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Wing Chun vs Krav Maga

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  • Wing Chun vs Krav Maga

    I've decided to start taking martial arts, but I still haven't decided which I want to take. I've narrowed it down to Wing Chun and Krav Maga. Though I will still consider other options.

    I want to train in a martial art that is effective in real fight scenarios. I am not at all interested in the philosophical or religious aspect of MA. I want to become powerful and deadly and to be able to defend myself if I ever needed to.

    Most MA seem to be sport rather then real life fighting. Most of the fancy moves you learn can only be used in ideal situations that would never surface in real life. I took taekwondo for a brief time when I was in middle school and it was basically kiddie stuff. Most of the people in the class were out of shape adolescents who were addicted to manga and anime. I know people who have been taking taekwondo and other forms of MA for years and they would still lose to almost anyone if they got in a fight.

    A lot of people have said that boxing is the most useful for real fight scenarios, because it is raw fighting. But I don't think I'm ready for boxing. I haven't exercised in months and I'm pretty weak. I want to start by taking a MA where the students are closer to my level and then consider moving on to a more advanced MA once I get in better shape.

    Tl;dr - I need help deciding which MA to take. I want to do the one that is most effective in real life fight scenarios.

  • #2
    The answer isn't which school the fighter has studied, but how good the fighter is.

    There isn't really one art that is superior to all others, it mostly comes down to the person in the fight and how well they can apply the lessons learned to the situation.

    So my recommendation is go with whichever one has movements and techniques that feel natural and easy to you. That's the one you're going to pick up and master faster and be best able to apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree, but different MA specialize in certain things ie offense, defense, stealth, close combat, etc.

      I want to train in the one that would be most effective in real life fight scenarios. I don't want to take one that is mostly sport.

      Comment


      • #4
        Don't know wing chun, but the main feature of Krav Maga is real life effectiveness, though I assume MMA would also fit.

        I'll try to get rogg to replay, he does both Krab Maga and MMA (and some other stuff), he'll have more input.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Golani View Post
          Don't know wing chun, but the main feature of Krav Maga is real life effectiveness, though I assume MMA would also fit.

          I'll try to get rogg to replay, he does both Krab Maga and MMA (and some other stuff), he'll have more input.
          Here I am

          I haven't exercised in months and I'm pretty weak. I want to start by taking a MA where the students are closer to my level and then consider moving on to a more advanced MA once I get in better shape.
          In my opinion it is always good to train with "experts", because you learn more and quicker.....

          When you choose a good training center they should put you in a class which fits to your training level....

          If they do not.... go away!

          I started to train Krav Maga about 2 years ago, did a little bit of boxing and started to train MMA for a while, so I am far from being an expert but my opinion is, that the best way to learn fighting is to fight, so you should be prepared to endure some pain....



          Uploaded with ImageShack.us

          This is my arm after a training session...

          I am also more for the practical way and I am not very interested in the far east "fighting" philosophy.

          Many modern armed forces use Krav Maga, so it is probably one of the best ways to learn self defense.

          Krav Maga is however divided into several clubs, organizations, etc, so there is no overall, worldwide organization which teaches homogeneous techniques....

          I hope I could help a bit

          By the way, I recommend to go to a gym besides your fighting training....

          When you look like a bulldog most people won`t try to test your fighting skills...
          "Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier" - Samuel Johnson

          "Kerls, wollt ihr denn ewig leben?"

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by rogg View Post
            Here I am



            In my opinion it is always good to train with "experts", because you learn more and quicker.....

            When you choose a good training center they should put you in a class which fits to your training level....

            If they do not.... go away!

            I started to train Krav Maga about 2 years ago, did a little bit of boxing and started to train MMA for a while, so I am far from being an expert but my opinion is, that the best way to learn fighting is to fight, so you should be prepared to endure some pain....



            Uploaded with ImageShack.us

            This is my arm after a training session...
            I agree with all of this. If the school does not offer you a chance to get punched, it is worthless. You are learning more to dance than to fight. You need to know what a punch feels like so you will learn not to get punched. Nothing is going to throw you off your game like getting socked in the nose. It hurts, disorients you, the blood concerns you, and to top it all off, your eyes are watering and you can't see very well. Better to get hit by a buddy than someone who really wants to hurt you.

            Wing Chun is a form of Kung Fu. I don't know much about it, other than if I recall correctly is somewhat similar to Southern Praying Mantis which I do know a little about. I like the Kung Fu styles more than others, but that may be because that is what I was learning. I know people in other styles, and they are all devastatingly effective.
            "The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made."
            Groucho Marx

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            • #7
              I would recommend you take a look at Aikido.. my daughter originally wanted to study thai kickboxing because all the kicking and punching looked cool, I suspect... anyway, she quickly got hooked on the discipline and precision and grace found in Aikido.. her sessions can get very intense and physical .. I feel reassured knowing she's better able to defend herself.

              Comment


              • #8
                My organization offers Krav Maga training once or twice a month and I try to take advantage of it. It is very practical and focused on direct action as well as avoiding takedowns and some ground fighting so far as I've experienced. I hear MMA and BJJ are also good an those respects. Someone did mention to me that BJJ is very ground fighting oriented, which may be good one on one, but not so good when facing multiple people.

                I took Aikido for many years and loved it, but I would say that it has a long learning curve before it has practical use. But I would recommend NEVER messing with a long time Aikido sensei. When you combine the spiritual with the physical it takes the art to a whole new level.
                TTFN

                Comment


                • #9
                  I won't go into a discussion as to which is better.

                  But KG has a point - it is the learning curve which is the issue here. If you just want to pick up basic skills that will help you to survive dangerous situations, then Krav Maga is a good start.

                  Wing Chun, when practiced by a master, is devastatingly effective as a self-defense system, but it takes quite a bit longer to learn.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've not studied Krav Maga but have worked out with an instructor of Wing Chun in another school. He was very good. It also helped he was a 6' 4" and 250. Very formidable.

                    In my experience every school brings something for you to learn. None is decisively superior to another; each brings strengths and weaknesses.

                    For your initial school, my advice is to go somewhere you're comfortable.

                    While I agree that a school where you don't have contact isn't worth too much, don't join some school full of bad @$$es just because we told you to. Look at the students: are they happy? healthy? full of themselves or modest?

                    Go someplace where you feel like you'll fit in. Have fun. It will take years before you'll really be competent enough to do much. Enjoy the ride, and be prepared to study for the long term.
                    RPG Wisdom: There is nothing more exhilarating than having an opponent roll to hit without result.

                    Warhammer 40K Wisdom: Heresy grows from buggy servers.

                    Try to learn the difference between prudence and paranoia.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by kuma View Post
                      I would recommend you take a look at Aikido.. my daughter originally wanted to study thai kickboxing because all the kicking and punching looked cool, I suspect... anyway, she quickly got hooked on the discipline and precision and grace found in Aikido.. her sessions can get very intense and physical .. I feel reassured knowing she's better able to defend herself.
                      You're in the Philippines and you're recommending Aikido?

                      Man, I'd be looking for some good Escrima and Arnisadors!

                      I like Aikido and all, but, man...those archipelago arts are...effective.
                      RPG Wisdom: There is nothing more exhilarating than having an opponent roll to hit without result.

                      Warhammer 40K Wisdom: Heresy grows from buggy servers.

                      Try to learn the difference between prudence and paranoia.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by LongBlade View Post
                        You're in the Philippines and you're recommending Aikido?

                        Man, I'd be looking for some good Escrima and Arnisadors!

                        I like Aikido and all, but, man...those archipelago arts are...effective.
                        Its a hassle walking around with arnis sticks or knives .. she's the sensei's pet because she's such a diligent student and is now working on her brown belt. It will serve her well in all but the most extreme cases in w/c case she should probably get a gun.. in no other martial art is such care taken not to unduly harm one's opponent.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I carpool with a semi-pro MMA fighter... Really, I do! This guy and the people he trains with have good reason to say they can tie most other martial arts style fighters into a knot and make them lick their privates.
                          I've seen this guy show up for work looking like 40 miles of road rash from workouts. I have no desire to do what he does but I buy what he says. Those guys do turn opponets into hamburger.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Speaking of Escrima and Arnis, not to mention Penchak Silat ...

                            Erich, I suggest you take a look at a guy called Michael Janich. He has some videos on unarmed combatives, the use of knives for self-defence, etc. His system was developed base on his experiences with Escrima, Arnis, Penchak Silat, etc.

                            Personally, I find his methods quite simple to pick up and quite devastatingly effective. I've learned Aikido, Krav Maga, and Tae Kwan Do, but Janich's methods are what I'm teaching my wife. The reason is simple - my wife just wants to learn some basic moves that will work, and she's not interested in putting in hours after hours of practice to learn the complex motor skills involved in Aikido or TKD.

                            Krav Maga is the most easy to teach of the three, and even this system is a bit more complicated to teach than Janich's.

                            You can find his videos at Stay Safe Media.

                            http://www.staysafemedia.com/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rogg View Post
                              Here I am



                              In my opinion it is always good to train with "experts", because you learn more and quicker.....

                              When you choose a good training center they should put you in a class which fits to your training level....

                              If they do not.... go away!

                              I started to train Krav Maga about 2 years ago, did a little bit of boxing and started to train MMA for a while, so I am far from being an expert but my opinion is, that the best way to learn fighting is to fight, so you should be prepared to endure some pain....



                              Uploaded with ImageShack.us

                              This is my arm after a training session...

                              I am also more for the practical way and I am not very interested in the far east "fighting" philosophy.

                              Many modern armed forces use Krav Maga, so it is probably one of the best ways to learn self defense.

                              Krav Maga is however divided into several clubs, organizations, etc, so there is no overall, worldwide organization which teaches homogeneous techniques....

                              I hope I could help a bit

                              By the way, I recommend to go to a gym besides your fighting training....

                              When you look like a bulldog most people won`t try to test your fighting skills...

                              Man, that's nasty!!!!

                              I've tried judo, boxing, kickboxing, and wing-chun based self-defense. I'd say each has their own strengths and weaknesses.

                              Just between Krav Maga and Wingchun, though, I'd go with Krav Maga, as Wingchun has a lot more extraneous movements and takes a longer time to get to where its really useful. If you don't mind the time, though, wingchun might be better in the long run. Have you considered the wingchun-derived jeet kune do?
                              "We have no white flag."

                              Comment

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