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Little Bighorn (Custer's Last Stand)

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  • Little Bighorn (Custer's Last Stand)

    One battlefield I have been to was the Little Bigorn in South Dakota where Custer was beaten by the Native Americans. Very erie seeing all those grave markers strewn about where the men fell. Interestingly, there has always been a belief about a noble "last stand" on the hill by the Americans...but saw a show on the History Channel last week where they used shell casings and microscopic analysis of gun hammer markings to track the movements of both the natives and the soldiers on that day.

    Turns out the "last stand" was actually a group of about 20 or 30 soldiers down in a ravine near where Custer fell who fought and presumably died when the horsemen surrounded them on all sides and fired down from the ravines edges. There are no grave markers down there...because the bodies haven't been found yet. Just the shell casings.

    Another note of interest was that Custer's troops were mostly immigrant and young kids and not an elite force (as is sometimes portrayed) and in fact they did fight in formation for a while, but eventually fought in clumps making easy targets...and eventually they turned and fled (again making easy targets).

    A good place to visit if you are ever in the middle of nowhere South Dakota. The end of the show also noted they were going to build a monument to the Native Americans who died there...making it a true American monument.

    Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

    I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

  • #2
    did you watch the movie "the last samuri"? ...
    Attn to ALL my opponents:

    If you sent me your turn and after 24 hours, you still did not get anything from me, please be sure to post in the forum to ask for what is going on.

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    • #3
      No, I kinda wanted to see it, but they nearly showed the whole movie in the previews (before Return of the King) and I am pretty sure I know what happens.

      Did it have a tie-in to Custer?
      Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

      I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

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      • #4
        Hi Brian,
        What year did you go?

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        • #5
          It's been a long time...probably mid-to-late 80's.
          Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

          I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

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          • #6
            Little Big Horn (Custer's Last Stand)

            Fascinating battlefield to walk, analyzing the terrain to the cav and Indians movements during the fight. (I took a detour there while retracing Lewis and Clark's Corps of Discovery route through Montana.)

            Aggressiveness in taking the fight to the enemy is laudible but Custer's men deserved better judgement from their leader.

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            • #7
              Custer was one of those commanders that should never had command of anything higher than a battalion. A brave man, but somewhat limited in trying to analyize battlefield tactics.

              From what I've read about him, his main tactic was to have the bugler sound charge and off he'd go. It worked pretty much during the War Between the States, but in fighting the best light cavalry in the world, the Plains Indians, he was out generaled by crazy Horse and Sitting Bull.

              If he had survived the battle, he probably would have suffered what befell Reno afterwards.

              He violated one of the main rules of combat by deviding his command in the face of a superior concentration of the enemy, failed to do aproper recon before engaging the enemy and disregarded all the signs that told him that he was out numbered and most important he was guilty of being overconfident to the point of arrogance.

              The end was never in doubt the moment he sent Reno in .

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Hunter
                Custer was one of those commanders that should never had command of anything higher than a battalion. A brave man, but somewhat limited in trying to analyize battlefield tactics.

                From what I've read about him, his main tactic was to have the bugler sound charge and off he'd go. It worked pretty much during the War Between the States, but in fighting the best light cavalry in the world, the Plains Indians, he was out generaled by crazy Horse and Sitting Bull.

                If he had survived the battle, he probably would have suffered what befell Reno afterwards.

                He violated one of the main rules of combat by deviding his command in the face of a superior concentration of the enemy, failed to do aproper recon before engaging the enemy and disregarded all the signs that told him that he was out numbered and most important he was guilty of being overconfident to the point of arrogance.

                The end was never in doubt the moment he sent Reno in .
                Not only was Custer out numbered, but he was at a decided disadvantage in firepower. I'm sure he would have welcomed the Winchester repeaters that many of the Indians had over the single shot carbines his men had. The Gatling guns he left behind would have hurt either.....
                Lance W.

                Peace through superior firepower.

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