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Hard Lesson to Learn

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  • Hard Lesson to Learn

    I found out what happens when you shoot lacquer gloss over an acrylic paint job. Looks like I get to shoot my base coat over again.... Now I know why I don't build cars.
    If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

  • #2
    Lacquer over acrylic? That's a bold move!! I use automotive lacquer clear coats on the cars and found it works fine over enamels and other lacquers. I've never tried it over acrylics, but would give it a shot (pun intended!)with a low temp thinner, on a scrap model or something.
    Ham
    Semper Fi
    Doug

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    • #3
      Never use gloss coats....but I feel your pain Scott...
      Now it's ten years later but he still keeps up the fight
      In Ireland, in Lebanon, in Palestine and Berkeley
      Patty Hearst heard the burst of Roland's Thompson gun and bought it

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      • #4
        Originally posted by hamy3 View Post
        Lacquer over acrylic? That's a bold move!! I use automotive lacquer clear coats on the cars and found it works fine over enamels and other lacquers. I've never tried it over acrylics, but would give it a shot (pun intended!)with a low temp thinner, on a scrap model or something.
        Ham
        Too bold. I write it off to inexperience and trying something new. I have acrylic gloss but thought the acrylic would be 'glossier'. I'm painting a remote control truck body for a buddy. Never ask an armor modeller to make something look new!

        Originally posted by panzermacher View Post
        Never use gloss coats....but I feel your pain Scott...
        Me either, live and learn.
        If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by freightshaker View Post
          Too bold. I write it off to inexperience and trying something new. I have acrylic gloss but thought the acrylic would be 'glossier'. I'm painting a remote control truck body for a buddy. Never ask an armor modeller to make something look new!



          Me either, live and learn.
          G'day Scott,
          I have R/C Cars and I painted their bodies (Shells) myself.

          Just a couple of questions mate,

          Was the Truck's shell you painted brand new?
          and if it was new, was it made of clear plastic?

          The reason I ask is when you buy a new shell, it is made of clear Polycarbonate Plastic.
          All the painting is to be done only on the inside of the shell.
          The outside remains clean, clear and glossy with the paint showing through it from the inside out and it just looks like its painted on the outside.
          (Also good coz scraps and crashes dont take the paint off when its painted on the inside.)


          Usually when you paint R/C Vehicle shells, you use Polycarbonate Paint.
          (Polycarbonate paint doesn't "flake" and fall off if the plastic bends or is flexed like other paints will do.)


          Cheers,
          Dave
          Roger, I see them. Attacking now

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Aussie Dave View Post
            G'day Scott,
            I have R/C Cars and I painted their bodies (Shells) myself.

            Just a couple of questions mate,

            Was the Truck's shell you painted brand new?
            and if it was new, was it made of clear plastic?

            The reason I ask is when you buy a new shell, it is made of clear Polycarbonate Plastic.
            All the painting is to be done only on the inside of the shell.
            The outside remains clean, clear and glossy with the paint showing through it from the inside out and it just looks like its painted on the outside.
            (Also good coz scraps and crashes dont take the paint off when its painted on the inside.)


            Usually when you paint R/C Vehicle shells, you use Polycarbonate Paint.
            (Polycarbonate paint doesn't "flake" and fall off if the plastic bends or is flexed like other paints will do.)


            Cheers,
            Dave
            Nah, it's just a cheap 1/32nd scale truck body but he wants it to look like his actual pick up. I'm going to try and reshoot it today, I have just enough aluminum paint to do it. This is it before I shot the base coat.

            If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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            • #7
              My GOD that's blue. How's that Samurai coming along Freight?
              The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
              Sideshow Bob.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Geek44 View Post
                My GOD that's blue. How's that Samurai coming along Freight?
                The blue the original finish. I shot it in Aluminum. The Samurai has taken some missteps but I've resumed work on it. I decided to strip it and ,being the impatient person I can be, decided to accelerate the process by using Acetone . It didn't melt the resin as bad as you would think and I didn't lose any detail but the helmet ornament won't be going on the model and I still had to use a Dremel to get the primer off. Two lessons learned lately; don't use Testor's rattle-can primer (too thick) or gloss coat (lacquer over acrylic is a no-no). It's not worth the effort. I've started on the flesh tone again but using acrylic this time. So far, so good.
                If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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                • #9
                  If the use of acetone was 'impatient', what do you usually use to strip paint? I've only ever done it once ( I prefer to start again with a new kit ) and I used a purpose bought product that worked a treat. I can't remember what it was called but I never once thought about it damaging the model and it didn't.
                  That blue looks like every Subaru WRX I've ever seen. =)
                  The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
                  Sideshow Bob.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Geek44 View Post
                    If the use of acetone was 'impatient', what do you usually use to strip paint? I've only ever done it once ( I prefer to start again with a new kit ) and I used a purpose bought product that worked a treat. I can't remember what it was called but I never once thought about it damaging the model and it didn't.
                    That blue looks like every Subaru WRX I've ever seen. =)
                    Normally I'd use regular thinner and a toothbrush. I usually use acetone to clean my airbrush.
                    If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Geek44 View Post
                      That blue looks like every Subaru WRX I've ever seen. =)
                      You mean like this one.




                      Or is it a Holden "Maloo" blue?




                      Cheers,
                      Dave
                      Roger, I see them. Attacking now

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It's more WRX to me Dave. Glad to see you around too mate...hope the family is doing well.
                        Freight, the product I used is called 'Easy Lift Off' or just 'ELO' by Polly S. It cost me around $20 Aussie for 8 Fl. Oz. or 236 ml. It comes in a metal bottle with a tan and white label. The directions (which I followed) say to paint the stuff all over the surface, in my case an entire Panther G in 1/35, and leave it for enough time for the paint to 'crinkle'. I did this and left the model in a steel baking tray for about 20 minutes. The paint mostly just rinsed off with tepid water. There were a few stubborn areas where I reapplied the stuff and scrubbed the paint off with an old toothbrush. The model had been brush painted with Humbrol enamel. The ELO worked like a charm.
                        The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
                        Sideshow Bob.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sounds like some great stuff. I thought about using brake fluid but just couldn't bring myself to do it
                          If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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                          • #14
                            Crikey! Brake fluid?!?! When I was younger, people used to talk about pouring brake fluid on cars as a method of vandalism/mischief-making/revenge etc. If it destroys the paint work on real cars, one can only imagine what it would do to a model.
                            The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
                            Sideshow Bob.

                            Comment

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