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  • #16
    I'm reading a novel, fiction, of an American taking swordsmanship lessons in Japan. I covers a lot of the mind over matter act of the sword. Hard to understand by SOME westerners.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
      I'm reading a novel, fiction, of an American taking swordsmanship lessons in Japan. I covers a lot of the mind over matter act of the sword. Hard to understand by SOME westerners.
      Interesting. What is the title, author? Do you know anything about the author's background? Does he have expeience in martial arts or just an outsider quick study?
      Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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      • #18
        Steven Hunter 47th Samurai he consulted with many Japanese martial Art Masters for this book. Profession is journalist.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hunter

        Easy reading and goes into the in's and out's of shooting. Historically he misses the boat some times. One of his books was made into a film "Shooter".

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
          Steven Hunter 47th Samurai he consulted with many Japanese martial Art Masters for this book. Profession is journalist.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hunter

          Easy reading and goes into the in's and out's of shooting. Historically he misses the boat some times. One of his books was made into a film "Shooter".
          Read it!
          Very good book!

          Have read a few of Hunter's books and he does an excellent job of conveying the concept of the "shooter" being "in the zone" ("... Use the Force, Luke.")

          When finishing "47th Samurai I'd recommend reading the "The Third Bullet" for some interesting "ahhs" about the JFK assisination.
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Third_Bullet
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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          • #20
            Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
            Interesting. What is the title, author? Do you know anything about the author's background? Does he have expeience in martial arts or just an outsider quick study?
            Hunter's books mostly focus on "sniper" missions but his protagonists get involved enough and often in brawls, back-alley 'street-fight' and other mayhem. Once you read one, you'll either like him immensely or not.

            In context of this thread, "47" highly recommended.
            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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            • #21
              Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
              Read it!
              Very good book!

              Have read a few of Hunter's books and he does an excellent job of conveying the concept of the "shooter" being "in the zone" ("... Use the Force, Luke.")

              When finishing "47th Samurai I'd recommend reading the "The Third Bullet" for some interesting "ahhs" about the JFK assisination.
              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Third_Bullet
              I have the Third on on my shelf. Reading Dirty White Boys now. Since early July I've gone through 7 of Hunter's books all dealing with Swaggers. Easy page turners.

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              • #22
                Saw a tv programme on Japanese culture where this featured a while ago.
                Safest place to stand for onlookers seemed to be directly in front of the target. The archers couldn't hit a thing.

                I remember a couple of guys at the club tried a bow out, shooting at an old mat placed against the wall of the dojo. They weren't very accurate either...
                "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
                  Obviously no experience; no tolerance for others' beliefs(unfortunately, a tolerance that we have lost in a constitutional democracy and on this website).

                  Agree, the mind does not move arrows. But there is something to the eye-hand aiming that involves the mind. In fact, American quarterbacks will talk about being in the "zone" for their hitting receivers, as well as players in other sports. Western science does not have an answer for this phenomenon.

                  Sad responses.
                  My attempt at humor aside, curious as to what type of bow you are training with ?
                  Four Types of Archery Bows
                  https://www.livestrong.com/article/1...-archery-bows/

                  You make it sound like you may be using the classic longbow.
                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Poor Old Spike View Post
                    Any Armed Assault III wargamers here?
                    It's bloody difficult holding your crosshairs on a distant tank when you fire an unlocked missile because you have to keep making miniscule mouse movements to keep it on track, and need fierce concentration to hold the hairs steady.
                    So yeah, I can well understand why some archers use Zen to achieve that concentration on the target..

                    Nice precision shot...
                    What happens when a Japanese film-maker gets hold of, "MacBeth," (a 17th Century hatchet-job in the first place).
                    Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                      My attempt at humor aside, curious as to what type of bow you are training with ?
                      Four Types of Archery Bows
                      https://www.livestrong.com/article/1...-archery-bows/

                      You make it sound like you may be using the classic longbow.
                      My interest is in the role of the mind in zen archery. I am not using a bow; rather, I am a shooter in the French game of petanque. With twenty plus years experience in various eastern martial arts and weapons, I never pursued zen archery, but I have an appreciation of the eastern mind in this art and believe it has an applicability for a western 'shooter'
                      in petanque for aiming and throwing a 72-76mm steel ball (boule in French) to strike and knock out a target ball (72-76mm) at distances between 6 to 10 plus meters. Perfect hit on the target can result in the shooting ball replacing the target ball (which usually held a scoring point).
                      Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                      • #26
                        ^Now there's a "rimshot"
                        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                          ^Now there's a "rimshot"
                          The great shooters in game conditions can do that about 25-30%. Pikers, like myself, on a good day can do that 15-20%, hence the martial art journey for perfection.
                          Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                          • #28
                            ^ This is an interesting "twist", as I, and looks like a few others, thought this was more archery related.

                            Concept brouched in the OP is valid, IMO. The subconscious is often trying to guide us when the conscious over-rules it. My "Use the Force, Luke" comment was a reference to this. Not to get too "Zen" here, but I've noticed that in many physical projectile events, not thinking too much leads to better results. "Absent-minded" toss of a ball of paper towards the wastebacket is more often a "perfect ringer" than one done with concious aim. I'd suggest keep practicing until you can recognize your mental "zone" and focus on how to spot and engage such a "non-focused" mindset.
                            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                              ^ This is an interesting "twist", as I, and looks like a few others, thought this was more archery related.

                              Concept brouched in the OP is valid, IMO. The subconscious is often trying to guide us when the conscious over-rules it. My "Use the Force, Luke" comment was a reference to this. Not to get too "Zen" here, but I've noticed that in many physical projectile events, not thinking too much leads to better results. "Absent-minded" toss of a ball of paper towards the wastebacket is more often a "perfect ringer" than one done with concious aim. I'd suggest keep practicing until you can recognize your mental "zone" and focus on how to spot and engage such a "non-focused" mindset.
                              That's what I pursue in practice, "an empty mind". When I can get in the "zone", I hit more consistently--just look at the ball and hit it. Staying in the zone is hard to maintain. I find that I start trying to aim and begin missing.
                              Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                              • #30
                                Appreciate your comments.
                                Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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