." Ulysses S. Grant

              Comment

              Latest Topics

              Collapse

              Working...
              X