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Really Good World Historicial Maps

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Again, pending a thread of its own, 45 Amazing World Maps

    https://www.farandwide.com/s/amazing...spapers+Ltd%29

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    While I should do this in a new thread, I'm placing here for now since it revolves around current mapping tech and the "glitches" it contains; 'today's current being tomorrow's history' ...

    How Cartographers for the U.S. Military Inadvertently Created a House of Horrors in South Africa

    https://gizmodo.com/how-cartographer...y-c-1830758394

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  • tanklizard
    replied
    I find Omniatlas is a very useful interactive historical atlas. Not only does it show historical events and boundaries but it links to wiki articles with more information about the events. I particularly like how you can see when regional events occurred and compare them to events in the same region and time period that normally wouldn't be associated with them. For example the North America 1863 map allows you to see what was happening with both the French adventure in Mexico and the Spanish adventure in Santa Domingo and compare them to what was happening during the American Civil War. This site is really good for thinking up alternate histories.

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    23 charts and maps that show the world is getting much, much better

    https://www.vox.com/2014/11/24/72729...racy-good-news

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  • Kurt Knispel
    replied
    Thanks for sharing Compass Rose. I have bookmarked it to my favorites.

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  • Half Pint John
    replied
    https://www.bbc.com/news/av/technolo...world-s-cities

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  • Snowygerry
    replied
    Small post for future reference - thanks for posting.

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Here's another interesting approach;

    Dymaxion map
    ...
    The Dymaxion map or Fuller map is a projection of a world map onto the surface of an icosahedron, which can be unfolded and flattened to two dimensions. The flat map is heavily interrupted in order to preserve shapes and sizes.

    The projection was invented by Buckminster Fuller. The March 1, 1943 edition of Life magazine included a photographic essay titled "Life Presents R. Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion World". The article included several examples of its use together with a pull-out section that could be assembled as a "three-dimensional approximation of a globe or laid out as a flat map, with which the world may be fitted together and rearranged to illuminate special aspects of its geography."[1] Fuller applied for a patent in the United States in February 1944, the patent application showing a projection onto a cuboctahedron. The patent was issued in January 1946.[2]

    The 1954 version published by Fuller, made with co-cartographer Shoji Sadao, the Airocean World Map, used a modified but mostly regular icosahedron as the base for the projection, which is the version most commonly referred to today. This version depicts the Earth's continents as "one island", or nearly contiguous land masses.
    ...
    Fuller intended the map to be unfolded in different ways to emphasize different aspects of the world.[5] Peeling the triangular faces of the icosahedron apart in one way results in an icosahedral net that shows an almost contiguous land mass comprising all of Earth's continents – not groups of continents divided by oceans. Peeling the solid apart in a different way presents a view of the world dominated by connected oceans surrounded by land.
    ....
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dymaxion_map
    The world on a Dymaxion projection, with 15° graticule


    The Dymaxion projection with Tissot's indicatrix of deformation.


    The world is flattened into a Dymaxion map as it unfolds into an icosahedron net with nearly contiguous land masses


    This icosahedral net shows connected oceans surrounding Antarctica


    An icosahedron: This is the shape onto which the world map is projected before unfolding

    Last edited by G David Bock; 27 Jun 18, 16:49.

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  • Teenwolf
    replied
    Incredible site!

    Do you guys think the Mercator projection would be ever replaced by this Narukawa's design?

    This puts into scene how important are maps as a functional tool for presenting specific information, which depends of what you want to extract/show from/in them, not linked to a strictly geo-positionated reference.

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  • BELGRAVE
    replied
    Fascinating stuff:-many thanks.

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Temp. home, rather than a new thread ...
    This Wacky World Map Just Won Japan's Biggest Design Award
    The centuries-old Mercator projection is a notoriously inaccurate world map. For one thing, Greenland isn’t the massive land mass as shown on the map. But a new map by artist and architect Hajime Narukawa offers what’s possibly the most proportional map we’ve ever seen.
    ...
    http://gizmodo.com/this-wacky-world-...awa-1788437402

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  • JBuford
    replied
    Have the UTexas or EmersonKent sites added anything new lately?

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  • grishnak
    replied
    Looks like this could swallow quite a lot of time,thanks.

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  • Pakeeza
    replied
    I love maps

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  • worldwarhistory
    replied
    Originally posted by dongar1 View Post
    You also might try here as well:
    Whoa.... What an amazing resource. I'll be there for days. Thanks much for sharing this.

    Leave a comment:

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