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  • Drying time for paint

    I saw from replies here, and instructions in my kit, that the suggested waiting time for paint to dry is 48 hrs.
    Does anyone continue is less time? Im really anxious to get this done.

  • #2
    Originally posted by usaalways View Post
    I saw from replies here, and instructions in my kit, that the suggested waiting time for paint to dry is 48 hrs.
    Does anyone continue is less time? Im really anxious to get this done.
    That totally depends on what type of paint you are using.
    Acrylics dry faster that Enamels for instance, but as a rule 24 hours is a long enough drying time to continue working on your model.

    I will often wait only 12 hours before painting again depending on what part it is and how much paint was applied beforehand.

    What I think they mean is curing time (To dry completely and harden), Acrylics cure properly in about 48 hours and Enamels can take up to a week for them to finish curing.
    (I can give you advice on Enamel paint, because thats what I prefer to use but you will have to ask the others advice here about using Acrylics.)

    Spray painting also lessens the drying time as its thinned out paint and thinners drys very quickly compared to the paint itself, this is because it contains more thinner than paint and also not as thick a coat is applied when spray painting.

    I know its hard sometimes to wait but try to remember mate, if you rush things or try to cut corners, disaster is sure to be waiting for you around the bend.

    Successful model building requires patience and as the saying goes "Rome wasn't built in a day"



    Cheers,
    Dave

    ps. If you want something to do while waiting for the paint to dry, start doing a bit of painting on your next model like its wheels or internal parts to pass the time
    But again, take your time and do it right the first time.
    Roger, I see them. Attacking now

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    • #3
      Well put Dave.
      The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
      Sideshow Bob.

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      • #4
        Depends entirely on type of paint, gloss or matt and means of application.

        An airbrushed matt is generally dry in 5 minutes time. Which is why it's cool to use an airbrush.

        Spray cans dump so much paint so fast, it's not really the same.

        Gloss coats, you apply it, set it down, and that's it for the day period.
        Life is change. Built models for decades.
        Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
        I didn't for a long time either.

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        • #5
          My Rule of thumb 12 to 24 on Acrylics.......For Full cure.....in a good dry house.....If its humid a little longer Oils....Back when I USED to use em...48 hours....Some things can be worked on hours after painting But for Like an over the whole model spray job...I let em set about a day before touching them.
          Now it's ten years later but he still keeps up the fight
          In Ireland, in Lebanon, in Palestine and Berkeley
          Patty Hearst heard the burst of Roland's Thompson gun and bought it

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          • #6
            There are some pretty good answers found above this one, and I'll add that Gloss and Metallics take a good deal longer than flat colors in enamal to dry. I usually wait at least a week before working with anything glossy, or metallic. I've found that gloss coats will still fingerprint three or even four days after application. This is also true for gloss clear coats.
            Another area that effects drying time are the thinners used to cut the paint. For enamels, and lacquers I like to use lacquer thinner, the type available at paint supply and hardware stores. This speeds the drying time considerably, and also give the paint a little tooth to grab the surface underneath. Mineral spirits need longer to evaporate, hence longer drying and curing times are the norm.
            Automotive lacquers are a differant animal alltogether, and require the use of thinners manufactured specifially for the brand being used. Drying agents are available, but consult with your dealer when choosing products.
            Another painting trick is the use of Japan Dryer to speed drying times. This is great for enamels and lacquers, but don't use it for acrylics. It isn't compatable. I also mix a small amount in with artist oil paints to speed their drying time considerably. But it's wise to remember, a little goes a long way!!!
            The reason airbrushing speeds the drying time is that the paint is applied in much thinner coats that what ca be achived by brush, or spray can. Thinner coats means less (paint) thinner to evaporate!!
            Semper Fi
            Doug

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            • #7
              Been a while, but yes, forgot about metallics, they can indeed be slow as hell.

              It can also be dependent on the surface of what was painted too. I have found, that if the substance painted is even remotely not hard and non porous, that gloss and metallic can take almost indefinitely to cure.

              But it should also be mentioned, each colour is a combination of a variety of susbtances used to actually make the colour. Not all colours are created equally. You will find some colours will behave uniquely sometimes as well.
              Life is change. Built models for decades.
              Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
              I didn't for a long time either.

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              • #8
                Mealizers, as opposed to metallic paint, dry very quickly...say within an hour. The problem with those is that they are never okay to touch unless you get some kind of clear coat over them. They're kinda like newsprint and are almost impossible to mask...they're a skill unto themselves and something I've really only dabbled with.
                The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
                Sideshow Bob.

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                • #9
                  I don't like the way the Metalizer line looks with a top coat. They look awesome when shot through an airbrush, and buff up very nicely. I've used S&J polishing powder and a gold tinted buffing powder to buff them to a good shine, but have had to be careful not to buff right through the finish!! Another shot restores the finish, so I don't unmask the surrounding surface until it's right. You still can't handle it though!!
                  Semper Fi
                  Doug

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hamy3 View Post
                    I don't like the way the Metalizer line looks with a top coat. They look awesome when shot through an airbrush, and buff up very nicely. I've used S&J polishing powder and a gold tinted buffing powder to buff them to a good shine, but have had to be careful not to buff right through the finish!! Another shot restores the finish, so I don't unmask the surrounding surface until it's right. You still can't handle it though!!
                    I guess this is why they say natural metal is the hardest finish to perfect. I've never used (or seen for that matter) S&J but I've read plenty of favourable things about it. I have one by Gunze Sangyo (I think) called Mr. Metalcote...they also do Mr. Marksofter (not a typo) and a whole lot of other stuff called Mr. something. I've only ever used it as a base for paint that I've then stressed out pretty badly. Lots of chips and scratches. It looks good if it's not the main colour...I actually have two...buffing and non. Only used the non-buffing so far. Of course the king of metalizers (according to the pundits) is Alclad II of which I have three shades but haven't used yet. They have to be sprayed over a gloss undercoat, either black or grey depending on the shade. In the magazines it looks exactly like aluminium or iron or whatever the shade is...it's awesome. It's the polishing of the whole model to a sheen before applying these things that defeats most attempts. They really bring out any flaws or gaps that have been overlooked. It's on my 'to try' list but not soon. I would want to practice on a cheap kit first.
                    The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
                    Sideshow Bob.

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                    • #11
                      I used the Alclad on an F-84-C that went to an ANG unit's history display. The finish developed small cracks, all over the place, and looked terrible. I wound up touching it up with Metalizer and a brush, of all things!! (And they say you can't brush the stuff!!!) I had to turn the bottle upside down and let all the pigments hit the cap, then work as quickly as I could to get it in the cracks. It took a few times of turning the bottle over, but after a light buffing, looked fine.
                      I'm going to try the Alclad again sometime, on something that won't be going anyplace when it's done!!
                      I don't like doing metal finishes anymore than I have to!!
                      Semper Fi
                      Doug

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                      • #12
                        Well this is the first negative thing I've read about it. We had a guy who used to post here who took part in our first build. He did a North Korean Mig 15 and used the Alclad and it looked awesome. He was really casual about it too...I wonder if it may have been a humidity thing or something like that in your case. I'm just guessing...you may have had a dud batch or something.
                        Yep, aluminium finish is very difficult but also something I hope to conquer. I hate the idea of a 'finish' intimidating me into 'buying a different kit'. I 'll be practicing on cheap 'study' kits first though. I'm actually a member of a club here and we have a raffle every month. If I get the chance, I hope to win a kit I can practice on. They had Tamiya's 1/48 P-51 this week but of course I didn't win anything (again ).
                        Quite interested in your ironclads mate. I haven't built a ship in decades but would like to try one again...who produces the kits you get and what are they made of eg. styrene, resin etc. I know Verlinden does one but I'm not knowledgeable in Civil War history so I can't be more specific...but all that wood and iron...what a fantastic look and contrast.
                        Peace
                        The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
                        Sideshow Bob.

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                        • #13
                          I'm not exactly sure what happened to the Alclad to make it crack. I spoke to the fellow that makes it, and it mystified him as well. I used Tamiya as an undercoat, and suspect that may have been a contributing factor, but I don't know for certain.
                          The Nashville is a Verlinden kit, one of the many Ironclads he produces. His line is resin in 1/200 scale, which makes Nashville about 20" long. There isn't any photo etched parts, and the instructions are very basic. But there's a lot of room for extra detailing. The castings are very crisp, and they're pretty easy to build. They're all waterline models so that limits the display possibilities somewhat. And some of the detail areas are "historically suspect"!! This could be quite extensive, depending on how accurate you'd like it to be. But they look good basically as is.
                          The CSS Chirora I'm working on currently is from Flagship Models. It's also resin and in 1/196 scale, which is a more common ship scale at 1/16"=1'. His instructions are better, and is a more complete kit with P/E, cast white metal, and a sheet of flags. It has the option of builting it as a full hull, which I'm doing to mine. It's also very well cast, and should look good whith all he rigging. I have some great referances for these types of ships, so I should have no excuses for screwing it into the ground!!!!!
                          Semper Fi
                          Doug

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by hamy3 View Post
                            I'm not exactly sure what happened to the Alclad to make it crack. I spoke to the fellow that makes it, and it mystified him as well. I used Tamiya as an undercoat, and suspect that may have been a contributing factor, but I don't know for certain.
                            The Nashville is a Verlinden kit, one of the many Ironclads he produces. His line is resin in 1/200 scale, which makes Nashville about 20" long. There isn't any photo etched parts, and the instructions are very basic. But there's a lot of room for extra detailing. The castings are very crisp, and they're pretty easy to build. They're all waterline models so that limits the display possibilities somewhat. And some of the detail areas are "historically suspect"!! This could be quite extensive, depending on how accurate you'd like it to be. But they look good basically as is.
                            The CSS Chirora I'm working on currently is from Flagship Models. It's also resin and in 1/196 scale, which is a more common ship scale at 1/16"=1'. His instructions are better, and is a more complete kit with P/E, cast white metal, and a sheet of flags. It has the option of builting it as a full hull, which I'm doing to mine. It's also very well cast, and should look good whith all he rigging. I have some great referances for these types of ships, so I should have no excuses for screwing it into the ground!!!!!
                            Thanks mate...that's exactly what I wanted and I appreciate your time. I knew Verlinden did at least one ironclad...but I didn't know he had a range. There is a guy in our club that ONLY builds ships and he does them beautifully...I've only been to three meetings so I only spoke to this guy briefly last meeting. He does resin waterline kits that he buys off the net...he mentioned the name of the site and it may have been Flagship stuff...I'll be asking again because from what I've seen of both his and your ships, they make beautiful models and I wanna get me one. The guy in our club is currently building some really obscure WW1 British battleship in 1/4,000,000 or something . It's half done but already looks awesome.
                            Thanks hamy3.
                            The truth? You can't handle the truth! No truth handler you! I deride your truth handling abilities!
                            Sideshow Bob.

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                            • #15
                              Try these three sites. They may have something that interests you!!
                              http://www.flagshipmodels.com/flagship/index.html
                              http://www.milminwh.com/scale_models.htm
                              http://www.cottage-industry-models.com/index.html
                              Semper Fi
                              Doug

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