Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

B-52H Progress

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • B-52H Progress

    I have just about all the parts glued. Letting the exhaust nozzles dry before gluing the engine pods and all gluing will be complete.
    1st photo is the putty I placed to fill some gaps. I have a feeling I should have just did the entire top for a more even distribution, plus I should use something other then my finger to spread it(im sure you folks can recommend a better tool). On a positive note at least I can reapply and re-sand.

    Compressors with silver tips ad burnt steel turbines. Im actually impressy impressed with the job I did with these. Pretty good detail, although my crappy camera doesnt show full detail.

    A better digital camera would shot the quality detail I did with the exhaust nozzles. I thought gluing these tiny pieces to the engine pod would be the hardest task, but was actually the easiest...simply drop of glue placing with tweezers. So far a great learning experience and learning so much.

  • #2
    You can mask off areas where you DON'T want putty with masking tape as you would with paint. That way, you just get it on the seam and don't risk damaging any moulded on detail like panel lines. As you say, you can always sand it back and re-apply it...I usually do that a couple of times. I try to get away with as little putty as possible. Your finger is a perfectly acceptable way of applying putty...some might say the best because you can feel what you're doing as well as see. I personally use Milliput. It's a two part epoxy putty that comes in two sausages that have the consistency of cold blu-tack. You mix equal parts but the beauty is that it's water soluble. You can make it any consistency you need by adding water. You can also fill your gap, then 'wash' away the excess with a wet finger. It's also easy to wash out of recessed detail before it cures. It comes in three 'grades' but I only use the white superfine stuff. It also polishes up nicely for any natural metal projects too.
    The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
    Sideshow Bob.

    Comment


    • #3
      I often use a toothpick to apply putty. Or an exacto knife. Then I wipe away the excess with a damp paper towel.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll apply putty with a spatula and smooth/blend it in using a brush dipped in liquid cement.
        If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by freightshaker View Post
          I'll apply putty with a spatula and smooth/blend it in using a brush dipped in liquid cement.
          Excellent tip mate...funny how you pick stuff up huh? I've used liquid glue thinned Tamiya putty for other things but never made the above connection myself. Cheers.
          The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
          Sideshow Bob.

          Comment


          • #6
            well I sanded along the top of the fusalage and where the wings meet.
            Another disaster...
            Along the top went great with sanding and spraying some gunship gray. WOuld have been perfect if I would have stopped there. BUT one of the wings where meeting with the fusalage....
            While one wing looked perfectly connected with the fusalage the other was stubborn. Even after sanding there still was a gap, but stupidly figured I would just spray more paint to fill in. Worst, dumbest, crap-head mistake I made so far.
            Wayyy too much paint....and too make you experts puke even more....I tried to wipe excess with a paper towel!
            I did continue to wipe excess but will wait a few days, sand paint, reapply putty, and do this all over again.
            Too bad Im fin' up such a great aircraft. I hope no one from Minot or Barksdale is reading this.
            Anyway I feel good just feeling that I do not in, any way, want to give up on this. Just keep learning along the way and learning from these mistakes.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by usaalways View Post
              Too bad Im fin' up such a great aircraft. I hope no one from Minot or Barksdale is reading this.
              I did grow up 40 miles from Grand Forks AFB. They use to practice bombing runs on our town. They'd come in so low the windows would rattle.

              Don't quit, unless your tired of the model. Once it ceases to be fun there is no point to it. Paint can be removed a number of ways depending on type of paint. Acrylic can usually be removed by any ammonia based window cleaner like windex. Brake fluid and Simple Green (I've degreased an engine block with Simple Green) also work. Enamel is trickier. Thinner will work, as will acetone and turpentine. The trick is that these products will also melt plastic and craze windshields so application and removal has to be quick.

              Like I said, when it gets tiring and frustrating it's time to quit and start something else. You can always put the model away, start something new, and then come back to it later.
              If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yup, don't worry about it. Give it a few days to set, then sand and paint. As long as you are learning and enjoying. I've only finished 16 models. I have probably thrown half that number in the bin.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sorry usaalways...I had to laugh a little. Not because I think you're a dope but because your plight brought back some memories for me. It also occurs to me that you're at a slight disadvantage here. My Dad, while not the greatest modeller, still had some basic skills and his job kinda crossed over a little. If I had a problem or was stuck, I could always ask him. You have to post here, then wait for a response, sometimes sift through several answers and then do what you think is best...can't be easy mate and I admire your tenacity. Sometimes, learning is finding out what NOT to do as well as what to do. Two more things. Freight is absolutely right. Don't model frustrated. If it's not fun anymore, go read a book. Second, don't be afraid to mess a few kits up. I've been modelling for almost 35 years and I still have my disasters sometimes. Learning new stuff sometimes requires sacrifice...in my case, cheap, experiment or 'study' kits.
                  Good luck, I think you're doing fine for a first go mate.
                  The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
                  Sideshow Bob.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Geek is absolutely right...I have many projects that I have been tempted to toss at the wall. It is a mental game as well as physical......Remember the mistakes and dont make em a 2nd time around. I comes with the territory...You cant expect model number 1 to look like a picture in FINESCALE Magazine....It takes time and practice...I didnt sit down and ply "Inna-Gadda-Davida" First time at my Drum set...but with time I learned the whole Drum solo... Same as modeling, and painting...I been at it over 36 years now (I was about 6 or 7 when the bug bit me) and i never had a soul to ask anything...everything I know now, I learned on my own and by studying other modelers. Now with this forum...You have the opportunity alot of us older guys never had...a chance to ask "Pros" how to do things.
                    And remember Frustration IS part of the game...I just wasted 5 or so Hours tonight trying to paint a guitar the way I wanted but I still aint happy with it.

                    And I learned to walk away....take a hour or so...Rethink the process, or just read or watch TV...and relax. after that you can come back to what ever was bothering you with a new approach and better attitude. Modeling while angry or frustrated is a bad thing to get into. (Although I work better under pressure!)

                    Enjoy and listen to what us older modelers have to say......use the advice that works for you...or discover you OWN processes.
                    Now it's ten years later but he still keeps up the fight
                    In Ireland, in Lebanon, in Palestine and Berkeley
                    Patty Hearst heard the burst of Roland's Thompson gun and bought it

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanx guys for your responses.
                      It is frustrating but certainly not enough to toss this 1st project...no way!
                      This plane will be built one way or another. Final reapplying of putty is dried and will be sanded, then painted and will stay as is.
                      The bottom is even worse then the top! Like I mentioned I will not be using landing gear for this one, and getting the doors to fit perfectly closed is extemely hard. BUT will make the best of it and finish soon.
                      I look on the bright side....I can use this as a tool. I will compare this one to all my future bombers and will show my progression in skill. My next one is another B-52H bomber( with camoflouge ), so i get another shot with the greatest aircraft ever built!
                      Plus with this board I am confident I can always get great info...like If I do screw up landing grear I know now from this baord that its not too late to use it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Old junk kits make great testing grounds for new technics and paint jobs. Everyone has them.
                        If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Always keep old parts too...even if you think they're written off. You never know when you may need a spare or even when old parts can be changed or modified for a totally different use. As a hypothetical example, a 1/72 B-52 mainwheel might make an acceptable tail wheel on a larger scale kit should you lose the original (it happens all too often...one day I'll shake out my rug and find three full kits in it ). Love your spirit usaalways...a lesser modeller would have chucked it and bought a new one.
                          The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
                          Sideshow Bob.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Check out the news today about the B52 and the missing nukes. I'm thinking you should just mount 5 ACMs on your B52.
                            As lord and master of your grill, you will welcome any opportunity to display your grilling prowess.
                            Mario Batali, 2006

                            Comment

                            Latest Topics

                            Collapse

                            Working...
                            X